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Japan Transportation

Mitsubishi Motors Pulls a Volkswagen; Shares Drop (reuters.com) 61

Reader Zane C. writes: The president of Japan's sixth largest auto corporation has admitted to manipulating test data on fuel economy (mileage test data) for 625,000 total eK Wagon and eK Space models, as well as the Dayz and Dayz Roox models produced for Nissan Motors. The tests overstated fuel efficiency by 5 percent to 10 percent. The offending models have been taken off the market until the problem is fixed, and foreign markets are being investigated for similar violations. Upon the announcement of the manipulations, Mitsubishi's stock dropped 15% and it lost 1.2 billion dollars in market value. The company apologized for the deception and said that it is investigating the employees involved. According to Mitsubishi, it was Nissan's in-house testers that discovered the discrepancy between the cars' published fuel efficiency data, and their real-life results. The affected models are sold exclusively in Japan.
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Mitsubishi Motors Pulls a Volkswagen; Shares Drop

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  • by MobileTatsu-NJG ( 946591 ) on Wednesday April 20, 2016 @02:45PM (#51950473)

    He who articulated it, particulated it!

  • lol (Score:4, Funny)

    by Type44Q ( 1233630 ) on Wednesday April 20, 2016 @02:45PM (#51950475)
    Just the names of those models merits his ass stepping the hell down.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by TWX ( 665546 )
      At least it wasn't "Starion". Given that the smaller car was "Colt", you can probably guess what the car was actually supposed to be called...
      • Given that the smaller car was "Colt"

        Had an eighteen year old cousin (the first relative I ever smoked-up with) get killed in one of those little sardine tins...

      • Yeah we get the joke... but it's not true. It's a portmanteau of "Star" and "Orion" and "Arion" (a mythological horse).

    • The Japanese use English in very interesting ways that sound ridiculous [wikipedia.org] to us.

      • Japanese words that are "English sounding" are part of their Katakana [wikipedia.org] syllabary. For example, "ice cream" becomes 'Ai su' 'ku ri mu' or Aisu Kurimu.

        Beats the heck out of English where we expect people to remember how to pronounce words like 'rendezvous' even though it only makes sense with French intonation and thus ends up yet another exception.

        In thinking a bit further about this, given that we no longer teach syllabic pronunciation in American public schools, and Americans are plummeting down the
        • Japanese words that are "English sounding" are part of their Katakana syllabary. For example, "ice cream" becomes 'Ai su' 'ku ri mu' or Aisu Kurimu.

          It's not Katakana syllabary, it's Katana syllabary. You take an English word, you chop it up with a Katana, and then you glue the remains back together to get the Japanese form.

  • They all did (Score:5, Insightful)

    by hawguy ( 1600213 ) on Wednesday April 20, 2016 @02:46PM (#51950481)

    Clearly all of the manufacturers used similar tricks, that's why they didn't point the finger at VW earlier. I'm sure they all knew about it since VW had such good emissions and fuel economy that the other manufacturers must have done tests and tear downs of their own to figure out how VW did it. But no one wanted to rock the boat and invite more scrutiny from regulators.

    • But no one wanted to rock the boat and invite more scrutiny from regulators.

      Benz might've had motive to; they were apparently forced to incorporate expensive "cow-piss-injection" and particulate filters..

    • This. It was a reporter who "busted" the story. If people think the Big Three are gonne get out of this scott free, guess again. That's why hypergiant penalties on VW won't happen.

    • Re:They all did (Score:5, Informative)

      by Aighearach ( 97333 ) on Wednesday April 20, 2016 @03:12PM (#51950757) Homepage

      There is actually very little that is similar between this and what Volkswagen did. It is like saying that a shoplifter "pulls a Blackbeard" or something. In this case, they lied about their fuel economy to increase sales. In the other case, they sold cars with completely illegal emissions and built them to detect an emissions test and cheat on it.

      Your claim about "no one wanted to rock the boat" is horse shit. The regulators who uncovered the VW cheat have been testing other manufacturers too, and nobody else appears to be doing that thing. The reason that nobody pointed the finger at VW is that they don't all buy competitors cars and road test the emissions. They test things like comfort and performance of competitors, they don't attempt to re-create all their regulatory compliance. They spend that money on their own compliance! That testing is expensive, and they don't really benefit from it. Performance testing of competitors they do benefit from, because it is more likely to lead to engineering insights.

