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Adobe Creative Cloud Services Offline (Again?) 164

Posted by timothy
from the more-moving-parts-to-fail dept.
New submitter jvp (27996) writes "Adobe's authentication system for its Creative Cloud as well as its website services is down, and has been since Wednesday (14 May) afternoon. What this means: If you're a Creative Cloud subscriber, you can't log into your account via the desktop application. Online services such as the fonts are not available. Applications (eg: Photoshop, Premiere, etc) will continue to work. Softpedia has a nice article on it, but their time frames are off quite a bit." As of this writing, a message on the Adobe Creative Cloud page says "Creative Cloud is currently undergoing maintenance. Please check back later. Thank you for your patience." Even though I've come to like some remote-hosted software, like gmail, I don't think I'd want tools for manipulating local media tied even loosely to the uptime of a remote computer (or network connection).
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Adobe Creative Cloud Services Offline (Again?)

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  • by bazmail (764941) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @10:59AM (#47009043)
    Wasn't avoiding the "single point of failure" a large part of the reason for cloud services being pushed in our faces in the first place?

    This is truly a spectacular failure on Adobe's part.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Calm down you dolt. No self respecting photographer relies on CC for file storage, did you miss the part about applications continuing to work?

      • Re: (Score:1, Flamebait)

        by bazmail (764941)
        Dolt? Did you miss the part about the license validation services being offline?
        I guess so.


        You are the most dangerous kind of techie of all, you know more than nothing but less than enough, and are not afraid to use it.
        • by Anonymous Coward

          What's that say for you, then, as someone who assumptively dismisses the knowledge of others as being factually incorrect, while it is, in fact, your own assertion that is wrong. CC apps work for up to 60 days offline before needing re-validated.

          Dolt.

        • Which means that Adobe has something like 89 days to get the servers running. It checks monthly, but you can go off line for quite some time before it has hissies.

          If you're addicted to TypeKit or if you are one of the five people using their cloud storage, you might have an issue.

          The rest of us, not so much. In fact, if the software quits pestering me about Yet Another Upgrade Today, I'd be perfectly happy.

      • by Ol Olsoc (1175323)

        Calm down you dolt. No self respecting photographer relies on CC for file storage, did you miss the part about applications continuing to work?

        You apparently missed the point about the web services being unavailable. Or don't self respcting Photographers use any of them? Or do you justg have no ability to comprehend anything beyond what you personally do?

      • You obviously know your post is that of a stupid person, or you would have put your name on it. Why be stupid in public when you're aware of the problem? Does insulting people help with your appropriately low self-esteem?
    • by jvp (27996) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:03AM (#47009087)

      Fortunately, as I pointed out: you can still the CC apps while this debacle is being un-FUBAR'd. That is unless it takes them up to 2 months to fix it, at which point the app will no longer be able to authenticate and validate your subscription. THEN it's "NO Photoshop for you!"

      If it takes them that long to fix this, then they are truly, completely, and absolutely incompetent...

      • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        If it takes them that long to fix this, then they are truly, completely, and absolutely incompetent...

        Adobe, incompetent? I wasn't aware that there was any doubt about that?

        • >Adobe, incompetent? I wasn't aware that there was any doubt about that?

          I'm sure there is. They've accomplished more than most companies. Have you written anything as useful as Premiere or Photoshop?
          • by GuB-42 (2483988)

            Adobe are really good at making image processing software.
            But for everything else, especially all this "online" stuff, they are clearly incompetent.

          • by lgw (121541)

            Adobe hasn't done anything demonstrating even basic competence in over 10 years. Plus there's Flash to lay at their feet. Can IQ be negative, when applied to a group?

            • by Kalriath (849904)

              Flash was shit before Adobe touched it. Macromedia made Microsoft seem competent.

              • by lgw (121541)

                Sure, which is why Adobe can be described without Godwinning the thread.

