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Nanomaterial May Be Future of Hard Drives 82

Posted by samzenpus
from the future-is-now dept.
sciencehabit writes "Most magnets shrug off tiny temperature tweaks. But now physicists have created a new nanomaterial--an ultrathin 10-nanometer layer of nickel grafted onto a 100-nanometer-thick wafer of a substance called vanadium oxide--that dramatically changes how easily it flips its magnetic orientation when heated or cooled only slightly. The effect, never before seen in any material, could eventually lead to new types of computer memory."
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Nanomaterial May Be Future of Hard Drives

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  • Oh great (Score:4, Funny)

    by ArcadeMan (2766669) on Monday March 10, 2014 @01:27PM (#46447641)

    Something else that won't work properly in Canadian weather.

    • by CastrTroy (595695)
      Yep. Most touch screens don't work with gloves. e-readers don't work in the cold. an many other devices simply fail because they were "designed by Apple in California" or with the expectations that everybody has a good internet connection. Why do I have to clear off 4 GB of space (25% of total space) on my iDevice so that they can fix a small vulnerability with SSL on IOS?
      • by Grishnakh (216268)

        They make gloves that work with touchscreens now. They're only in the thinner gloves, though, not the giant arctic gloves.

        • by sconeu (64226)

          Hell, back around 1990 or so, I was working on a touchscreen interface for the Army, and we had to test with arctic gloves.

          For POC on the algorithms, I brought in some ski gloves, then we used the real arctic gloves for QA.

      • So get a capacitive stylus, which would probably work better than really thick/heavy gloves anyhow.
    • Yeah, Canada is about 100C too warm.

  • So a laser and a bigass heatsink then?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      They still are ways off from finding something that works at room temperature...

      "Vanadium oxideâ(TM)s atoms take on one arrangement above negative 88 deg. C and another below negative 123 deg. C. Between the two temperatures, however, the material contains blocks with both arrangements. That mixed structure makes it harder for the overlying nickelâ(TM)s grains to flip en masse"

  • by TechyImmigrant (175943) on Monday March 10, 2014 @01:38PM (#46447787) Journal

    > a 100-nanometer-thick wafer of a substance called vanadium oxide

    Why not say " a 100-nanometer-thick wafer of vanadium oxide" because a substance is called vanadium oxide when it is vanadium oxide.

    • by OzPeter (195038)

      > a 100-nanometer-thick wafer of a substance called vanadium oxide

      Why not say " a 100-nanometer-thick wafer of vanadium oxide" because a substance is called vanadium oxide when it is vanadium oxide.

      Because the submitter doesn't know any better and because the editors . . . well they are editors in name only

    • we like our substances, dammit
      • by Ol Olsoc (1175323)

        we like our substances, dammit

        I'm a big fan of Barium Cobalt Nitride.........

        Everyone loves BaCoN.

    • by trawg (308495)

      To be fair, some people might not be aware that substances are often made up of substance.

  • Spinning rotating mechanical disks to store data? Is this 1960?
  • What would be the edge over our current SSD?

    From what I have understood from the summary (I didn't RTFA) the only application that I can think of is a thinner thermal fuse. One layer of this sandwiched between two permanent magnets. When this material detects heat, magnetic orientation switches which will repel both sides opening the circuit. When it goes back, it will attract both sides thus closing the circuit. Advantage is there are no mechanical springs.

  • That technology doesn't sound very promising.

    • A more accurate headline would have been "Will this nanomaterial be the future of hard drives?". Then I would have been able to apply Betteridge's law and avoid wasting time reading the article.

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