Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Windows Graphics Operating Systems Upgrades Linux

Windows 10, From a Linux User's Perspective 321

Phoronix features today a review of Windows 10 that's a little different from most you might read, because it's specifically from the point of view of an admin who uses both Windows and Linux daily, rather than concentrating only on the UI of Windows qua Windows. Reviewer Eric Griffith finds some annoyances (giant start menu even when edited to contain fewer items, complicated process if you want a truly clean install), but also some good things, like improved responsiveness ("feels much more responsive than even my Gnome and KDE installations under Fedora") and an appropriately straightforward implementation of virtual workspaces. Overall? Windows 10 is largely an evolutionary upgrade over Windows 7 and Windows 8.1, rather than a revolutionary one. Honestly I think the only reason it will be declared as 'so good' is because Windows 8/8.1 were so bad. Sure, Microsoft has made some good changes under the surface-- the animations feel crisper, its relatively light on resources, battery life is good. There is nothing -wrong- with Windows 10 aside from the Privacy Policy. If you're on Windows Vista, or Windows 8/8.1, then sure, upgrade. The system is refreshing to use, it's perfectly fine and definitely an upgrade. If you're on Windows 7 though? I'm not so sure. ... Overall, there's really nothing to see here. It's not terrible, it's not even 'bad, it's just... okay. A quiet little upgrade.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Windows 10, From a Linux User's Perspective

Comments Filter:
  • My big hope (Score:4, Funny)

    by smittyoneeach ( 243267 ) * on Sunday August 09, 2015 @04:43PM (#50280913) Homepage Journal
    My big hope is that this version's Environment Variable easter egg is buried under a few more layers of indirection.
    With each new version, one must spend several extra minutes figuring out where the Double Secret Super Duper Advanced Don't Try This At Home Brutal Power User Steel Cage Death Match Of Dh00m dialog is located, merely to set the PATH.
    Sure, I'll get modded 'Flamebait' for this, but seriously: quit kicking me in the groin, Redmond.
    • Re:My big hope (Score:5, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday August 09, 2015 @05:10PM (#50281043)

      My big hope is that this version's Environment Variable easter egg is buried under a few more layers of indirection.

      With each new version, one must spend several extra minutes figuring out where the Double Secret Super Duper Advanced Don't Try This At Home Brutal Power User Steel Cage Death Match Of Dh00m dialog is located, merely to set the PATH.

      You're kidding, right?

      Hit the Windows key, type the first couple letters of "environment" (on my machine "env" is enough) and hit down arrow a few times to select "Edit the system environment variables" (or "for your account", whichever tickles your fancy). Hit Enter.

      This has worked reliably ever since the search feature got built into the Start menu in Windows 7.

      If remembering that PATH is under "environment variables" is too hard then searching for "path" will actually work just as well.

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        Nothing about the Windows key ever suggested using it like that. I've always waded through the User menus as close as I could get to the system menu, and put a shortcut on the desktop.
        • by psavo ( 162634 )

          The windows search (the one where you just press Windows key and write in) was _the_ thing that was became great in W8. It was okayish (apart from retarded filesystem search) since Vista, where it showed more into various Control Panel dialogs. MS was dumb to not sell it as the next coming of $deity.

        • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

          So, when you opened the "user menus", by which I assume you mean the start menu since that's the only one after you boot up, you didn't notice the search box or the flashing cursor that was placed inside it waiting for your input?

          In fact, on Windows 10 the search box is now in the task bar. It's huge, impossible to miss, right next to the start icon. I actually disable it because I'm expecting my apps to be there by default. I'm sure that's why MS put it there, to make it blindingly obvious and impossible t

      • Try searching for 'windows update' that way. On my Win10 box it doesn't show. If I search in the main screen of the control panel it still doesn't show even though it's right there on the fucking screen! Somehow they managed to royally screw up search in this release.
    • Re:My big hope (Score:5, Informative)

      by thebjorn ( 530874 ) <bjorn@tkbe.org> on Sunday August 09, 2015 @05:17PM (#50281089) Homepage
      Win + Break gets you to the link for 'Advanced system settings'. Works in at least win7, 8, 8.1, 10.
      • Re:My big hope (Score:5, Insightful)

        by bmo ( 77928 ) on Sunday August 09, 2015 @05:34PM (#50281171)

        Because that's intuitive.