      • by Robert Duncan (3655845) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:25AM (#47009311)
        Not all CC apps will work. If you have, for example, used CC fonts in an InDesign document, you won't be able view them properly or publish the document if you can't sign into CC.
      • by EXrider (756168)
        Actually, none of the CC apps work at all if the user hasn't had a chance to log in and activate them yet.

        This is exactly what happened to us, fortunately we only rolled the image with the CC Packager distro out two user's workstations as a test. As a result, they are both pretty much doing no design work until this is resolved.

        I'm sure we'll see a credit on our accounts due to an entire day of lost services that we paid for, right? Just like the cable and cell companies that hold monopolies in thei
      • by Optic7 (688717)

        Except you just happened to be come up for renewal on the authentication right now. Then you are screwed. How many thousands of clients will that probably be?

    • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

      by StripedCow (776465)

      Here's a link that could be interesting to those affected:
      http://www.gimp.org/ [gimp.org]

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        Probably not. Few people want to migrate to less-capable software. Learning new software is only worthwhile if the new software is more capable than the software you're currently familiar with.
      • For those of us who depend on Photoshop for print work Gimp does not cut it. Gimp has come a long way, but nowhere on that way has it been beneficial for print work that I see on a business level. In terms of layout, nothing holds a candle to Adobe either. I'd love to ditch their software after the whole rent to never own software model, but all I can do is not move to CC and make sure they don't get a monthly bounty out of our company's workstations by keeping with the perpetually licensed software.
        • > For those of us who depend on Photoshop for print work Gimp does not cut it.

          Agreed. GIMP is still missing Layer Effects.

          At least it supports nested layer groups, and all the blend modes, finally.

          Every few years I try to load a logo I made with Photoshop Creative Suite into GIMP and see if it will display correctly. Every few years it slowly inches towards rendering correctly.

    • by Ol Olsoc (1175323) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:17AM (#47009253)

      Wasn't avoiding the "single point of failure" a large part of the reason for cloud services being pushed in our faces in the first place? This is truly a spectacular failure on Adobe's part.

      The Cloud can NEVER fail. NEVER I tell you! Only we can fail the cloud.

      Software as a service has only one thing to recommend it. When it fails, just like it has here, you'll have someone else to blame it on. Of course your boss might not believe you, since he or she has been sold on the cloud and all it emcompasses is the zenith of civilization, the first thing mainkind has ever designed that is fail safe, and will never ever have a problem.

      • >The Cloud can NEVER fail. NEVER I tell you! Only we can fail the cloud.

        It really can't as long as your architecture is sound. Depending on a single cloud provider is a design failure. This does not undermine the value of having a 3rd party manage servers and software so you don't need to do it in-house.

        >Software as a service has only one thing to recommend it. When it fails, just like it has here, you'll have someone else to blame it on.

        Your inability to see the benefits does not cause the
        • by sjames (1099)

          So what we need is the ALL NEW Cloud Cloud! No need to worry about your cloud going down when you have the Cloud Cloud!

        • by Ol Olsoc (1175323)

          It really can't as long as your architecture is sound. Depending on a single cloud provider is a design failure. This does not undermine the value of having a 3rd party manage servers and software so you don't need to do it in-house.

          You realize you prove my point. You simply must provide thre references on the sound architecture that will not fail. I'll wait.

          Software as a service has only one thing to recommend it. When it fails, just like it has here, you'll have someone else to blame it on.

          Your inability to see the benefits does not cause them to not exist.

          Stop trying to put words into my mouth. Please show me where I said there were no benefits. I said it only has one thing to recommend it. The benefits which are there, go away for a multitude of reasons. And they have I have no intention of recomme

      • Creative Cloud isn't really a cloud service. It's just a website that authorizes your licenses every 2 months and provides an auto-updating service. They've never claimed Creative Cloud could never fail. They've honestly never even pitched it as cloud computing.

