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Technology Idle

The Improbable Story of the 184 MPH Jet Train 195

Posted by samzenpus
from the have-jet-will-travel dept.
MatthewVD writes Almost half a century ago, New York Central Railroad engineer Don Wetzel and his team bolted two J47-19 jet engines, throttled up the engines and tore down a length of track from Butler, Indiana to Stryker, Ohio at almost 184 mph. Today, the M-497 still holds the record for America's fastest train. This is the story of how it happened.
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The Improbable Story of the 184 MPH Jet Train

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  • by mi (197448) <slashdot-2012@virtual-estates.net> on Thursday July 17, 2014 @12:48AM (#47472641) Homepage

    Yes, I know, I know. The crazy Libertarian talk. But that is, what happened [wikipedia.org] — a combination of government regulating the cost of tickets, while imposing heavy taxes and building highways, where automobiles — both passenger and goods-carrying — could travel for less and less.

    And then Amtrak took over all passenger rail-travel, and has never shown a profit since — losing money on the most idiotic things [bloomberg.com] — while, demanding the passengers "carry identification at all times" [amtrak.com]...

  • The death of trains (Score:5, Interesting)

    by mcrbids (148650) on Thursday July 17, 2014 @01:42AM (#47472769) Journal

    In Europe, they discovered that train wrecks were really, really bad. So they set about building a system of trains that didn't wreck, with numerous controls and systems to prevent collisions, resulting in an excellent safety record and low cost.

    In the United States, they discovered that train wrecks were really, really bad. So they set about building a system of trains that survived wrecks with minimal injuries, with heavy crash cages and crumple zones in order to gracefully survive collisions, resulting in an excellent safety record and ridiculous costs.

    Making a US train go as fast as an EU train is very difficult to do feasibly, since it weighs at least 4x as much per passenger.

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