        Settings, even "advanced system settings" should be in the control-panel.

        It's like Windows is following the Gnome crowd. "Let's hide configurations, because letting the user adjust the workspace to his work is confusing!"

        *spit*

        --
        BMO

        • Placing chicken entrails in the lower right screen corner also performs this function. Windows lets you accomplish tasks in multiple intuitive ways.
        • Re:My big hope (Score:4, Interesting)

          by ultranova ( 717540 ) on Sunday August 09, 2015 @11:17PM (#50282443)

          It's like Windows is following the Gnome crowd. "Let's hide configurations, because letting the user adjust the workspace to his work is confusing!"

          It is. Microsoft and Gnome are marketing to companies. And companies want to treat their employees as interchangeable cogs. That means the desktop needs to be non-configurable in any meaningful way, to ensure any user can be dropped in front of any computer and be instantly up to speed without having to learn anything. So as far as Microsoft and Gnome are concerned, personalization is a bad thing.

      • Win + Break gets you to the link for 'Advanced system settings'. Works in at least win7, 8, 8.1, 10.

        Ha! So it does. Thanks.

      • Also, Windows+X pops up a menu with some handy shortcuts, including an administrative shell. This only works on Win8 and higher, from what I remember...

    • Learn to powershell?:

      To read a variable:

      Get-ChildItem Env:
      or
      $env:Varname

      and to set

      [environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("Var","Value","User/Machine")

      evening doing this from cmd.exe isn't all that hard - in fact its just like ms-dos was:

      SET variable=string

      Then

      echo %variable%

      Seriously - this hasn't changed in 34-35 years.

      • Re: My big hope (Score:4, Informative)

        by cyber-vandal ( 148830 ) on Sunday August 09, 2015 @06:36PM (#50281425) Homepage

        Until you reboot and then it disappears smartass. Next you'll be telling us to update autoexec.bat

        • You're right, for setting environment variables permanently you use setx instead. http://ss64.com/nt/setx.html [ss64.com]

          I learned the DOS command line well in the early nineties, and a surprising amount has stuck with me. I use Windows 10 at work, admin Hyper-V and Linux servers there and run Linux at home 99% of the time. This kind of review looks exactly what I'm looking for but really, since I do much of my work from the command line in both environments, I'm surprised the GUI gets so much focus. It just seems li

    • by t0y ( 700664 )
      It's in the same place since at least Vista. Probably earlier but I can't remember.
    • With each new version, one must spend several extra minutes figuring out where the Double Secret Super Duper Advanced Don't Try This At Home Brutal Power User Steel Cage Death Match Of Dh00m dialog is located, merely to set the PATH.

      Whaaaat? Could you provide examples of how to set the PATH variable in the different version of Windows. Because honestly, I've only ever done it one way for last 16 some odd years now.

    • Type

      [Start] e n v

      Win 10 responds with
      "Edit environment variables for your account"

      Type

      [Enter]

      Still works

    • by flink ( 18449 )

      My big hope is that this version's Environment Variable easter egg is buried under a few more layers of indirection.

      With each new version, one must spend several extra minutes figuring out where the Double Secret Super Duper Advanced Don't Try This At Home Brutal Power User Steel Cage Death Match Of Dh00m dialog is located, merely to set the PATH.

      Since Windows XP (and maybe 2000) up through Windows 7, you could just right click on Computer in Explorer, select Properties..., and click the "Advanced" button, and click "Environment Variables..." button. Yeah, it's perhaps too many steps, but they haven't changed the route to get there significantly in 15 years.

