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FWD.us Wants More H-1B Visas, But 50% Go To Offshore Firms 325

Posted by Soulskill
from the sources-say-50%-is-nearly-half dept.
theodp writes: "On the day the U.S. began accepting H-1B visa applications for FY2015, Mark Zuckerberg's FWD.us PAC stepped up its lobbying efforts for more tech visas even as ComputerWorld reported that the major share of H-1B visas go to offshore outsourcing firms that use visa holders to displace U.S. workers. 'The two largest H-1B users,' notes ComputerWorld, 'are Indian-based, Infosys, with 6,298 visas, and Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), with 6,258.' ComputerWorld adds that food and agricultural company Cargill is outsourcing IT jobs to TCS, including 300 in Minnesota, the home of Sen. Amy Klobuchar, sponsor of the I-Squared Act of 2013, which would allow H-1B visa caps to rise to 300,000 annually."
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FWD.us Wants More H-1B Visas, But 50% Go To Offshore Firms

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  • Because (Score:5, Insightful)

    by MrKaos (858439) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @05:17AM (#46637441) Journal
    Management still doesn't understand why you pay for talent.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Except when it applies to executive remuneration.

      • Re:Because (Score:5, Funny)

        by Thanshin (1188877) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @06:53AM (#46637671)

        Wrong. When it applies to executive remuneration they REALLY don't understand why you pay for talent.

        Otherwise, the problem would eventually solve itself.

        • by sumdumass (711423)

          A good amount of management salary is based on performence/ percentage of profits and stock options. This is what drives long term incompetance and low salaries because the more profit, the more the bonuses as well as higher stock value.

          There really isn't a good way to apply this to all employees ecept in mabufacturing were a piece count can be had. That introduces its own issues.

          So no, talent in management will only perpetuate the problem not solve itself.

      • I am an American, but I was not born inside America. I am a naturalized American - so I think I might have something to add to this H1-B debate.

        First of all, the entire H1-B scheme is ludicrous but it was a necessity, because the immigration system for America is totally fucked up.

        What America needs (and what the world needs) are talents, *REAL* talents, but the American immigration laws have been fucked up, thanks to the liberals.

        Now, as I have already mentioned, I am a *NATURALIZED* American citizen - whi

        • by Megane (129182)

          because the immigration system for America is totally fucked up.

          Would you mind elaborating in which ways you think it's fucked up? Seriously, you didn't make it clear and I would like to know your opinion on this.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by Grishnakh (216268)

            He wasn't totally clear about it, but he pointed to several big problems:
            1) the policy that one immigrant can bring in his entire extended family
            2) policies that allow immigrants to come in and then get welfare benefits instead of contributing to the system
            3) policies which don't seem to favor immigrants with talent whatsoever

    • by NotDrWho (3543773)

      Talent is only needed for some jobs. For most jobs, an indentured servant who does what he's told (or else!) is much preferable to some free citizen who asks questions and wants the occasional raise. Ideally, they want full-on slaves--who they don't have to pay at all and can beat at will. But those are still illegal (for now).

  • by harryjohnston (1118069) <harry.maurice.johnston@gmail.com> on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @05:24AM (#46637465) Homepage
    I'm not at all sure I understand the purpose of tech visas, but if the problem they're supposed to solve is that there aren't enough tech workers to fill the available jobs, then surely the upshot is the same either way? The visas issued to Infosys may be used to displace existing US tech workers, but those displaced workers are then available for Facebook to hire.
    • I'm not at all sure I understand the purpose of tech visas, but if the problem they're supposed to solve is that there aren't enough tech workers to fill the available jobs, then surely the upshot is the same either way? The visas issued to Infosys may be used to displace existing US tech workers, but those displaced workers are then available for Facebook to hire.

      Where are the opportunities for recent graduates then?

      • It still works out the same regardless of who the visas are issued to. If there are enough graduates to fill the available jobs, then you don't need any tech visas. That's an entirely different question.
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          It's not about headcount, it's about costs. US workers won't work for the low wages that the offshore outsourcing firms pay, unless they're very desperate.

          • by The Mayor (6048) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @05:59AM (#46637567)

            This is exactly correct. Plus, H1B visa holders are tied to the company that issues the visa. If they leave the company, they must return to their home country. Tech companies like Facebook like to have such indentured servants.

