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Fujitsu Labs Develops Prototype Haptic Sensory Tablet 24

Posted by samzenpus
from the can-you-feel-that? dept.
Zothecula writes "Many smartphone or tablet users will already be familiar with receiving vibration feedback when typing on a virtual keyboard, but, though better than nothing, it's not particularly convincing. There have been attempts to make sensory feedback from touchscreens more realistic using electrostatic force, for example, or even creating the sensation of physical buttons by pushing liquid into prearranged tactile pixels, but Fujitsu is claiming to break new ground with its prototype haptic sensory tablet."
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Fujitsu Labs Develops Prototype Haptic Sensory Tablet

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  • Maybe some games that rely on touch as a novel form of sensory input, but I can't think of a useful program I'd want this kind of feedback for.

    • Well, there is a whole market of tablet games for sight-impaired users that has barely been touched yet!
    • Don't worry (Score:4, Insightful)

      by ArcadeMan (2766669) on Monday March 03, 2014 @12:43PM (#46388491)

      Porn games will think of something.

    • by jeffb (2.718) (1189693) on Monday March 03, 2014 @12:47PM (#46388511)

      Are you kidding? I'm having trouble thinking of an application that wouldn't benefit from this type of feedback. A few, off the top of my head:

      Tactile feedback on a keyboard yields a huge improvement in speed and accuracy.

      Tactile feedback on buttons helps confirm that you're hitting the right one, and successfully activating it.

      Tactile feedback on scrolling can give you another channel for judging speed or position.

      Lack of tactile feedback is one of the single biggest impediments to "virtual control" usability. I don't know if this approach is the magic bullet, but I welcome all research in this direction.

      • I guess, but what they've got is smooth regions vs. rough regions. I can't imagine telling any better if the button press is good before I hit it. If I'm aiming for the center of a key on a keyboard and I feel that I hit an edge, does that tell me if I hit the right edge of the one I wanted or the right edge of the one to the left?

        What makes a traditional keyboard work for me is that my fingers have resting places on the home row that gives me a physical sensation of where they SHOULD be. If I'm touching

      • by Dcnjoe60 (682885)

        Are you kidding? I'm having trouble thinking of an application that wouldn't benefit from this type of feedback. A few, off the top of my head:

        Tactile feedback on a keyboard yields a huge improvement in speed and accuracy.

        Tactile feedback on buttons helps confirm that you're hitting the right one, and successfully activating it.

        Tactile feedback on scrolling can give you another channel for judging speed or position.

        Lack of tactile feedback is one of the single biggest impediments to "virtual control" usability. I don't know if this approach is the magic bullet, but I welcome all research in this direction.

        This probably won't be as effective as you are thinking. The feedback occurs after the press. As such, for typing, it won't improve accuracy unless, you are always "typing" on parts of the screen that aren't showing keys. However, if you are typing on the "keys", all you will know is that you pressed a key, not which key. If you put your hands on a real keyboard, but have them on the wrong row, you can type gibberish all day long, even though you know you are pressing keys.

        Even with the feedback, it doesn'

    • 1) Porn
      2) Pr0n
      3) PORN!

  • by MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) on Monday March 03, 2014 @01:06PM (#46388693)

    but I'll still to my RM-9000 with Cherry Blues.

  • imagine what a virus could do.
  • I've tried the technology and it provides nice feedback! The problem then was that your finger would vibrate at a lower frequency, actually emitting audible noise.

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler." -- Albert Einstein

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