  • by __aaclcg7560 ( 824291 ) on Sunday August 09, 2015 @04:44PM (#50280921)

    Honestly I think the only reason it will be declared as 'so good' is because Windows 8/8.1 were so bad.

    I thought the Windows 8/8.1 desktop was no better or no worse than the Windows 7 desktop. Of course, I banished the Metro interface five minutes after installing. Then again, I never bother with the GUI on Linux, as the command line is always excellent.

  • by kilgortrout ( 674919 ) on Sunday August 09, 2015 @04:52PM (#50280959)
    "There is nothing -wrong- with Windows 10 aside from the Privacy Policy."

    And apart from that, how did you enjoy the play Mrs. Lincoln!!!!
    • by dbIII ( 701233 )

      "There is nothing -wrong- with Windows 10 aside from the Privacy Policy." And apart from that, how did you enjoy the play Mrs. Lincoln!!!!

      Connected with that is the bandwidth sharing.
      The bittorrent thing is acceptable in World of Warcraft because they inform you about it on the screen and provide a box to tick to turn it off. MS noticed that Blizzard is sending out patches that way, decided to copy it but decided to remove the things that makes it acceptable.
      It's a pretty big deal in places where users have data limits and uploads count to those limits.

  • Although you can make the start menu smaller than what is shown.
  • Finally (Score:5, Interesting)

    by jbmartin6 ( 1232050 ) on Sunday August 09, 2015 @05:02PM (#50281019)
    “Overall, there's really nothing to see here. It's not terrible, it's not even 'bad, it's just... okay. A quiet little upgrade.”

    Cue choir music and white spotlight! This is the way it should be! I've often observed, people use applications not the OS. The OS should make it easy, simple, fast, etc. for people to use their applications in the way that they want. No more, no less. When the OS gets in the way, it is a fail. The best, and best selling, versions of Windows were the ones that moved closer to this principle than their predecessors.
  • Looks like that server is already a smoldering pile of silicon...

    Here's the CORAL link, which as of this writing, isn't working, yet... but in my experience, it usually does start working before the full Slashdot wave subsides.

    http://www.phoronix.com.nyud.n... [nyud.net]

  • The comments made sense and were not scary. People want to be scared when reading news. Come on, let's get back to saying that Windows 10 will create worm holes that suck us all back to Vista and that Microsoft will be snapping pictures of you in your underwear, not the clean ones either.
  • Live tiles are fantastic. I love how people denigrate live tiles while plastering widgets all over the desktop.

  • by msobkow ( 48369 ) on Sunday August 09, 2015 @05:23PM (#50281125) Homepage Journal

    The one problem I encountered with Windows 10 is my Linux box could no longer print to the network printer. Sure enough, sharing had been disabled by the upgrade. But even when I re-enabled sharing of the printer, Linux couldn't print to it. Linux could find it. Linux could connect to it. But it would get stuck trying to spool the document and never show up in the print queue under Windows 10.

    I opted for the obvious (and easy) solution of moving the printer to my Linux box, but not everyone can do that, especially with a truly shared printer in an office. Though, to be fair, print servers really should be running Linux in the first place. They're more reliable.

    I couldn't believe how much crapware I had to disable with Windows 10, though, especially from the menu. WTF would I want an "XBox" account tile for when I don't own a gaming system of any kind, much less one susceptible to the "red ring of death"?

    On the bright side, all of my commercial databases seem to run just fine. Even Cygwin hasn't given me grief yet.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by danomac ( 1032160 )

      Though, to be fair, print servers really should be running Linux in the first place. They're more reliable.

      Well, Windows Print Server/Print Management has been very reliable in my own experience (in a domain environment.) The only time I've ever had an issue with it is when I mistakenly tried to install an HP printer CD instead of just downloading the basic driver from HP's site. Never again...

    • "WTF would I want an "XBox" account tile for when I don't own a gaming system of any kind, much less one susceptible to the "red ring of death"? "

      That was some releases of the Xbox 360. The current Xbox console is the Xbox One, which has no problems of the sort. The app is so you can interact with your Xbox One account and even connect to the console and stream Xbox One games so you can play them on your Windows 10 box.

