Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Communications Networking Security The Internet

Securing Networks In the Internet of Things Era 106

Posted by timothy
from the glad-that-someone-finally-invented-things dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Gartner reckons that the number of connected devices will hit 26 billion by 2020, almost 30 times the number of devices connected to the IoT in 2009. This estimate doesn't even include connected PCs, tablets and smartphones. The IoT will represent the biggest change to our relationship with the Internet since its inception. Many IoT devices themselves suffer from security limitations as a result of their minimal computing capabilities. For instance, the majority don't support sufficiently robust mechanisms for authentication, leaving network admins with only weak alternatives or sometimes no alternatives at all. As a result, it can be difficult for organizations to provide secure network access for certain IoT devices."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Securing Networks In the Internet of Things Era

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday August 23, 2014 @06:36AM (#47735627)

    Exactly. I have yet to see a compelling argument or application for this "Internet of Things." I mean, it's a really catchy buzzword. I know my toaster is bored most of the day, having only 5 minutes' work to do each morning, and I can see where it might enjoy surfing the web during downtime. Maybe I'm just not very creative, that I fail to imagine the wondrous potential embodied in uploading my toast-cooking routine and consumption to the cloud. WTF do people want this?

    Until someone can explain the actual benefit to me, I'm going to see "Internet of Things" as a way to turn every object in my house into an advertisement and a potential hole in my already fragile network security.

    You want an explanation?

    Outside of IT, name 10 people you know who that have ever used the words "potential hole" and "fragile network security" when discussing their home wifi concerns.

    As far as your quest for a compelling argument, the audience hardly compels me with their brilliance. Consumers are for the most part children regardless of age, proven by the billions generated on some of the silliest shit in existence. Children want toys, not rules, hence the IOT we have today.

  • Seperate VLAN. (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Karmashock (2415832) on Saturday August 23, 2014 @07:32AM (#47735759)

    You can buy a router for 200 bucks that can do port by port VLAN or create different Wifi SSIDs that link to different VLANs.

    Put all your internet of things stuff on VLAN 2, then setup firewall rules that allow the hub for the internet of things devices to either communicate directly with a control system on VLAN1 or just go out to the internet. If VLAN 2 is compromised... it will not compromise VLAN 1.

  • Re:Seperate VLAN. (Score:4, Interesting)

    by dotwhynot (938895) on Saturday August 23, 2014 @07:53AM (#47735843)

    You can buy a router for 200 bucks that can do port by port VLAN or create different Wifi SSIDs that link to different VLANs.

    Put all your internet of things stuff on VLAN 2, then setup firewall rules that allow the hub for the internet of things devices to either communicate directly with a control system on VLAN1 or just go out to the internet. If VLAN 2 is compromised... it will not compromise VLAN 1.

    What happens when your 200 bucks router is compromised?

  • Re:Seperate VLAN. (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Karmashock (2415832) on Saturday August 23, 2014 @08:09AM (#47735909)

    Same thing that happens when your router is compromised today. Its a zero sum game. At least the router has a chance of repelling an intrusion because it has some security features built into it. The IoTs stuff is naked.

    My worry with IoTs stuff is that an outside intruder will gain control over them through the internet. I'm less worried about a war driver tapping in from the street. The router idea should provide my computers protection from the shotty security of the IoTs.

    Ideally the IoTs stuff should not link to some centralized cloud server but rather host itself locally. If it does that, then I can set the incoming port numbers to something random and at that point its pretty unlikely anything is going to touch my system.

    Logging into my local hub of IoTs stuff should work something like this:

    https://myhomeiprandomportnumb... [myhomeiprandomportnumber]

    At that point while a breach is possible its just very unlikely.

Sigmund Freud is alleged to have said that in the last analysis the entire field of psychology may reduce to biological electrochemistry.

Working...