            H1B visas serve only to drive down wages for US employees. Additionally, they end up training foreign talent that are later kicked out of the country (after 3 or 6 years, depending upon whether the visa is renewed). They don't help the nation's interests, nor the public's interest. They serve only to increase the profit margins of the large firms.

            Get rid of the H1B, and increase the green card slots available to foreign workers, especially the Indians. I've very pro-immigrant, but the H1B visa only provides for indentured servitude.

            • by Chrisq (894406)

              This is exactly correct. Plus, H1B visa holders are tied to the company that issues the visa. If they leave the company, they must return to their home country. Tech companies like Facebook like to have such indentured servants.

              H1B visas serve only to drive down wages for US employees. Additionally, they end up training foreign talent that are later kicked out of the country (after 3 or 6 years, depending upon whether the visa is renewed). They don't help the nation's interests, nor the public's interest. They serve only to increase the profit margins of the large firms.

              Get rid of the H1B, and increase the green card slots available to foreign workers, especially the Indians. I've very pro-immigrant, but the H1B visa only provides for indentured servitude.

              I am seriously worried about the future of IT in the UK. A few years back we used to have half a dozen trainee graduate programmers a year. Now management outsources this work. The people who specify requirements, verify architecture, check for quality, etc are people who used to be trainee programmers a couple of decades ago. From what I have heard this is pretty typical for the industry. What will happen in a couple of decades time? Will we have to go to Indian companies for the whole system, specificatio

              • by L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @07:08AM (#46637709)
                The people that make the decisions don't care what happens in 10 - 20 years; They'll be retired at 50 with £X,000,000 in the bank and a new Ferrari every three months.
            • by whoever57 (658626)

              Plus, H1B visa holders are tied to the company that issues the visa. If they leave the company, they must return to their home country. Tech companies like Facebook like to have such indentured servants.

              Not true. H1B visa holders can change employers. Even if laid-off, H1B visa holders have some time to find a new job before they must return to their home country. The real lock-in occurs to those people who apply for green cards.

        • ... of course, it still makes sense to at least try to allocate the visas sensibly. I'd have thought the obvious approach was to give priority in any given period to the workers who are being offered the highest pay - that should favour the companies with a genuine need over those offering cut-rate replacements to existing workers.
        • by sumdumass (711423)

          I think the problem is that there actually is already enough workers, the shortage is mostly myth caused by either requiremenrs that are not needed or location. More foreign workers are happy to relocate for mediocre pay than US workers.

          This also tips the employment numbers in so that the wages can remain lower due to more workers that jobs. Low unemployment usually raises wages as employers need to attract and keep worker from a short supply. With more VISAs, instead of raising wages, they can import more

    • by Sockatume (732728) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @05:46AM (#46637541)

      There are plenty of STEM workers to fill the available jobs; I think the last figures put a 2:1 or 3:1 ratio of workers to roles. There just aren't enough available at the prices these companies want to pay. Hence offshoring: find a cheaper supply of labour elsewhere.

      • I dunno, the salaries shown in the database linked to from the lobbying site don't look too shabby to me. Of course that might all be made up for all I know. Be that as it may, I still don't see the connection to the outsourcing companies. How does the fact that they're getting a large proportion of the allocated visas help prove that the visas aren't really needed?
      • by asylumx (881307)

        I think the last figures put a 2:1 or 3:1 ratio of workers to roles.

        What figures were those? Were they regional? All of the US? j/w

      • by muhula (621678)
        +5 insightful? 2:1 or 3:1 ratio of workers to roles? While it would be fun to feed into the frenzy going on in this message board, that means for every job, there are 1 or 2 unemployed people... 50-66% unemployment And before you say that they're just underemployed, I've interviewed hundreds of candidates and the vast majority can't do simple aspects of the job (in my case, it was to write code). So, no, you're dead wrong and the people who modded you just have some sort of agenda or lack critical thinking
    • by dbIII (701233)
      It's a bargaining chip in wage negotiations. "Don't ask for too much or we'll replace you with someone from overseas" is the implied argument.

