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Chrome Opera Advertising Software Upgrades IT

Opera Introduces Native Adblocking, 45% Faster Than Chrome With Adblock Plus (thestack.com) 100

An anonymous reader writes: A new version of the Opera desktop web browser introduces fully-featured native adblocking which is able to load adblocked pages significantly faster than rivals running the Adblock Plus browser. The new feature includes whitelisting of domains and a benchmarker to test the difference between page load-times with and without ads. Krystian Kolondra, head of Opera desktop, indicates in his post that the company's hope is to encourage the 'simpler' and less intrusive advertising which has been promised, but does not yet seem to be evident.
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Opera Introduces Native Adblocking, 45% Faster Than Chrome With Adblock Plus

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    How about comparing it to a good adblocker instead?

    • by KGIII ( 973947 )

      Well, I noticed it a little while ago when I updated. (I use the repo and have the three channels, beta, dev, and stable loaded.)

      It's pretty fast, it's seemingly faster than uBlock but it's important to note that (I'm pretty sure) it's only blocking ads. It doesn't block scripts, trackers, and things like that. It just blocks ads.

      I can't say that I'm unimpressed. It's good for what it is - I've not actually seen an ad with it running and I have everything else turned off. I've only been browsing with it for

      • Native blocking is a good first step, but still, if Opera ends up getting sold to a Chinese company then I'll drop it anyway. But hopefully more browsers follow the lead of Brave and Opera.

        • by KGIII ( 973947 )

          It looks like it is going to go through. I'm going to be cautious and ride it out for the time being. I've got a hardware firewall with logs and I can run Wireshark. I'll have to see where it goes but I hope to keep using it. I do not want to have to change my browser - I've been using Opera for a very, very long time. If I do end up having to change things, it'll probably be to Chromium.

          • Vivaldi. It puts the Opera back into Opera. Not like this Chrome-skin thing that Opera has become.

            I also was a longtime Opera user and tried to deal with first Firefox, then Chrome after 12.5 started getting stale and it was clear that Opera 15+ had thrown the baby out with the bathwater. And yes, you can at least use Chrome plugins, but nothing so nice as Dragonfly yet:

            https://vivaldi.com/?lang=en_U... [vivaldi.com]

            • by KGIII ( 973947 )

              Oh, I have it installed. I've been using it, off and on, since an early beta. I'm not that fond of it. I just can't really like it, try as I might. It also has a show-stopper bug for me on a couple of different computers and I've described both the problem and given them the solution but they've failed to implement it and seem inclined to not acknowledge it.

              So, no Vivaldi for me yet but I have hope. It works fine on several systems but fails in some VMs and fails on bare metal with two different (fairly mod

  • Nice they keep upgrading their product, but some of their security changes have just left a bad taste in my mouth for Opera. Loved the browser. Had to move on.
    • by Cramer ( 69040 )

      Opera has been a Chrome ripoff for a long time now. Real Opera(tm) is INFINITELY better than anything else... the same set of tabs open in Opera vs. Chrome (and New Opera): 200M vs. 1.2G -- New Opera makes no meaningful improvements.

  • Sounds like it would be a great feature. Just convincing to use it is another thing. A lot of problems I have with Opera is it's feel. Sadly as I get older I become less resistant to change. I am used to where everything is and opera to me feels clunky because keybinds are not the same. Some of the convenience features I use although likely there now (not sure) didn't exist last time I tried. If I could get over some of those issue may give it a chance.
  • Adblock Plus? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by c ( 8461 ) <beauregardcp@gmail.com> on Thursday March 10, 2016 @12:05PM (#51671693)

    ABP is known to be a pig. A comparison with uBlock Origin would be a lot more meaningful. A comparison with a hostsfile would, of course, not reflect well on any ad blocking extension.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The piggyness of ABP is mostly gone. The issue was it used a CSS file to block everything and that file had to be reloaded for every single page. Recent versions of Firefox now allow CSS files to be shared across pages so now ABP only has to load it once. I haven't seen any comparison benchmarks on newer Firefox versions. Anyone got any?