        • by Ol Olsoc (1175323)

          Creative Cloud isn't really a cloud service. It's just a website that authorizes your licenses every 2 months and provides an auto-updating service. They've never claimed Creative Cloud could never fail. They've honestly never even pitched it as cloud computing.

          Authorizint your license and auto updating seem like "services". As do Purchasing Creative Cloud subscriptions, as do Creating New Adobe ID's, as do downloading applications form the site. As do fonts. Many ar ereporting tht despit Adobe's insistence to thd contrary, their programs aren't allowing them to log in

          Adobe calls it Creative Cloud services. If you Cloudsterbaters want to keep moving the goalposts - as in if it failed, it is not cloud, if it fails it is not services - take it up with them. You se

    • by Dogtanian (588974) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:40AM (#47009447) Homepage

      Wasn't avoiding the "single point of failure" a large part of the reason for cloud services being pushed in our faces in the first place?

      No, that was only the rationale used to justify it to Photoshop users. The *reason* for it in many cases- such as this one- is quite obviously to increase software companies' control over users, and to get them used to a subscription model that provides those companies with a continuous income stream, rather than having the hassle of creating upgraded versions of software (gratuitous or otherwise (*)) and then having to convince users to pay for that upgrade when they might not feel the need for it.

      That's not to say that cloud computing (i.e. distributed computing and distributed storage) is a bad idea in itself; of course, it has many theoretical benefits. But the concept has been co-opted and distorted by marketing, who have reduced the meaning of "cloud" to little more than a buzzword that applies to anything with online connectivity, even if that's not designed in a cloud-like way. And they've used that to make a method of control a selling point- or at least to try to sweeten the pill Photoshop users are being forced to swallow (**).

      Really, what major cloud-like benefit does the latest Photoshop offer users? Does it let them harness the enormous power of a distributed computer network to massively speed up processing times on slow operations (vs. doing it on their own computer) in short bursts?

      (*) Canonical example, Microsoft Word, which reached what most people needed several versions ago, but had to force upgrades to keep it selling, so kept adding new features, which also force other users who want to interoperate with those using the latest versions to *also* upgrade.
      (**) Along the lines of (*) above, while some may argue that "you don't *have* to upgrade", those in industry who wish to interoperate with others and keep up with latest developments probably *will* need to upgrade eventually

      • by Jeff Flanagan (2981883) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @12:03PM (#47009651)
        >is quite obviously to increase software companies' control over users

        No, it only increases Adobe's control over their own software. This does not give them control over you. You can still do pretty much whatever you want with yourself or your own property.

        >and to get them used to a subscription model that provides those companies with a continuous income stream

        Of course. Do you somehow believe that companies should not be able to determine their own business-model? The fact that Adobe once offered an unlimited license to their software was their choice at the time. It didn't entitle you to anything regarding their future business.
        • No, it only increases Adobe's control over their own software. This does not give them control over you.

          You're being intentionally obtuse. It not only gives Adobe control over their software, but also control over your ability to use the software. That's the only kind of "control over you" Dogtanian was talking about.

          The fact that Adobe once offered an unlimited license to their software was their choice at the time. It didn't entitle you to anything regarding their future business.

          None of which is in disp

        • by Solandri (704621)

          No, it only increases Adobe's control over their own software. This does not give them control over you. You can still do pretty much whatever you want with yourself or your own property.

          More to the point, Creative Cloud is pretty obviously aimed at thwarting piracy of Photoshop and their other apps. Based on the few dozen people I know, the Adobe apps are the most-pirated software out there (aside from maybe pirated Windows installations). I think it was too extreme a response, swinging control too far

          • by Dogtanian (588974)
            Who claimed anything "with horror"? It was pointing out the obvious as far as I was concerned.

            Yes, I agree entirely that the measure was significantly about piracy- though the vast majority of PS pirates are unlikely to pay what Adobe are charging regardless, and they certainly know this.