      If it was really about shortage then it would have gone away when layoffs added large numbers of experienced and skilled people to the pool of available employees.
    • by ebno-10db (1459097) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @08:39AM (#46638047)

      The visas issued to Infosys may be used to displace existing US tech workers, but those displaced workers are then available for Facebook to hire.

      No, because Infosys uses the H-1B's not just to replace American workers, but to facilitate offshoring. The H-1B's already know how the company works in India, fewer problems from language and cultural differences, etc. Most importantly, the Infosys H-1B's know that if they do a good job on their tour of duty here, they'll be rewarded when they return to India. The Indian Commerce Minister has publicly called the H-1B the "outsourcing visa".

    • by hairyfeet (841228)

      Because the H1-Bs are indentured servants they can pay them Mickey D's wages and your US tech workers can't live on Mickey wages thanks to our degrees costing 10-20 times as much as theirs? Not to mention unlike before where a person could get an entry level and continue to get an education while getting real world experience thanks to the H1-Bs you have an arms race where you need more and more degrees (and deeper and deeper debt) just to get ANY job other than lackey?

      Perhaps you should watch How NOT to [dailykos.com]

  • by Rick in China (2934527) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @05:36AM (#46637509)
    The American workers out of jobs, at least support American companies in the process, no? I'm not even American, I'm Canadian, so while I don't have a vested interest, I can see and understand the hate. Essentially it makes sense to bring in tech talent with the purpose of filling vacancies that can not otherwise be filled with the domestic talent. It isn't being used for that in many cases, though - rather is used to cut cost and 'get 'er done'. If the gov't is going to enable this cost-cutting advantage, it should make sense to at least offer it to American companies rather than foreign - why would they want to both displace more expensive workers as well as displace them with the intention of supporting a foreign enterprise in the process?
    • by DarkOx (621550) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @07:21AM (#46637747) Journal

      If you are tiny country or have small population yes it makes sense to bring in talent. When you are the 21st century USA with a plenty big population to fill most roles and a University system that is still considered among the worlds best, no I don't think it makes much sense at all.

      How do reconcile a pro-education social policy with labor and economic policies that are opposed to developing your own talent?

      The idea the USA *needs* to import tech workers is pure farce. If anything USA needs to put much tighter controls around the use of foreign labor. We should treat labor like any other import, wages paid to foreign workers ought to be taxed heavily. So if a company really really does *need* to bring someone in they *can* but would be heavily discouraged from doing so in other cases. There should be payroll taxes on foreign workers working for US companies in foreign countries as well, although these should be a much lower rate.

      Real Immigration on the other hand isn't a problem. If people want to come here, have families here, live here as residents and be citizens; great! Then they are our people, attracting good talent is an investment in our own country.

      Its pretty rare that I advocate taxing anything, but imports are an exception, I think we should go back to funding the operation of government primarily through import tariffs and foreign labor should no exception.

      • by dbIII (701233) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @08:01AM (#46637899)

        primarily through import tariffs

        The unintended consequences of such a thing on Sugar and Steel completely fucked up both industries, manufacturing, and the health of your countries children. It's an axe to be wielded with care. Overprotection of an industry can lead to putting it on permanent life support, a slow decline, and malign effects on industries that depend upon them.
        In case you haven't heard of these examples before, manufacturing moved to where steel was cheaper and expensive corn syrup ended up being cheaper that cane sugar.
        There's other things that can go wrong with your suggested approach. Byzantium gave it a try up until 1204AD.

        • by DarkOx (621550)

          You don't have to get overly specific. Today we have huge volumes of tarried schedules, rather than pick winners and loosers and try and prop up specific industries, I'd argue the tarried schedule should be limited to a few broad categories; commodities, hard goods, labor, and everything else. One tax rate for each category.

          Never for specific products like sugar.

          • by dbIII (701233)
            So then you have a very large number of industries on life support. Not a good way to swing that axe. A more delicate approach is probably much better.
            You also seem to have missed that those tariffs I mentioned ended up costing money.
    • by dbIII (701233) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @07:52AM (#46637873)

      It isn't being used for that in many cases, though

      Australia adopted the idea as well, just like many other stupid ideas from the USA and not many good ones. Initially is was to fill the shortfall of doctors after we'd cut the numbers of doctors we were training (a lobby group thought scarcity would be a good way to drive up doctors incomes). Now it's even being used to employ cleaners as "skilled workers" that are supposed to be unavailable in the country. The reality is that mining companies and similar are just importing cheaper employees via such a rort whether there are people available to do the job or not. There are certainly large numbers of unemployed people who could do such a job in the areas where cleaners and other nonskilled or semi-skilled staff are employed on indentured servitude visas.

