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Earth Unix Technology

Introducing a Calendar System For the Information Age 224

Posted by timothy
from the might-not-last-a-whole-week dept.
First time accepted submitter chimeraha (3594169) writes "Synchronized with the northern winter solstice and the UNIX Epoch, the terran computational calendar contains 13 identical months of 28 days each in addition to a short Month Zero containing only new year's day and a single leap year day every four years (with the exception of every 128 years). The beginning of this zero-based numbering calendar, denoted as 0.0.0.0.0.0 TC, is on the solstice, exactly 10 days before the UNIX Epoch (effectively, December 22nd, 1969 00:00:00 UTC in the Gregorian Calendar). It's "terran" inception and unit durations reflect the human biological clock and align with astronomical cycles and epochs. Its "computational" notation, start date, and algorithm are tailored towards the mathematicians & scientists tasked with calendrical programming and precise time calculation.

There's a lot more information at terrancalendar.com including a date conversion form and a handfull of code-snipits & apps for implementing the terran computational calendar."
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Introducing a Calendar System For the Information Age

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  • Sabbath (Score:4, Interesting)

    by kurisuto (165784) on Thursday March 27, 2014 @03:20PM (#46595181) Homepage

    There have been various alternative calendars proposed, and some of them have the property that there's a special day in the yearly calendar which doesn't count as part of the regular seven-day-per-week cycle (such as the "month zero" proposed here).

    A significant objection is that some religions require that every seventh day be kept as a holy day. If the calendar contains a day which isn't part of the regular week, then there are sometimes more than seven days between one weekly holy day and the next.

    It's not a consideration for me personally. However, I'm sure that this feature would lead to significant resistance to the adoption of such a calendar.

  • Re:Um no (Score:5, Interesting)

    by i kan reed (749298) on Thursday March 27, 2014 @03:21PM (#46595187) Homepage Journal

    We can't even get our damned weights and measures base 10.

  • /sigh (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Guppy06 (410832) on Thursday March 27, 2014 @04:05PM (#46595699)

    13 identical months of 28 days each

    365 is semiprime and neither of those factors is either 13 or 28.

    in addition to a short Month Zero containing only new year's day

    Epagomenal days wreak havoc on "monthly" billing cycles (see: Coptic calendar, Mayan calendar, et al.). This is why the Julian and Gregorian bissextile day is explicitly a part of February.

    and a single leap year day every four years (with the exception of every 128 years).

    The Gregorian calendar design explicitly rejected more precise intercalation cycles in favor of numbers that were easier to remember (i.e. more user friendly). Hell, the quadrennial bissextile cycle introduced by the Julian calendar got screwed up in Augustus Caesar's own lifetime. Never underestimate the need for simplicity.

    The beginning of this zero-based numbering calendar, denoted as 0.0.0.0.0.0 TC

    We can't even get all programming languages to start their arrays at 0. What makes you think it'll be easier for non-programmers to accept this?

    is on the solstice, exactly 10 days before the UNIX Epoch (effectively, December 22nd, 1969 00:00:00 UTC in the Gregorian Calendar).

    The solstice is an instant; the date it occurs on depends entirely on your meridian/time zone (e.g. the Chinese calendar explicitly specifies Beijing time). So "exactly ten days" is a meaningless descriptor.

    Besides, since you're adopting a quadrennial intercalation cycle, that instant will drift back about six hours every year, further screwing up your "exactness."

    Last but not least: the solstice is a fundamentally difficult astronomical phenomena to measure. The instant it occurs is somewhere in the window where the sun's north-south motion is too small to measure. Equinoxes have historically been measured with far greater precision.

    It's "terran" inception and unit durations reflect the human biological clock

    Then where the heck are your 28-day months coming from? The billions of people who live under a lunar or luni-solar calendar already know that the average synodic month is about 29.5 days, and that's the "month" that affects tides and human fertility cycles.

    and align with astronomical cycles and epochs.

    Really?

    • There is no integer number or integer ratio of days (mean solar or otherwise) in a tropical year
    • There is no integer number or integer ratio of days (mean solar or otherwise) in a synodic month
    • There is no integer number or integer ratio of months (synodic or otherwise) in a tropical year

    Days, months and years have nothing to do with each other; there is nothing to "align" to.

    Its "computational" notation, start date, and algorithm are tailored towards the mathematicians & scientists tasked with calendrical programming and precise time calculation.

    Days, months and years aren't SI units, and the one true SI unit of time has jack shit to do with any of them.

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