      That being said, you do know that you can right click on those tiles, uninstall the progr

  • Why do all these reviews disable the UI? This isn't a review of Windows 10, it's a review of Windows 7.

    • by dbIII ( 701233 )

      Why do all these reviews disable the UI?

      To make it usable :(

      • Why does everyone assume "usable" is a synonym for "works exactly like the WIndows I am familiar with". The Windows 10 UI is perfectly usable, but not if you disable it before giving it a chance. This guy shut it all off on page one! Why review a new OS when all you're going to do is remove all the new features?

        It's like Phoronix trying to review Ubuntu by immediately uninstalling Unity and replacing it with KDE. That might be a fantastic idea for a user, but it's gonna make for a shit review of Ubuntu.

        • by dbIII ( 701233 )

          Why does everyone assume "usable" is a synonym for "works exactly like the WIndows I am familiar with"

          Because Win8 with hidden offscreen controls may have sounded "fun" to a marketing guy on cocaine but rendered the thing not usable without strenuous workarounds and guesswork.
          eg. Get to "Services" by a right click on desktop to being up screen resolution, then click in the "control panel" name in the location bar, then go to "Admin tools" then "Services". That's many times quicker than doing a search (once

  • The disk drive was acting up and it was a very old Win7 installation. So I replaced the disk, installed Debian jessie with KDE and Win7 in a VM. Everything is soo snappy now and I don't have to deal with all the Win8/10 drama. Yay. But I'm not a gamer obviously.

  • by sl149q ( 1537343 ) on Sunday August 09, 2015 @06:47PM (#50281485)

    Windows 10 with Classic Shell is an even better Windows 7 than Windows 8.1 with Classic Shell. Both are a better Windows 7 than Windows 7.

    I did give the Windows 10 "start menu" a bit more of a try out than the Windows 8 one. A full ten minutes (nine minutes longer!) Then installed Classic Shell and got back to work.

  • by RR ( 64484 ) on Sunday August 09, 2015 @07:57PM (#50281773)

    First, he complained about the download. I anticipated this problem, downloaded the ISO on Windows 7 with Microsoft’s stupid downloading program, and burned a DVD/USB. Problem solved. Also, you can buy Windows 10 OEM media in stores.

    Then, he complained about the updater not having a clean install option. It’s not obvious, but there’s an option somewhere in the installer to “Keep nothing.” This does a clean install.

    He did not complain about tying the Windows account to a Microsoft account. It’s possible to make a local account not connected to a Live.com, and it’s more obvious how to do so than in Windows 8.

    Then, he complained about the hybrid Start menu. That can be resized.

    Other than that, I guess the review was okay. I liked the part about the Hi-DPI experience.

  • Folks one thing WIndows 10 has going for it that is very revolutionary ahead of Linux or close to be being tied are cloud and profile integration and development tools. For example I can sync my IE settings, desktop wallpaper, saved passwords, app purchases, and more from my Surface and vice versa with my desktop. OneNote and Word have the same files since it uses OneDrive by default. Yes, it is bashed here HEY MS I DO NOT WANT A HOTMAIL ACCOUNT!! but man it is nice not to sync. ... actually this functional

    • by dbIII ( 701233 )

      very revolutionary ahead of Linux ... are cloud and profile integration

      The network is the computer!
      In case you've never heard that, it was a Sun slogan relating to *nix networking in the 1990s.
      To be more up to date there is current stuff like "owncloud", which effectively lets you run your own "dropbox" style thing without having to deal with third parties unless you want to.

  • *Windows 8* was a significant upgrade over Windows 7 - and Windows 10 more so. However, if you only care about start menus and icons, then, no, there's nothing to see here.