            And yes, even though you define their "illegitimate users" as being separate from their "users", the fact remains that it *is* quite clearly also a money-grab from the non-pirating userbase, as no-one forced Adobe to co
        • is quite obviously to increase software companies' control over users

          No, it only increases Adobe's control over their own software.

          The "users" referred to are by implication users of Adobe's software, i.e. the people who chose to and are still using it. Adobe wish to control who uses it and how they use it.

          Of course. Do you somehow believe that companies should not be able to determine their own business-model?

          You're putting words in my mouth, as I didn't say anywhere that they shouldn't.

          The fact that Adobe once offered an unlimited license to their software was their choice at the time. It didn't entitle you to anything regarding their future business.

          Again, you're putting words in my mouth- I didn't claim that it did. But the assumptions you made and read into my comment just because I criticised Adobe, and the way you responded to them say a lot.

          What I did do is something that I- and anyone else- is

      • by chihowa (366380) *

        I'm with you until this:

        But the concept has been co-opted and distorted by marketing, who have reduced the meaning of "cloud" to little more than a buzzword that applies to anything with online connectivity, even if that's not designed in a cloud-like way.

        "Cloud" has always been a marketing driven buzzword and because of that there's no real definition of "cloud-like way". "The cloud" is derived from networking diagrams where stuff outside of the diagrammer's control and scope is handwavingly lumped into a

    • by sjames (1099)

      Buy Adobe, shit a brick!

  • That sure casts the Firefox DRM decision in stark contrast now, doesn't it?
  • The best part... (Score:5, Informative)

    by MachineShedFred (621896) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:05AM (#47009101) Journal

    The best part is that this is happening on the eve of Adobe canceling sales of perpetual licensing to Adobe Creative Suite products [cnet.com]. If you are a volume license customer, you will no longer be able to buy ANYTHING BUT Creative Cloud as of June 1; and you get to pay Adobe every month whether they update anything or not as expense rather than capital purchase.

    Hooray for not having competition?

    • by jvp (27996)

      The best part is that this is happening on the eve of Adobe canceling sales of perpetual licensing to Adobe Creative Suite products [cnet.com]

      I attached a comment to this article before it was posted, but it looks like timothy nuked it before he made it live.

      This "sniff test" for this is: hack. Not maintenance. I say that because the authentication system went down, as best I can tell, around 1700EST Wednesday. Afternoon maintenance is not unheard of, but it seems like a silly and unlikely thing to do.

      Hope I'm wrong about that.

      • by timothy (36799) Works for Slashdot

        Unfortunately, the comments attached to stories in the firehose don't stick when it's promoted / converted into a story on the Slashdot page. So, no nuking required (or intended), just a bit of a crufty system.

        timothy

    • by WillAdams (45638)

      The sad thing is, I'm pretty sure that Adobe has had this in the works for over a decade now --- it's pretty obvious that for each application they identified a couple of killer features and set them aside to not be implemented for any version w/ perpetual licensing, implementing them only after the move to pay-as-you-go.

      It also makes the ``release'' of CS2 when the activation servers were taken off-line look like an effort to take the wind out of the sails of competing products, incl. free and opensource o

      • I'm pretty sure that Adobe has had this in the works for over a decade now

        I'm sure you're right. Just amazing too how customers, who might have otherwise used the same version of software for five or six years, suddenly warmed up to the idea of paying $600 a year, every year, year after year, and not really getting much in return for it. The video editors dropping Premiere is more than a minority. Sony and Avid have been gratefully accepting that new business. Since Apple tanked FCP with FCPX that le

    • State wide we are being strongly encouraged to find alternatives to Adobe products. Adobe told the university system to eff-off and well as a state consortium of CIOs for state agencies.

      fine by me, they are being assholes.

    • by realmolo (574068) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:44AM (#47009487)

      The thing is, if you are heavily tied to Adobe products, paying $50/month to ALWAYS have the latest version is actually a good deal, from a usability perspective. Adobe likes to change/abandon file formats with every upgrade, and that causes issues. If you always have the newest version, you don't have to worry about that.

