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GNOME GUI Open Source Software

GNOME Settings Area Getting a Refurbishment (gnome.org) 151

jones_supa writes: Allan Day has written a blog post today about some of the improvements that are being worked on for GNOME's settings area. The new GNOME Settings area is working toward a model that uses a list sidebar for navigation. The window is now resizable, and overall should be a nice upgrade. The new GNOME settings area certainly bears some resemblance to the Windows 10 settings app. Work is also ongoing specifically around improving GNOME's network settings, redesigned sound settings, experiments around improved display support, and various other enhancements to GNOME's settings area. For now, this work is considered experimental and all may not be completed in time for the GNOME 3.20 release in March.
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GNOME Settings Area Getting a Refurbishment

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    So why masturbate over it?

  • by Viol8 ( 599362 ) on Wednesday January 13, 2016 @01:07PM (#51293861) Homepage

    Try listening to your users instead of implementing whatever eye candy and widgets you dreamt up after the 5th pint and 2 shots the night before. Just a thought.

    • by ADRA ( 37398 )

      I'd say a good deal of their speaking users shed out of the ecosystem years ago when then adopted the 3 abortion, but that's just my opinion IMHO. I just dropped into the thread for morbid curiosity. But hell, if its better for their existing users then Kudos?

  • It looks rather good. As far as being somehow connected to Windows 10, operating systems have had the "list of categories on the left, control panel on the right" format for a very long time. Android's Tablet UI predates Windows 10 by a very long time for example.

    What I wish is that GNOME would focus on the usability of their GNOME Classic system (you need to visit an external website to customize the panels. I'm not kidding about this, I don't mean "You need to go to a website to download add-ons", I me

    • by jopsen ( 885607 )
      The installation of extentions from a website is really smart... Before it used to be copy this zip, there, do that, and hope for the best.

      The time from extension development to deployment of an extension with the end-users is much lower. I think that's generally good.
      • It's fine to download or perhaps install extensions from a website, though a built-in client would alleviate the need to depend upon Firefox with a specific Firefox extension (and that built-in client could also use a local repository rather than require the Internet be used.)

        What's inanely silly is the idea you'd configure your widgets from there. Why not right click and bring up a preferences pane like everyone else? Why do I need to connect to the Internet to modify them in what's essentially a comple

  • Do people really care that much about them? There's really not that much of a difference between them all. There's not even that much of a difference between them and Windows in the first place.
    • There's not even that much of a difference between them and Windows in the first place.

      The Linux desktops appear to have not yet discovered the concept of remembering the size and position of a window when the window is closed, and using that size and position the next time the window is opened.

      .
      I made a similar comment a few days ago about KDE, and was told the new version does that. Well, yes, but it has to be manually enabled on a per-window basis, instead of with a global setting.

      I could find the global setting to center all windows when they're open, and a bunch of other global setti

      • by caseih ( 160668 )

        As with Windows, this is really up to the application. Windows apps store this information on the registry and then request that size and position on next launch. Linux apps often do similar things, at least with size. Many apps are poorly written. But quite a few seen to remember their last size. Position is harder to get right because users may use multiple desktops so fixing the position isn't always the right thing to do.

        • As with Windows, this is really up to the application.

          Yet Windows apps tend to do that by default. All of them that I use do that.

          Many apps are poorly written. But quite a few seen to remember their last size.

          Very few seem to remember their last size, in fact not one of the apps I have used on a GNU/Linux desktop remembered its last size/position. So far, it's just been major apps like Firefox, Thunderbird, the KDE apps, etc. because I get too frustrated with it before I have a chance to move on to the more minor apps I need.

          So instead of the constant stream of excuses and rationalizations why a windows on a GNU/Linux desktop canno

          • by arth1 ( 260657 )

            So instead of the constant stream of excuses and rationalizations why a windows on a GNU/Linux desktop cannot do something as simple as remember its size and position when it is closed, why doesn't the Linux community try to fix the problem?

            What should it do if you run multiple copies?
            On multiple displays?
            On multiple servers?

            There's also another good reason why the starting position is calculated, and that is to preserve the ability to use overlapping windows. To mark/paste between windows you need to see at least some of the window, and the window positioning algorithms take this into account.
            The Windows approach where only the front window is active and positions are remembered pretty much breaks any mark/paste functionality, which is a big

            • What should it do if you run multiple copies?

              On multiple displays?
              On multiple servers?

              What all reasonably sensible software should do when faced with a choice:
              Ask the user what he wants with a default that is useable in all plausible circumstances.

              There. That was not so hard, was it?

            • by dbIII ( 701233 )

              What should it do if you run multiple copies?