    I don't recall, however, Windows 7 having native NIC teaming built in, including on dissimilar connection types (i.e. natively team wifi and NIC). I don't recall Windows 7 having a very powerful Hypervisor built in, natively. I don't recall Windows 7 having SMB3. I don't recall Windows 7 having native support for software defined storag
  • by ras ( 84108 ) <<ua.di.trauts> <ta> <todhsals-llessur>> on Sunday August 09, 2015 @09:16PM (#50282035) Homepage

    I was so chuffed when Gnome and KDE beat Windows at its own game. For years they had been lagging behind Microsoft, mostly mimicking the look and feel of Windows. KDE 4.0 gave us a hint of what was to come - it was a mess. With Gnome 3 we had clearly pulled ahead of Microsoft, producing a complete clusterfuck of an interface in long before Microsoft got their own clusterfuck to the market with Windows 8. Finally, we were setting the pace and Microsoft was following!

    But things move quickly, and open source is falling behind again. Right now we are in the "ouch! that hurt phase" and fixing the mess created by the last fad. Microsoft has pared down the Vista "wow, we virtualised the 3D pipeline so everyone wants to watch ponies dancing on a spinning Icosahedron while their windows open" to something that almost always runs faster than Gnome and KDE in Windows 10. In the mean time people who preferred to use Gnome to get shit done rather than watch ponies retreated to Gnome flashback, or whatever it is called today. But, sigh, in a flash of recent inspiration Gnome made flashback depend on the 3D graphics as well, meaning you can no longer debug someones desktop using a frame buffer protocol like VNC, effectively ensuring that in some cases it isn't possible to get any work done with it, at all. Just fucking wonderful Gnome.

    Unlike poor Windows users, Linux is all about choice, and so putting up with a window manager that removed features with with each iteration while managing to run slower at the same time (awesome effort, boys!) is some ways my own fault. But the reality is the choosing the right thing from the many choices Linux offers you is hard work, hard work that Windows users are spared. I tend to compensate by sticking like deranged limpet to what I used yesterday. Kudo's to Gnome I guess, for finding a way to force me off my rock.

    Now I have a new rock: LXDE. While it may be true Microsoft has moved faster than KDE and Gnome to produce something todays GUI fashion Nazi's just love, if paired down, fast, and just get out of my fucking way is the benchmark, LXDE entered that race long before Microsoft knew even existed, and they now beat Microsoft at it hands down. Saying Windows 10 beats Gnome and KDE in speed as this review does is just plain dumb. Gnome and KDE haven't yet twigged they event that think they are competing in was abandoned last year, at the latest. Microsoft, to their credit did twig, and now they have Windows 10.

  • by tannhaus ( 152710 ) on Sunday August 09, 2015 @09:34PM (#50282095) Homepage Journal

    I've been a linux user since 1997, except for a couple of years when I ran OS X (10.5-10.6). I started out on Redhat (a couple of weeks with slackware before that, but too short a time to count), then went to OpenSuse after the second Fedora release and migrated to Linux Mint 17.1 because I found too many annoying bugs in the most recent release of OpenSuse. I'm strictly a desktop user and was waiting for the rise of the Linux desktop like everyone else, but always kept a version of Windows on dual boot because A. It usually came with the machine and B. "just in case".

    Yesterday, I installed Grub Customizer and switched my default boot to Windows 10. It is, to me, the best version of Windows they've managed to come out with. I happen to love the start menu. I did away with all my icons I normally put on the desktop and, instead, they reside in the start menu. The privacy issues seem to be no better nor worse than you get from Apple, but the OS seems to finally be as good as what you'd get from Apple.

    I have to say... I've gotten sick, over the years, of Linux being treated like the red-headed stepchild when it comes to drivers, software and websites. But, just as importantly, I've grown sick of the bugs that continually creep up in the desktop experience. Dilbert stops showing up on the KDE comic applet....search all around...no fixes seem to work....gotta live with it. Can't find an mp3 player that really seems to work, catalog my library, manage the playlists and mp3s on my samsung s3 etc. without hanging or outright crashing... It's the bugs like that which seem to really be in your face on a near daily basis....and they don't seem to be fixed. It's much more exciting to add features than hunt down bugs. I understand that. Some will say that, if I don't like the bugs, then fix them myself. But, I don't want an OS I have to learn to code and help out projects just to make something I can use.... I'm a single parent raising a 7 year old. I just want something I can use and that fits my needs....