      You're right, though: Adobe has no competition. But that isn't Adobe's fault. For all the screwy-ness of Adobe's software, they are STILL better than any of the alternatives, and basically always have been. They "won" their market legitimately.

      • I disagree.

        Adobe changing their file formats every version is simply a lever to force people to upgrade. If they break compatibility in a highly collaborative industry like prepress, when the photography studios upgrade, everyone downstream is forced to upgrade as well.

        I like perpetual licensing - it allows you to buy software with project capital (tax incentives for business versus expense). It incentivizes the software publisher to actually add value in new releases - if they don't, then people don't bu

      • by Solandri (704621)

        The thing is, if you are heavily tied to Adobe products, paying $50/month to ALWAYS have the latest version is actually a good deal, from a usability perspective.

        That's true if you were always using the latest version. I usually skipped a version or two before upgrading though. That lowered my monthly amortized cost for the software to considerably below the CC monthly fees.

        I haven't yet decided what I'll do. Ever since I bought Lightroom, I haven't used Photoshop anywhere near as much. But when I u

    • Goodbye, Adobe. Hello... hmm. What's a good alternative, preferably open source, to Frontpage?

      And no, don't say HTML. This isn't for web-dev, it's for teaching a load of students to pretend they know what they are doing.

      • by cbhacking (979169)

        Frontpage's descendant is called Expression Web, and in most ways it's a superior product (among other things, it has a very strict rendering engine built in, and it supports a range of languages including non-MS ones). It's still Microsoft though, non-free and Windows-only.

  • by the_humeister (922869) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:05AM (#47009103)

    Most people will never learn.

    • by NormHome (99305)

      You've got me, I've been warning my customers that Cloud services could be prone to outages like anything else.

      I really hope that someone comes along and offers them some old style competition but IMHO the likelihood of that happening is slim to none. Adobe just has too much of a head start and no startup could compete with them out of the gate.

    • Yes and use what? It's not like there's a serious option that's an industry standard. I've never worked in a game studio where artists used something else beside photoshop or someone would even consider something else. They have the same kind of lock in microsoft had, it's not just about the "os" it's about the giant ecosystem of plugin built around photoshop, the millions of line written in custom import script for art assets in most studios, etc.

      Also, the thing that strikes me the most is that everyo
    • Most people will never learn.

      "A distributed system is a system where I can’t get my work done because a computer has failed that I’ve never even heard of."

      - Leslie Lamport, 2006 (or earlier)

  • by Anonymous Coward

    What a joke. Some company will come along and replace them as leader in the Graphic Design software market mark my words. It happened to the makers of Quark Xpress and it will happen to Adobe with their shitty attitude and overpriced software.

  • teh lulz!

  • by stenvar (2789879) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:17AM (#47009249)

    As of this writing, a sticky note on your local computer says "Windows is currently undergoing maintenance. The drive was infected by a virus you caught from an Adobe Photoshop plugin and needs to be wiped completely. We're trying to recover as much of your data as possible" Even though I've come to like some locally-hosted software, like TextEdit, I don't think I'd want tools for manipulating local media tied even loosely to the uptime of my local computer (or Windows), or endanger my Windows installation by installing anything other than completely minimal software on it.

    (Of course, Adobe Create Cloud may still suck and make you dependent on complex local and remote software, but cloud services in general have been a big win, at least for me.)

    • I don't see how it could possibly be a win for anyone unless they only use the product a couple months out of the year and end up paying less than perpetual licenses. They failed on their file storage for the better part of a year, forced their type syncing garbage into apps if you don't use it, give out useless junk like Behance that is of no use to people who aren't looking to pimp a portfolio, and have added zero useful features that merit paying every month for it.

      The only audience I can think this is
      • by stenvar (2789879)

        As I was saying: Adobe Creative Suite online may well be garbage. However, for many people other cloud software solutions probably end up being more reliable than if they try to manage their own Windows machine.