      • a lobby group thought scarcity would be a good way to drive up doctors incomes

        AMA = Australian Medical Association?

        Note to non-Americans: the US AMA is the American Medical Association, which is a union with some peer review journals.

        • It was driven by groups representing medical specialists lobbying the Liberal Party and was actually against the wishes of the AMA. The person who made the decision to cut training numbers was the Minister of Health, Dr Michael Wooldridge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Wooldridge). A bit of a "character". He got into a little bit of trouble when he redirected the funding for rural specialists into funding for a building that was to be his new workplace after he left politics and the Prime Minister
    • it should make sense to at least offer it to American companies rather than foreign

      Problem: there really is no such thing as an American company anymore. Also, why should I care whether IBM or Infosys executives and major stock holders get rich? Either way, I'm still out of a job.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    When foreign goods are sold locally cheaper because the foreign government subsidises their farmers, the local farmers are hit hard. The same with finished /consumer goods, local industries get hit. The US keeps pushing developing countries to open up their markets so that US made goods can be sold cheap.
    So may be its always a give-take relationship. Not that I support hordes of H1B displacing US folks, but its almost analogous to what happens in other areas caused by US companies.

    • Yes, that's exactly how "Free Trade" works. It's a global race to the bottom. Companies everywhere lower their costs by leveraging modern communication and shipping to continually move jobs to the places where they can pay the lowest possible amount for labor. Multinational companies have no loyalty to the nations that spawned them. As short-sighted greedoids, they don't realize (or care, what the fuck, they're getting rich) that by impoverishing and reducing their workers, they're chipping away at their
  • Ya know ... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by cascadingstylesheet (140919) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @06:10AM (#46637593)

    ... Klobuchar is a Democrat. And these tech CEOs are noted "progressives".

    It seems that they think that paying low wages is a great idea ... for them.

    Other businesses, mind you, we have to mandate that they pay their employees more. And claim that this will have no effect on the bottom line.

    • by penix1 (722987)

      So what's your point?

      That a politician is beholden to the corporations? No news there thanks to the conservative Supreme Court's decision in Citizen's United.

      That corporations do everything they can to decrease costs and increase shareholder value? They are required by law to do this. It is their sole purpose for existence.

      That a corporation that pays substandard wages has to be forced to pay a wage that allows their employees to survive? I think it is sad that they have to be forced to do that. They scream

      • by DarkOx (621550)

        That a politician is beholden to the corporations? No news there thanks to the conservative Supreme Court's decision in Citizen's United.

        Want to quit harping about that already. The H1B program existed long before that decision was handed down and it IS A FREE SPEECH issue. I don't think anyone should be barred using their property to promote a cause. Why should some Union be allowed to basically steer unlimited monies to a politician but a corporation not? It makes no sense. As far as campaign finance goes requirements should be for real disclosure, something we don't have today. That would make difference.

    • by EmagGeek (574360)

      Using the Government as a weapon against their competitors is what progressives do. We are fast approaching the establishment of the progressive ruling class, where if you're among the progressive elite, your company gets favorable treatment from government, and a slanted playing field.

    • by Bruinwar (1034968)
      The I-Squared Act of 2013 is not a progressive's bill. It was introduced by Orrin Hatch. Cosponsors are a mix, 14 dems, 11 repugs. Wanna know who is in charge? Follow the money.
      • Follow the money.

        I wish they'd at least make that harder to do. It's so easy to follow the money that it's insulting. Instead of a "let's try to hide it" approach it's a "fuck you, we don't care what you think".