    Linux Mint has been, by far, the most polished and professional desktop experience I've had in a while. That could be because they've stayed with the same release of Ubuntu underlying it for the last couple of releases. Whatever the reason, I've still found a more pleasing desktop experience in Windows 10.

    • I've had a somewhat similar experience.

      Linux was my full-time OS starting in 2002 (Gentoo for about 8 years, then bouncing between Fedora, Mint and Crunchbang). About four months ago I switched my main PC to Windows 7. I actually like it, enough to keep using it. When my laptop finally needed replacing, I went with an SP3 which has been quite nice (Windows 8's interface actually makes sense on a tablet whereas I hate it on desktops/laptops).

      Linux-the-OS is still mostly nice. Linux-the-userland reached its z

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Viol8 ( 599362 )

        "my USB headset doesn't work properly,"

        Who the fuck wastes a USB port on a headset? You never head of headphone and mic jacks?

    • > I did away with all my icons I normally put on the desktop and, instead, they reside in the start menu.

      Wow. I've been doing this since Windows XP.

      Also, once you arrange XP's menu in a keyboard-friendly fashion, it acts much like Windows 7's search box on the Start menu... except faster, since you only need to hit the first key of each menu item.

      I usually have "Quick" menu, at the top level of Start, with common programs in it, like Photoshop. Whereas, in Windows 7, I have to type "pho" or something, an

  • by williamyf ( 227051 ) on Monday August 10, 2015 @01:12AM (#50282695)

    At work or Academia, I had used all there is to use. DOS, Windows, Solaris, HP-UX, Sinix, VMS, Linux, FreeBSD...

    At home, it was DOS (3.2, 3.3, 5.0, 6.22) Windows (WFW 3.11, 95, 98, NT4, 2000, XP, Vista) all the way (with a brief innuendo with Warp), until Early 2009, when I declared my switchover to MAC Successful.

    Now, Apple forced my hand by not releasing Win7 Drivers for the 2015 13"Air... So, between having a ragtag fleet of machines on Win732, Win764 and Win8.1 64, I'll go 10 all the way.

    The fact that I can get Windows 10 Working on a Toshiba Satellite A123 ** (My last windows machine), with an Xpress200m Chipset whose graphics part is based on a chip (R300) released in Aug. 2002, and a processor whose architecture (Yonah T2080) was released on 2006 speaks volumes at the effort microsoft has put in preserving compatibility AND make the OS perform better.

    On the same resources, Win 8 will perform better than 7 and Win 10 will outperform them both. It has actually breathed new life into the old machine.

    What really interest me is the new powers under the hood. Better performance (as said before), Edge, better included antivirus and security tools, DX12, etc, etc, etc.

    Maybe things moved around a lot from what I remember, but is in no way as bad as windows 8, were I had to rip of the virtual machine due to the hotcorners, and wanted to pull my hair everytime I had to use a Win8 machine from a friend without a shell replacement. Besides, if one does not like the interface, one can change it (as they said in the TFA, Classic Shell works like a charm, and I am sure there will be other customization apps in no time), if they removed mediaplayer, there is MithTV or VLC, the app store is empty, so what, is not like I forgot how to download an exe or a msi file...

    But then again, I use this only for some games (currently Batman Arkam Origins, and anything that strikes my fancy that Steam has not ported to Apple yet) on bootcamp, and via VirtualBox on raw partition for Visio and Project.

    The fact that the upgrade is free sweetens and seals the deal (if I had to pay for it, or had to go through the hoops of the university to get the license key, well....). Yes, there are privacy concerns, and I will deal with them, the same way I dealt with iCloud and all of Apple's privacy invasions, I have the knowledge to do so, and I can relay on my fellow techies when my knowledge fails me.