              Understand that it's a second window of the same type and act accordingly.
              Think back guys, it's a thing that was handled well before this site even existed! Rob Malda wrote themes and applications for the a window manager that could do it FFS!

          • by dbIII ( 701233 )
            The have, frequently and for many years, just not in gnome where the feature just wasn't on the list of things to do. Take a look at the enlightenment window manager for one example of size/position settings being retained. It's been one of the features in that WM since the late 1990s and probably in a few others as well.
      • by dbIII ( 701233 )

        concept of remembering the size and position of a window when the window is closed

        That's one of the features of Enlightenment since about 1997. It probably has a setting for the centre thing as well.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      A couple of years ago, I thought it was GNOME 3 and Unity that would be most responsible for retarding the adoption of GNU/Linux on the desktop. Both are, in my opinion, fucking awful to use. I find them extraordinarily inefficient to use, I find that they look like shit, and their UIs are completely unintuitive. No normal user would want to use them, and no poweruser would want to use them either.

      But then systemd was installed on my Debian GNU/Linux desktop, and GNOME 3 because the least of my problems. Al

      • by SumDog ( 466607 )

        I don't like SystemD ... at all. But I'm also sick of people crying "My system won't boot .. crashes .. whatever"

        SystemD does actually work. It has a horrible command line interface, bad command line UI, does too much and is probably filled with insane amounts of security bugs.

        It does solve the problem of full process management (sorta...I've had processes that have stayed alive after SystemD killed them...which shouldn't be possible) and it has created a unified init file configuration (upstart did this th

        • by dbIII ( 701233 )

          I don't like SystemD ... at all. But I'm also sick of people crying "My system won't boot

          Yet sometimes it does not. Hanging on a wireless mouse USB dongle in one case with me, halting while trying to start ZFS where /home was mounted in dozens of instances for another. Those are both situations where an init system should not just hang there with no chance of user intervention. The previous system had fallbacks and allowed services to be skipped.
          It's beta software pushed as if it was release quality and

      • I am among some many users still on Ubuntu 14.04 and waiting for 16.04 or on Mint 17, waiting for Mint 18 so not caring much yet.
        In fact, I'm more concerned about whether the driver support will get better and the applications better and less buggy.

  • Does it remember the new size and position when you close it?
  • I like GNOME, I think the devs are doing a great job. I'm sure other people like GNOME. If you don't like GNOME then please stop whining about it and use something you do like. It really pisses me off that every time there's a GNOME story, the comments just get filled with off-topic moaning (yes, like this post).
    • by cfalcon ( 779563 )

      > I'm sure other people like GNOME.

      If that was true you would have met one IRL, at least once.

  • Resizable windows (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Dragonslicer ( 991472 ) on Wednesday January 13, 2016 @01:50PM (#51294191)

    The window is now resizable

    When this is listed as a new feature of an application, I think you might be a couple decades behind the state of the art.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I never realized how ahead of its time the Amiga was. Only a few short years ago modern desktops were near UI feature quality: singly-active, full-screen programs that you can drag down to get to another one. Now all these modern desktops are working on their version of Workbench. I'm so giddy with joy waiting for them to start meditating.

      The computing industry runs in circles. Learn to live with it. Ignore all upgrades and changes until it runs around to the part of the circle you like best. We're s

    • by dstyle5 ( 702493 )
      Maybe they will start letting users put things on the desktop again, by 2025.
      • Desktop icons are still supported in GNOME 3, it's just not enabled by default. There's a setting for it in the tweak tool.
        • by cfalcon ( 779563 )

          I have several problems with the gnome-tweak-tool.

          First: The devs just randomly delete stuff, and for a long time there was no tweak tool. Now that there is one, it's not really official in the way you'd ideally like. This means that in order to get BASIC functionality, you have to go dick around with the tweak tool. Given that most UIs are functional without a bunch of shenanigans, screw that.

          Second: Settings in the tool aren't guaranteed to be supported forever, and there's no amazing way that I know

          • The Gnome Tweak Tool has been around since GNOME 3.0, it's not particularly new.
            Settings are stored in dconf and can easily be exported from there. The tweak tool is just a fancy GUI on top of dconf.
            I guess the problem is that no everyone agrees on what Linux behavior is.
          • by KGIII ( 973947 )

            FWIW, I recently (past six months to a year) went on a rampage and tried pretty much every DE out there. There aren't a whole lot of us but there are a few of us who really actually like LXDE. Yeah, it's not fancy but it works, it's light, and it can be quite elegant.