  • Simple solution (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Ecuador (740021) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @06:14AM (#46637605) Homepage
    Instead of increasing H1b's which are abused by offshore firms, make a new category for foreigners who hold a graduate degree from a top US school. The US has by far the best Universities in most areas, but the best foreign students often leave the US because of the very restrictive H1b Visa system (employment-tied, application only on April for October start, dependents not eligible for work etc). Why provide world-leading education and then let the best talent go?
  • by dwillyson (63193) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @06:42AM (#46637655) Homepage

    As someone who worked on an H1-B visa about 10 years back in Silicon Valley, i can confirm that these visas are being misused by IT consulting companies. They take the majority of these visas and then use them as baits in india for IT professionals. Most indian IT companies are nothing but cheap labour shops. If there is a dearth of IT professionals, make H1-B non-employer specific. All it does is make you a bonded labourer for 4-6 years with your employer who promises to process your green card while paying you a low salary. This is a big scam and i hope enough people take notice so that something is done about it. Most people on H1-B won't speak about it cause they don't want to go back home or lose their job. This is what keeps it going.

    • Thank you for being so honest about this. Seriously - absolutely no snark meant.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by sBox (512691)
      I am a US citizen (and native) who was employed by Tata for a F500 company (call them BigCo.) I had been with BigCo on a temporary project with another staffing group and BigCo's managers forced Tata to find and hire me for a basic support contract while BigCo's long time employees were slowly laid off. Two of us were citizens of the US on this contract, brought in by management, everyone else was either H1B or offshore. I can assure you that Tata let my contract expire and replaced me with an H1B worker
    • As someone who is working on an H1B visa in Seattle, I didn't see anything like what you describe. I get paid as much as my American colleagues - more on average, in fact. My employer has sponsored my green card application, which I'm patiently waiting on (and why'd they do that if they just want an "indentured servant"?) No-one has ever directly threatened or even hinted at abusing their ability to complicate life for me as an H1B. I'm also not aware of anyone else being similarly abused.

      Note, I'm not sayi

  • by QuantumRiff (120817) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @07:41AM (#46637815)

    If the claim is that there is a shortage of talent, then simply add a fee to the process, that is roughly equivalent to a years worth of college education in the state where the job is located, for every year the H1B worker works, into a scholarship program for that industry/disipline. Facebook should jump at the chance to make college more affordable for CS majors, since they seem to need so many of them. And hey, if the student can graduate without "mortgage level" loans, they can actually afford to work for less money.

  • by Required Snark (1702878) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @07:44AM (#46637839)
    This isn't selling out resident workers, both green card holders and citizens. It's capitalism in action.

    The US government is for sale, and the highest bidders get what they pay for. You buy enough legislation (and legislators) and you can make anything legal.

    Want to make more money in the short run by gutting STEM employment and destroying US based intellectual capitial? No problem! (Just look at IBM).

    Want to pay no US taxes while you plaster US flags on your equipment? You don't even have to make the flags in the US! (Caterpillar, a proud US giant.)

    It really is equal opportunity at work. You don't even have to be a US company to buy what you want.

    Stop whining, it's unpatriotic. You obviously don't love the US if you can't afford to buy you own slice of the American Dream. Tata Consultancy Services is clearly a much more important American Enterprise then any of the mere citizens who do useless things like live, vote and pay taxes in the US.

    It's not like there is a "Government of the People, by the People and For the People" or any other nonsense like that.

  • This is exactly why Zuck and his coven are such scum. It also proves that being filthy rich makes you more of an addict than a heroin user; you can *never* get enough money, and you'll fuck over your own fellow citizens to gain more.
    • a real heroin addict can "never" get enough heroin either, but then they die from it. Unfortunately, I don't think Zucky will die from too much money, at least until the Revolution and his head rolls into the guillotine basket.
      • Screw guillotines - I think the rich who feel they're so entitled should be made to live on a minimum wage income for the rest of their lives. It's less messy, and far more poetic justice.

    • The movie made AMrk look like a better person than he is.
  • by walterbyrd (182728) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @09:22AM (#46638345)

    There are still good jobs for American tech workers, in America.

    Just wait until we hit the next economic bump.

    When wages really get depressed, Americans will stop studying for tech. Then US employers will point to the declining enrollment and scream that Americans are too stupid, and lazy, to study tech subject. The only answer will be to import more visa workers.

    The more visa workers the US lets in, the more US workers will feel out of place in their own work environments. Then it will get easier to offshore tech jobs for even bigger savings. Then, due to technology transfer, foreign companies will take over - this is already happening in China.