  • who cares (Score:2, Interesting)

    by softnewsit ( 4396945 )
    who cares, it's still opera... and owned by chinese.... Vivaldi is better
  • What about Vivaldi? (Score:5, Informative)

    by evolutionary ( 933064 ) on Thursday March 10, 2016 @12:25PM (#51671819)
    While Vivaldi browser is still in beta (on Linux anyway) I've found it amazingly fast. It can use Chrome plug in and combined with the uMatrix plugin (NoSlash on major steroids) I've found it amazing .Made by the guys who created Opera.
    • I've been using it as my main browser for a few months. While I appreciate the effort to bring the old Opera features back, it's still not there, I don't know if they even intend for it to get there or if they'll work it differently. I can't have single private tabs, or list all the links on a webpage and filter them, set custom CSS per site, etc. It's also quite hefty in the memory department, which was one of the main draws of Opera Presto. As it is, Firefox is a better Opera placeholder than Vivaldi, but
    • Yep, another plug for Vivaldi here. It's also been very stable for something still in beta.

      I like my tabs on the bottom, my bookmarks/downloads/mail panel with the Opera-style whole-left-edge toggle, CTRL+N to make a new tab, etc. It's really the only browser that's primary mission seems to be going towards MORE customization.

    • What grabbed my attention immediately was the vertical tab option. But now with the new tab suspension and session management, it's looking to replace Firefox if things keep going south at Mozilla. Very nice additions to Chrome from a small company. I hope they work on the tab grouping feature (like how tree-style-tabs handles them, the folding/collapsing feature is very convenient), and one day allow greater tweaking of the UI. Impressive work so far though!

      Biggest issue is the non-free code... it's a cryi

  • I use a Proxy Auto Config file. It is a java script program that decides what proxy to use based on the URL. If it's a known ad site, then it uses a proxy that redirects to 1x1 transparent GIFs for all requests, otherwise it goes to the real web site. One great thing about this is that I can block based on the path name, so I can even block ads served by the same host as the real content, which you can't do with a hosts file redirect.

    If I notice a page is loading slowly, as I did with a local newspaper s

  • Add on which auto disable all video, overlays and popups on page with a simple set of buttons to white list where needed. Then whitelist is kept and reused on future visits?

    Maybe option to then share list with others.

  • it's a nice browser, but it's not really worth using vs Chrome unless you do so for the sake of privacy, at which point you'd be drawn to FireFox. The problem with web browsers is primarily bad webpage coding and we can all fix that easily by just not going to website that load slow or use too much ads. That's really the better solution. We the people train the marketand coders to work how we want it instead of just being sheep spending their lives running from once fence to another because they heard it w
    • The problem with web browsers is primarily bad webpage coding and we can all fix that easily by just not going to website that load slow or use too much ads. That's really the better solution. We the people train the marketand coders to work how we want it instead of just being sheep spending their lives running from once fence to another because they heard it was better over there. Sites likes slashdot and reddit aren't slow. If you can't make a site without too much trash I just don't go there. We shouldn

    • by jetkust ( 596906 )

      it's a nice browser, but it's not really worth using vs Chrome unless you do so for the sake of privacy, at which point you'd be drawn to FireFox.

      Opera extensions don't have the same restrictions as Chrome extensions.

  • Not as full featured as say Ublock Origin but you can disable by domain or site and uses the standard adblock lists.
  • Adblock + NoScript is my solution and so far it seems to work fine.

    Adblock kills the ads and NoScript kills off all the naughty little javascript bits that bog everything down.

  • without you-know-who pedding like there's no tomorrow
  • And to make things worse, request to add MRU is "won't fix" for Chrome, since "addons can do it", except that, they can't.

  • I have noticed more and more instances where ABP is inactive. Right click, and there is no "Block image" choice. In yahoo mail for example, unblockable animated ads now appear in the right margin. What's up with that??

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