  • by argStyopa (232550) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:18AM (#47009263) Journal

    Hype/

    Why isn't everyone migrating to the cloud? Cloud apps are fantastic! They enable collaboration! Everything's great! Join the Cloud or be a dinosaur!"
    . /hype

    Steam is about the only cloud service that is reasonably adequate, and that's because if a game isn't available, it's not that big a deal.

    But for work-critical software? If you are "in the cloud" you're gambling with your livelihood.

    • by ColdWetDog (752185) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:35AM (#47009407) Homepage

      For all of you who take your cue from the Adobe marketing team, the moniker "Creative Cloud" is really a misnomer. Yes, the applications have to hit the authentication servers - every 90 days or so. The applications are run locally. The only thing that is 'cloudlike' is Adobe's 'Behance' service which is a store, a Dropbox wannabe and a typeface collection.

      It's a dick move and one that benefits Adobe rather than Adobe's customers (amazing ...), but it's Not The End Of The World.

      • I get the impression some PHB decided that The Cloud* was going to be the next big thing and demanded it be incorporated somehow.

        *Sarcasm capitals.

      • by argStyopa (232550)

        "...it's Not The End Of The World."

        Well, no, but it would suck pretty hard if you have to use Adobe products, their service is down, and you happen to be at a "software call home or no worky" point.

  • by nimbius (983462) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:25AM (#47009325) Homepage

    Creative Cloud is currently undergoing maintenance. Please check back later. Thank you for your patience.

    "Creative Moneytrain is, as are all your documents and immediately concerning projects, dead in the water for what you may as well assume is indefinitely. Check back now, or later, or whenever and it might be randomly back up. Thank you for patiently accepting the fact that we as a corporation to which you have gladly provided 4.4 billion dollars in revenue do not now, nor have we ever cared about what it is that concerns you regarding our products or services. please piddle around angrily in Gimp until your overwhelming frustration and lack of attention span sends you galloping back to our cold teat."

  • Is it me or is Adobe really taking a dump in terms of product and reliability?

  • by BoRegardless (721219) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:37AM (#47009423)

    What happens when the intercontinental Internet goes down because of War or other cataclysmic event?

    The history of both the Earth and mankind says these events will happen.

    At that point, how do companies and countries continue functioning "when the cable gets cut?"

    • by Timothy Hartman (2905293) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:47AM (#47009513)
      That's the kind of thing that keeps me up at night. In the event of a catastrophic event that could upset the lives of millions where will my InDesign layouts. When I rise from my bunker I'm going to still have trusty CS6 and those Creative Cloud subscribers are going to starve.
      • by opusbuddy (164089)

        That's the kind of thing that keeps me up at night. In the event of a catastrophic event that could upset the lives of millions where will my InDesign layouts. When I rise from my bunker I'm going to still have trusty CS6 and those Creative Cloud subscribers are going to starve.

        Ever since I had to upgrade from OS/X 10.6, CS6 has become increasingly unstable. Under Lion and Mountain Lion it now crashes daily and Adobe has stopped putting out updates except for ACR, for which it seems like every time they put out a new version to support more cameras, they go and change the UI yet again on me. I have yet to find a good mix of OPENGL and font settings that make it at all behave. Fortunately, I have a rock solid fallback--Photoshop 7 (which ran GREAT under Windoze XP, and hasn't suffe

  • I tried to download some e-books from my library website, adobe digital editions is dead while this the authentication system is down, so can't read any e-books. Another disappointment courtesy DRM.
  • by iamscottevil (714259) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @11:58AM (#47009603)
    I tried to download some e-books from my library website, adobe digital editions is dead while this the authentication system is down, so can't get any e-books. And it's been more than a day without any explanation. Another disappointment courtesy DRM.
  • https://status.creativecloud.c... [creativecloud.com] authentication is still down
  • WoW! (Score:5, Funny)

    by jeff13 (255285) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @12:03PM (#47009649) Homepage

    Damn you Blizzard! I pay a subscription, you're down again and... oh wait. nm

  • by Anonymous Coward

    You shouldn't need a cloud to be creative. I don't want to buy a subcscription, I want to own the software so I can upgrade when I want, not when Adobe pushes an update.