    For me is a welcome upgrade, one that will bring homogeneity to my fleet, along with better performance accross the board, and I am recommending all non-techie friends to upgrade (after updating FW, maxing RAM and putting an SSD, of course), especially from Windows XP. Besides, I already issued them a stern Warning. After march 2016, I'll only answer questions about Win10 or "El Capitan". That will drastically cut the amount of free tech support I must do... ;-)

    Welcome Windows 10, you may not warrant a rolling stones theme song, but your low-key entry will make many lives easier...

    Suerte a todos y feliz dia.

    ** Yes, after firmware updates, maxed RAM to 2GB, and put a SATA3 64GB SSD on the puny SATA1 interface of the Xpress200M

    PS: For what is worth, I have CrunchBang++ for basic Linux demos to my students in the Toshiba (the machine I carry around in mass transport to class, because, if they mug me, I'll not miss it), and have A few CentOS and Oracle Linux machines for, you know, stuff...

  • by DrXym ( 126579 ) on Monday August 10, 2015 @04:22AM (#50283049)
    I've "upgraded" 3 machines to Windows 10, two were on 8.1, another on Windows 7. Of the 8.1s, one was a docking tablet with a fair amount of supplementary drivers, the other was a laptop which had a vanilla 8.1 installed on it.

    The laptop appeared to upgrade ok but upon rebooting was excrutiatingly slow and unresponsive. It kept asking for permission to run an activesync exchange app or somesuch and neither Windows Update or Edge could connect to the internet even though Firefox could. I suspect that the machine had family safety turned on in 8.1 and it fucked up on the upgrade. In the end I reverted to 8.1. I might turn off family safety and try again.

    The docking tablet upgraded fine but the drivers for the keyboard and touch pad are botched. I can't type certain keys on the keyboard and after a while it goes completely haywire. I'll probably live with it for a week to give Lenovo a change to produce a new driver and if they don't I'll revert to 8.1 there too.

    The only one which worked relatively well was the Windows 7 desktop which migrated and booted back up in a good state. But even here there are glitches - some of my tiles look like they've been cut in half and shifted over. All my software works and the desktop experience is good even though the start menu still has a lot of room for improvement. I also discovered that Win 10 has a setting (enabled by default) that allows Microsoft to stuff promotional tiles into your start menu which is annoying.

    Overall I'm not impressed at all with Windows 10. It was released prematurely as far as I'm concerned. From an administration point of view, it's also more of a burden because now there isn't just a control panel but also now a settings and clicking a button in one often leads to the other. It's a mess for configuration. None of the administrator tools seem to have gotten any attention either so they're not high-dpi aware for example which means they look blurred on a high density screen.

  • by dablow ( 3670865 ) on Monday August 10, 2015 @08:40AM (#50283617)

    ...Not unless there is some revolutionary paradigm shift in Computer Science.

    OS since Windows XP (or OSX) have pretty much hit their "peak" in terms of balance, usability and stability.

    Since Windows XP (or OSX) the user experience has not changed much (although there have been significant changes under the hood).

    I remember the days when a new OS required new hardware to run all the new goodies that where added (Think Win3.1=> Win95, Win95=>Win 98SE, or from Win98=>WinXP upgrade).

    Since WinXP, all we have really seen is incremental, evolutionary changes that get implemented not only with major OS releases but with patches and service packs (and whatever the OS maker refuses to implement gets covered rather quickly by 3rd party software makers).

    I expect this trend to continue for the foreseeable future.

  • by superwiz ( 655733 ) on Monday August 10, 2015 @10:13AM (#50284025) Journal
    maybe from a linux user's perspective or even a win 8.1 user's. from a win7 user's perspective, win10's UI is a clear regression.

A computer lets you make more mistakes faster than any other invention, with the possible exceptions of handguns and Tequilla. -- Mitch Ratcliffe

Working...