    If you think things are bad now, just wait for about ten years.
     

  • Everybody I hang with in Minnesota loves Klobuchar. She has that nerd girl with glasses look and does photo ops out bicycling with the family. Probably eats granola. Always AWOL on any serious issue where anybody might have a different view so she'd have to defend herself on a reelection, she's always present for the photo op when she brings some tax money back for a women's shelter or something. In other words, the definitional example of a pork barrel populist. My point being that people in Minnesota who

    • by HBI (604924)

      Democrats aren't any deeper than FOX Republicans.

      FTFY. Half a lifetime in New Jersey was enough education on that score.

      Depressingly, the government is actually better in red states - polite junkyard personnel, DMVs that don't suck, simpler tax forms, etc. Entirely counter-intuitive but also entirely true.

      • The DMV in New Jersey was fine before Christie was elected. Since election he put through a series of budget cuts that have de-staffed the DMV to the point where you can count on long lines and excruciating service.

        There is an interesting map regarding economic class mobility by state that I think is the ultimate reason why you don't want a Republican state government.

        http://usatoday30.usatoday.com... [usatoday.com]

        The big lie is that Republicans want to encourage class mobility. The truth is that wherever they are in pow

  • by kcdoodle (754976) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @09:56AM (#46638617)
    Lets issue another 535 H-1B visas, take the first 535 people off of the streets in New Delhi and replace congress with them.

    I bet they would come to every session, special investigation, ad-hoc committee and all have perfect attendance. They would probably do a MUCH BETTER job, since there would be little in-fighting, and they would not be indebted to some controlling political group.

    Just a thought...
  • meanwhile... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by tatman (1076111) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @10:17AM (#46638843) Homepage
    Americans looking for work remain unemployed.
  • by Squidlips (1206004) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @10:35AM (#46639007)
    Corporate greed is what is behind this; nothing more.
  • Ask not, "why are the lion's share of visa quotas going to offshore companies?" Ask, "why are there visa quotas?"

    America's rise to become a great nation was driven by unlimited immigration. Let everybody in. Everybody.

    • We don't have hundreds of millions of square miles of fertile undeveloped land any more. There just isn't a need for indiscriminate immigration any more.

      The first immigration laws were passed in the 1870's, long before America achieved her current status as a superpower.

    • 2) India alone has 4X the US population, and China has 5X times the US population, and the US already has an unsustainable number of immigrants from Mexico. Clearly, we cannot let in everybody in the world who wants to live here.

      3) US students, and workers, are going to eventually ask: "why bother studying tech, or working in tech, when there is no way to compete with 3rd world wages." When that happens, the US loses it's technology edge, and that will lead to an economic nose dive.

      4) Other countries will l

  • by Shados (741919) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @10:54AM (#46639217)

    The argument about local workers being displaced aside...its a slap in the face for foreign workers who can't get an H1B and are actually the original target audience for those visas.

    I have friends who Canada with credentials up the wazoo, who have been working on TN1 visas for a bit, and want something more permanent. Those are 150-300k/year jobs (lead software engineers and architects) that aren't easy to fill outside of California.

    And they have to hit the lottery like anyone else, and more likely than not they won't get their H1B...and so they have to stick with TN or looking for an american to marry =P

    Not cool.

  • Why doesn't Zuckerberg take what amounts to beer money for him and give out a few hundred full four-year scholarships for STEM programs to native-born Americans? He could take the interest alone (at 1%) for one year on his net worth and foot the bill for probably a thousand students.

    • That has been proved over, and over again.

      Even if there were not enough US workers, all you would have to do is create good jobs, and you could be 100% certain that US workers would train for those jobs. No shortage of US students competing for med school.

      • by RogueWarrior65 (678876) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @02:30PM (#46641519)

        So then why does Zuckerberg desperately want to hire foreign workers? If he really needs workers and can't find the skills he needs with US workers, then they aren't being trained in currently marketable skills (I believe that based on personal experience) and he should fund training for the skills he needs which would take less money and time than a four-year college program. If he needs workers but doesn't want to pay what Americans are willing to work for then he's no different than every other company that outsources to China or wherever and any claims of altruism are total B.S.

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