  • I work as a graphic and web designer, and I live in Photoshop and Illustrator. We don't utilize Typekit, or the cloud storage, so it didn't really affect us here at the office.

    As long as I can still do my job, I'm fine. I'm not a HUGE fan of CC's monthly sub, but the cost/benefit ratio can be insanely beneficial if you HAVE the money for the monthly fee. Now, for my freelance work? Forget it. I'm still using CS2 at home, and don't see it changing right now unless I come into a huge chunk of change.

    • by Rinikusu (28164)

      Yeah, the student cloud rates are completely worth it for me, but if they finally cancel that for me, well, not sure what I'll do as of yet.

  • And you had production work to get out *today* then you just paid your stupidity tax. Start looking at Gimp or Corel Draw. You may not like them, but they're there when the "cloud" disappears or the internet is down.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Photoshop 5?
    AE 3?

    nothin like workin hardware and serial numbers to meet deadlines

    "Let the Sun Shine in." - Age of Aquarius/Hey The Sunshine

  • by sandbagger (654585) on Thursday May 15, 2014 @01:10PM (#47010207)

    Creative Suite 6 will become Adobe's XP. Solid enough that no-one ever really needs to upgrade and expose themselves to cloud evaporations.

  • Wonderful comment in the Softpedia comments, linking to this:

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2... [theregister.co.uk]

    Oops.

  • We need to change the image of "the cloud". Here's the new meme:

    The cloud is a cold, dark place. Danger and evil lurk in the cloud, waiting for a chance to strike. You won't see it until it's too late.

    The cloud offers temptation. Surrendering to that temptation has a high price. Someday soon you will pay.

    Know the cloud. Fear the cloud. Watch your back.

  • It sure looks like the so called "Creative Cloud" got bumped to the Internet's slow lane!

    Either that, or it's trying to impersonate Valve's servers for TF2.

  • I support a bunch of creative types on Macs mostly for a living, as a sys-admin, IT-know it and do-it-all. This shits been going down several times a week for the past couple of months. Usually no more than fifteen minutes to an hour at a time, but it's really easy to miss most of the time. Unless you're actively setting up new systems or inviting new users to teams your shit just keeps working and you don't notice. To say the least it's made me look like a fool more than once.

    Can't login? Well do the little password reset thing. What? It says your user and password aren't right? Let me verify I've got you setup right.

    Uhmm, I can't login either. I'm sure it's the right password.

    Hey, can you login over there?

    -- I don't like being made to look like a fool. The fact these bozo's have been doing it a couple of times a week recently is annoying.

    What's even worse is I'm a Linux guy. I prefer using the Gimp and other FOSS stuff over what I'm supporting anyways.

  • When will the bean counters realize that the money saved up front on administrative overhead is lost during the first downtime? There are benefits to having the technical staff on your side of the router and binaries that don't have needless "did your mom say it's ok" dependencies.

  • I like to mention this: http://arstechnica.com/civis/v... [arstechnica.com]

  • Maybe it is the heat, but it hasn't been a good week for clouds. Fire took out my cloud when an XO circuit killed my hosted DNS and subsequently my hosted website and "cloud" email. Different fire somehow took out one of our supplier's SIP trunks leaving them without phones.

    Oh well... still have two 9's for the past 12 months...

  • ... if Adobe had started following the suite of App-Developers in the mobile arena ... requiring in-app purchases to use features ... ;)

    Ultimately, customers are at fault - they shouldn't have renewed any services with Adobe that require the online connection ... but companies will keep on abusing customers as long as they keep buying their products ...

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