        • by HiThere ( 15173 )

          IIRC, when I heard of the Gnome3 tweak tool a year or so ago (or whenever Gnome3 started being pushed at people) it was explicitly stated that the tweaks were temporary, and would be disabled in a future version. As I believed them, I stopped seriously considering Gnome3 as a potential desktop. If even resizing windows requires using the tweak tool, this sounds like an excellent decision on my part.

          FWIW, I have no idea what Gnome3 currently looks like. Nobody's been singing its praises, though. And duri

  • A large portion of the submitter's words were stolen verbatim from the second link [phoronix.com] without any attribution.

    • by dbIII ( 701233 )
      Since the link is included we can probably blame an editor for removing quotes or something instead of assuming the submitter made the mistake alone.
  • by Blaskowicz ( 634489 ) on Wednesday January 13, 2016 @02:41PM (#51294601)

    I've even tried the latest Cinnamon and I thought there were some paper cuts in there still.
    Although maybe a wider monitor (to get more task bar space) and a recent graphics card or GPU would fix some of that.

    Mate is predictable regardless of your hardware or whether you use a bleeding edge distro or a stable one.
    No hunt for applets : too bad if you wanted an ecosystem of little applet and widget things, but the built-in ones are dependable.

    • There is no reason to use MATE when standard gnome-panel does the same thing but in gtk3 with better compatibility with everything else.

  • I use Gnome, but I think one of the most truly ludicrous, flipping insane ideas is you need a freaking 3rd party app (gnome tweak tool) to change basic things like color or font.

    Whats even worse is the 3rd party app is some python scripted crap.

    Hello, I mean Windows 3.0 let you change colors and fonts, we're living in 2016 and Gnome still won't let you do what Windows could in 1993?????

    Whats so insanely hard about having a built in control panel pane that lets you configure basic things without hav
    • Gnome Tweak Tool is not third party. It's an official GNOME app developed as part of GNOME and hosted on the GNOME git service.
      • Then why is there ZERO integration with it? Why is it some python scripted separate app instead of being a normal control panel pane, like changing color is in every other operating system on the planet. Why do you have do a separate download. Thats it just utterly crazy that it does not have the ability built in to change color.
        • Then why is there ZERO integration with it? Why is it some python scripted separate app instead of being a normal control panel pane, like changing color is in every other operating system on the planet. Why do you have do a separate download. Thats it just utterly crazy that it does not have the ability built in to change color.

          Because it was produced by a bunch of deranged Gnomes Or is there some other explanation?

  • They actually had a settings window you *coudln't* resize??? WTF?
    I didn't understand all the hype & rage in the last 15 years [slashdot.org] but not having your settings window (or *any* window for that matter) resizable is abysmally retarded. I've been making fun of Windows for this shit for the last 20 years. What harebrain had the briliiant idea to make a window in Gnome non-resizable? ... This is really unbelievable.

    I'd be ashamed to brag about a window now being resizable again.

    • by epyT-R ( 613989 )

      Even in windows it's gotten worse. Look at the control panel in win2k, then xp, then vista, then 8, then 10 (the new 'settings' one).. Each refresh takes more white space while offering less functionality. This is an industry wide problem that gnome has embraced wholeheartedly.

    • by dbIII ( 701233 )

      but not having your settings window (or *any* window for that matter) resizable is abysmally retarded

      I had to buy a pile of new monitors after an inhouse developer made the same stupid newbie mistake. It's the "everyone's setup must be identical to mine" idiocy that also gave us so many MS Windows applications that would only run as Admin.

  • ... and for this reason, while some users left Ubuntu due Unity, I started to use default Ubuntu exactly because they've replaced with Unity (previously, used Kubuntu).
  • "GNOME Settings Area Getting a Refurbishment", also known as, "What Can We Fuck Up Today?"

    They'll 'improve' it until it's so ruined that totally unusable, and then they'll slap a "Done" sticker on it.

    • by HiThere ( 15173 )

      It sounds as if they may be making a marginal improvement. Not with any of the major things that caused me to drop Gnome as my desktop, but still and improvement. Of course, that's PR that I'm listening to, and the actuality is as yet unknown. (And will stay unknown by me, as they aren't fixing any of that things that caused me to consider them totally broken.)

      P.S.: I preferred KDE3 over Gnome2, and Gnome2 over KDE4, and KDE4 over Gnome3. KDE4 has gotten a lot better. Nobody seems to be saying that ab

    • by jmv ( 93421 )

      Settings are for advanced users, so we're getting rid of them. Using Gnome is now easier than ever!

  • MATE is more customizable, and has way less useless crap.

  • Funny thing is that Gnome 2 was pretty good, and ever since it has gotten worse and worse.

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