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Qualcomm Promises Gigabit LTE Speeds and New Chips to Power Smartwatches (google.com) 46

Qualcomm may have been losing steam (and jobs and sales), but it looks like the major telecommunications corporation is back in the lead when it comes to pushing out new LTE technologies. Qualcomm announced today the new Snapdragon X16 modem, which together with the WTR5975 transceiver, boasts Category 16 LTE download speeds of up to 1Gbps. Qualcomm also announced new chips that will power the next generation of wearables. Although you shouldn't hold your breath just yet, the implications could be huge!
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Qualcomm Promises Gigabit LTE Speeds and New Chips to Power Smartwatches

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  • Interesting Implications! first
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 11, 2016 @05:29PM (#51490017)

    This is sweet! Now my next smartwatch will be able to do absolutely nothing useful way faster than my current one can!

  • by Anonymous Coward

    The problem is who's going to buy them. Qualcomm's business was built to support a few large companies in high volume like Samsung and some Chinese phone manufacturers. The reason their sales are tanking is not because their processors aren't good, it's because Korea and China have chosen to build their own domestic industries around semi-conductor development.

    So if Apple's not going to buy (they make their own chips), and Samsung's not going to buy, and the Chinese manufacturers aren't going to buy, and

  • Let's get this term right. IoT is the Internet of Trackables. Anyone who says different is a liar. Our society won't be happy until all the HAVES will be in total control of the HAVE-NOTS.
    • by KGIII ( 973947 )

      Whilst I like your verbiage about the 'trackables,' I do have to wonder, who do you consider to be a "HAVES?" No, really? I'm genuinely curious. What is a HAVE vs. a HAVE not for you? Where's that line drawn and why?

      Are you not the least bit concerned about painting with such a large brush? Are you not the least bit concerned with prejudice that might be unwarranted? I imagine we won't know that until we have some good definitions. I'm not really sure what you consider to be a "HAVES" here.

      Is it the 1% agai

  • Great (Score:5, Interesting)

    by squiggleslash ( 241428 ) on Thursday February 11, 2016 @05:43PM (#51490159) Homepage Journal

    Gigabit LTE means that you'll be able to use up your entire high speed data quota in less than a minute, unless the carriers finally update their data pricing models.

    How is it that we've ended up with $10 for 10Gb or less of data now for about ten years? In the meantime, we've gone from inefficient EDGE to unbelievably efficient LTE, with HSPA+ available now for, what, the last five years on most GSM family networks?

    Yet the data prices haven't budged. The carriers have more bandwidth than ever, more efficient ways of using it than ever, but they still think they're running ancient EDGE or cdma2000 networks.

    On a positive note, this is more bandwidth than most people's cable modems. I wonder if the cable industry will catch up.

    • a Cable node has less users then 1 cell tower. Also what is the backhual from the towers?

    • So we should stop all wireless research because a country that is not even in the top 10 of Smartphone penetration has a mafia in charge of telecom?

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]

      The US is not even top 20 by internet access in mobile devices.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org].
    • Americans constantly whine about data costs, endlessly - as if it's somehow a magical unlimited bucket of data available in the spectrum.
      I mean, don't get me wrong, I'd like it too - but it seems only the Americans 'don't get it' when it comes to this. It's pretty straightforward, there's limits to it, period.

      How's this, in the last 10 years, what if instead you didn't have 4G / LTE etc, instead you just still had "inefficient EDGE" BUT unlimited data, all month long, endlessly?

      You can't have both. Especial

      • I have Sprint unlimited and regularly use north of 30 gigabytes a month with no throttling.
      • I guess us Europeans have no need to whine, as we don't have such caps. Don't recall ever having one (I live in Finland). The terms of service generally include a right to throttle the connection in extreme situations, though it's hard to tell if this has ever happened to me. There are so many variables once the traffic is outside your ISP's network. We also understand the ISP may not have a total capacity equal to the sum of customer speeds. But this has little to do with monthly caps, unless you only thin
      • How's this, in the last 10 years, what if instead you didn't have 4G / LTE etc, instead you just still had "inefficient EDGE" BUT unlimited data, all month long, endlessly?

        You mean... what if the cellphone carriers didn't take advantage of any of the advances in technology that had happened, and just gave us the same shit sandwich they were giving us 11 years ago?

        I'd be pretty pissed about that completely different situation too. I'd say to them "Look, why not use the new spectrum the government is open

        • The argument has never changed, who said you can't have the speed? You're welcome to it but you can't have 300GB a month AND fast AND reliable. Sorry it doesn't work that way.
          Fast, reliable, cheap
          Pick any 2 you like.

      • If Americans had better access to better (and better-maintained) landline infrastructure to homes and businesses and more free and secure Wi-Fi in populated areas, the demand for unlimited data over cellular would be a lot less.

        As it stands, companies like Verizon have monopolies over the landlines in large swaths of the states, and rather than using this monopoly to offer modern broadband that keeps up with the ever-increasing demand for bandwidth, they only offer languishing ADSL with early-2000s speeds a

    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      Gigabit LTE means that you'll be able to use up your entire high speed data quota in less than a minute, unless the carriers finally update their data pricing models.

      How is it that we've ended up with $10 for 10Gb or less of data now for about ten years? In the meantime, we've gone from inefficient EDGE to unbelievably efficient LTE, with HSPA+ available now for, what, the last five years on most GSM family networks?

      Yet the data prices haven't budged. The carriers have more bandwidth than ever, more efficie

    • I'm not going to start downloading enormous amounts of data to my phone just because I can, however faster LTE means that the data I'm currently downloading will get to me faster, and the network as a whole will have more capacity.

    • If you got 10GB for $10 in 2006 I am in serious awe of your bargain-finding skills.

  • ...it's the having to "charge my watch" that makes me not buy one. Until they somehow fix that, smartwatches will always be more inconvenient that convenient.
    • by swb ( 14022 )

      For me it's charging and obsolescence.

      A smart watch that can't do much on its own and can't be paired in any way with a phone because it is no longer a supported software release sounds dumb.

      I don't know if they did, but I wish Apple had built in some protocol primitives that while they could be extended, would also retain full backwards compatibility so that you could push basic data that isn't likely to change (SMS or contact info or whatever) over a long timespan.

  • by aphelion_rock ( 575206 ) on Thursday February 11, 2016 @05:52PM (#51490237)
    With potentially hundreds of gigabit capable devices connected to on tower, it will be interesting to see how the carriers deal with the backhaul requirements for the ever escalating demand on data.
    • With potentially hundreds of gigabit capable devices connected to on tower, it will be interesting to see how the carriers deal with the backhaul requirements for the ever escalating demand on data.

      How will they deal with it? That answer is easy. They won't. They'll just stick to their current data caps.

    • Decrease monthly data quotas, charge more and reap more profits.

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