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The Military

Russians Take Ukraine's Last Land Base In Crimea 551

Posted by samzenpus
from the in-soviet-russia dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Firing shots in the air and using stun grenades, Russian troops captured the last Ukrainian military base in Crimea today. From the LA Times: 'Meanwhile, Ukrainian and Russian officials were carrying on talks on evacuating Ukraine's loyal servicemen and families from the peninsula, a top Ukrainian military official said during a briefing Monday in Kiev. "About 50% [of Ukraine servicemen stationed in Crimea] joined the Russian side," said Olexandr Razmazin, army deputy chief of staff, the UNIAN news agency reported. The decision has been made to carry out the evacuation, he said, "but we need to work out a legal way to do it."'"
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Russians Take Ukraine's Last Land Base In Crimea

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 24, 2014 @02:39PM (#46566087)

    "All your base are belong to Rus'"

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Once Obama takes office, our respect and standing with the world will be restored!

  • by RichMan (8097) on Monday March 24, 2014 @02:45PM (#46566141)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G... [wikipedia.org]
    At the time Germay was "reoccupying land dominated by Germans". The League of Nations stood by and actually there were negotiated terms, the Munich Accord which spelled out what would happen.

    However, Germany was emboldened by the success of expansion. And the occupation was far from the end of the aggression.

    • by Brama (80257)

      Germany had a decent chance at the time, having a very advanced military and being technologically superior. This is definitely not in the cards for Russia right now. Sure they have enough firepower to destroy a continent, but it's also a guaranteed mutual destruction. Sure, Putin may try to nab a few more regions here and there that are relatively low-risk, but a world conquest is out of the picture.

      • by gman003 (1693318)

        Your argument is flawed in that it assumes people are rational and make logical decisions.

    • by Nidi62 (1525137) on Monday March 24, 2014 @02:59PM (#46566365)

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G... [wikipedia.org] At the time Germay was "reoccupying land dominated by Germans". The League of Nations stood by and actually there were negotiated terms, the Munich Accord which spelled out what would happen.

      However, Germany was emboldened by the success of expansion. And the occupation was far from the end of the aggression.

      I have found it the height of irony that Putin has been essentially mirroring the beginning of a conflict that killed millions of Russians (not to mention millions of people from other countries as well) in the name of protecting "Russians". Putin is playing a very dangerous game, especially when you consider that, for the last few weeks, whether or not Russia and Ukraine went to war was essentially dependent on some panicked soldiers not giving in to fear or uncertainty and pulling the trigger.

      • by RichMan (8097) on Monday March 24, 2014 @03:06PM (#46566453)

        Unfortunately we are in the very dangerous point of really needing lots of people to die to stop Putin. I am sure he knows this and knows that until he encounters a country
        a) willing to commit to the loss of lives
        and
        b) expecting to be able to "win" should a) occur
        Putin is going to be able to do whatever he wants.

        After the interventions in Iraq and Afghanistian it is clear that the west is highly resistant to (a) and is uncertain if (b) is even possible. With those massive levels of innertia Putin is going to be able to march all over the Ukraine and likely several other "Soviet" regions as well.

    • by MightyMartian (840721) on Monday March 24, 2014 @03:10PM (#46566489) Journal

      The actual beginning of the end for the League of Nations as a meaningful quantity was when it stood by and let Italy seize Abyssinia without question. Once it became clear to Hitler that there were no real repercussions to forced annexations, he felt quite free to begin plotting his own.

  • by BitZtream (692029) on Monday March 24, 2014 @02:50PM (#46566229)

    Here we go again. I thought this ended when I was a kid and that when my father and his generation passed away, that WWII would finally be over as though he was a good man, the death of that generation means the end of suffering for all those who not only fought in the war ... but had to come home and live with what they had done. Fighting a war, even for 'the good guys and reasons' still means you have to do things that no civilized man should be able to do in a healthy frame of mind, and none of them come up the same as they left. The winners are still losers.

    Alas it looks like Russia doesn't want it to be over and wants to rekindle its 'former glory'.

    Is my son now going to have to suffer the life of a soldier like my father because of some assholes half way around the planet can't just fucking leave well enough alone with his rich life of being a political prick?

    I'm beginning to wonder if my father and his cold war hate weren't that unjustified.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Charliemopps (1157495)

      Is my son now going to have to suffer the life of a soldier like my father because of some assholes half way around the planet can't just fucking leave well enough alone with his rich life of being a political prick?

      The only Political pricks that can send your son to war are right here in the good old USA. Careful who you vote for, and keep the camper full of gas... you just might be moving to Canada in the middle of the night.

    • by TubeSteak (669689) on Monday March 24, 2014 @03:20PM (#46566615) Journal

      Alas it looks like Russia doesn't want it to be over and wants to rekindle its 'former glory'.

      This has nothing to do with glory and everything to do with geopolitics/spheres of influence.

      Russia might be wrapping their activity in patriotism and nationalism, but that's just an easy way to sell militarism to the Russian people.

      The real issue is that Europe has been slowly encroaching on Russia's borders and Putin isn't about to allow a buffer state with a warm water port used by the Russian Navy to align itself with Europe.

      • by Calavar (1587721) on Monday March 24, 2014 @03:49PM (#46566921)

        The real issue is that Europe has been slowly encroaching on Russia's borders

        Utter nonsense. This is the post-Soviet area. Ukraine is no longer a buffer state or the "Russian border." It is a sovereign nation and can mold its foreign policy as it sees fit, whether or not those interests align with Russia.

        with a warm water port used by the Russian Navy to align itself with Europe.

        Russia has been moving more and more of it's Black Sea naval operations to Novorossiysk, so Sevastopol is not nearly as important to Russia as it was a decade ago. No Russia's Crimean intervention is about money. The Russian oil oligarchs want the natural gas deposits in Crimean waters (there is between 4 trillion and 13 trillion cubic meters to be had), and unlike Ukrainians, they have money to build the infrastructure needed to harvest those deposits. They afraid that Ukrainian integration into the European Union with open a flood of British, French, German, and Italian investment in Ukranian natural gas, eventually allowing the nations of the EU to wean themselves off Russian oil. That's bad for business.

        • As a not-quite-yet-middle-aged New Zealander by birth, I have long been fascinated by big, strong countries that formerly had empires (not enough to study it though). I lived in Russia on an exchange for a year and a half many years ago, and I spent 6 months in China, 6 months in Costa Rica (and many more countries for less). I have been living in France for the last decade. I have an aunt who (reverse-)migrated to back to England many decades ago and travel there regularly (about 30 times over the last 15

    • Here we go again. I thought this ended when I was a kid and that when my father and his generation passed away,

      Two things. It seems unlikely that we'll ever reach the stage that where we can be confident that a large-scale war will never happen again. Countries constantly jostle for power and economies rise and fall, creating instability, power vacuums, and changes in dominance. These are potential triggers for war. Secondly, we don't know that this is "here we go again." Russia may well quit with Crimea. Perhaps it'll push into Eastern Ukraine then quit at that. Perhaps it'll push into all of Ukraine, then quit at

  • OMG! (Score:4, Funny)

    by Charliemopps (1157495) on Monday March 24, 2014 @03:09PM (#46566483)

    Where on earth did Russia get the idea they could stir up political descent with spys, attack a countries network infrastructure then invade after there was a coup and have the people hold questionable votes for a new government that violate that sovereign nations constitution all while at gunpoint? Oh wait... that's right, we did. Shit.

    • Re:OMG! (Score:4, Insightful)

      by iggymanz (596061) on Monday March 24, 2014 @03:17PM (#46566577)

      please, the Russian's and other european countries were doing such things long before the USA existed, just substitute older methods of communication for your "network infrastructure" phrase

      • by Amtrak (2430376)
        To steal from a popular show:

        “Always keep your foes confused. If they are never certain who you are or what you want, they cannot know what you are like to do next. Sometimes the best way to baffle them is to make moves that have no purpose, or even seem to work against you. Remember that, Sansa, when you come to play the game.”

        “What...what game?”

        “The only game. The game of thrones.”

        Sansa (V)—Lord Littlefinger and Sansa Stark

        Politics, Diplomacy, Empire, War they are all the same game. And the game has existed as long as humans have realized that someone must be in charge.

    • Where? That doesn't describe Iraq. That doesn't describe Afghanistan. Your statement is false.

      • Where? That doesn't describe Iraq. That doesn't describe Afghanistan. Your statement is false.

        It doesn't? I think your view and my view on those 2 invasions may differ slightly. We were the benevolent helper country that "Freed the people" right? lol

    • by Assmasher (456699)

      Aaah, the "two wrongs make a right" theory...

  • opinion (Score:4, Funny)

    by bitt3n (941736) on Monday March 24, 2014 @03:37PM (#46566793)

    As Latvian, I not give two potato about situation in Crimea.

    I give one potato, but only because is very important issue.

  • by Nidi62 (1525137) on Monday March 24, 2014 @04:02PM (#46567063)
    According to CNN, it looks like the US and the other members of the G8 voted to kick Russia out. Russia's response to that should be interesting.
    • by Calavar (1587721)
      Yes, this is truly a devastating blow to Russia. As a result of being kicked of of the G8, Russia will no longer...... be able to send delegates to G8 summits. I think that about sums it up. And considering the fact that Putin skipped the 2012 G8 summit, I don't think he gives a damn.
  • Two men (Score:5, Funny)

    by SLot (82781) on Monday March 24, 2014 @04:11PM (#46567201) Homepage Journal

    are sitting in Odessa, discussing what is going on in Ukraine.

    Man 1: I stopped speaking Russian.
    Man 2: Why? Afraid the Ukranians will beat you?
    Man 1: No, that Russians will come to protect me.

"Confound these ancestors.... They've stolen our best ideas!" - Ben Jonson

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