      • Don't you think that the engineers who had to install expensive urea and similar systems in their vehicles to meet emissions might just be a bit curious how VW could sell cars without those systems?

        • No. Most of the affected cars had those systems too. The engineers probably presumed that they were using more of it.

          And to the extent that "engineers [were] curious" I would expect them to be curious about lots of things that other companies do that they were not being paid money by their employers to reverse-engineer. If the company was interested, it would more likely be in the form of trying to license the technology, not in trying to reverse-engineer stuff that will all turn out to have had patents-pen

    • Clearly all of the manufacturers used similar tricks, that's why they didn't point the finger at VW earlier. I'm sure they all knew about it since VW had such good emissions and fuel economy that the other manufacturers must have done tests and tear downs of their own to figure out how VW did it. But no one wanted to rock the boat and invite more scrutiny from regulators.

      True. Ever wondered why after the whole VW scandal became known - even though it would be such an excellent thing to capitalize on - none of the other car manufacturers did any large advertising campaigns in which they said "buy our cars, we do not cheat"? This is why. Keep a low profile and nobody will take a closer look at your own cars.

    • by EEPROMS ( 889169 )
      Actually Im wondering why everyone is getting upset over VW playing the software to get around emissions regulations. Emission Recall NISSAN ID: R1408 ECM REPROGRAM 2009 NISSAN ROGUE 2.5 AWD VIN: XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX EFFECTIVE DATE: October 06, 2014 Summary Some high mileage vehicles may experience higher than expected exhaust gas temperatures, leading to increased tailpipe emissions. Remedy Nissan dealers will reprogram the Engine Control Modules (ECMs) of affected vehicles.
    • Clearly all of the manufacturers used similar tricks, that's why they didn't point the finger at VW earlier.

      Yes and no. The manufacturers have a long history of not badmouthing one another outside of racing, with only limited exceptions. But yes, all or at least many manufacturers have diddled the emissions systems in the past, and it would be surprising to learn that only one of them (Audi, VW etc. being one company, after all) was doing it now when the regulations are, as usual, stricter than ever.

    • Clearly all of the manufacturers used similar tricks, that's why they didn't point the finger at VW earlier.

      The reason why those standards for diesels are so high is because US auto makers could not market a decent enough quality diesel passenger car at a sufficiently-low price with the performance Americans demand, and so these standards were put in place to attempt to prevent foreign companies from competing in the US diesel passenger car market.

      You hear US auto companies scream about CAFE standards for gasoline vehicles anytime talk of raising those standards comes up, but were and are strangely silent about d

  • Who the hell thinks up these names? And who the hell buys them???

  • There's a big difference between Mitsubishi and Volkswagen. Volkswagen spent an incredible amount of time and money developing software to defeat the test. Mitsubishi increased tire pressures. [jalopnik.com]
  • KIAs seem to be selling quite well. I wonder if they also are involved in this affair.
  • Actually, it would be more accurate to say they "Pulled a Hyunadia [cnn.com]," i.e., overstated mileage.

    Volkswagon's mileage data was correct; they were just spewing pollutants.

  • Now that Mitsubishi is in the limelight for being the latest car company to pull a Volkswagen... oh wait...
  • A Hyandi/Kia. Both were found guilty of this and both ended up paying like $300/car. Hardly their demise
  • I'm not surprised.
    Mitsubishi has been phoning it in since the '90s where their Automotive division is concerned.

    They used to make very nice vehicles - and Chrysler used to import them branded as Chrysler/Dodge/Plymouth models (Galant -> Dodge Challenger/Plymouth Sapporo - a very nice car for the time, then the Dodge Colt, Dodge's compact pickup trucks, etc.) and then the DiamondStar partnership was struck. Then they came out with the Starion which was a nice 2+2 "sports" car (a ponycar really) and marke

    • Then came the 3000GT/Stealth and the Eclipse. Then Mitsubishi quit caring about their auto segment - quality dropped, they killed the sportscars, and they started parading the non-turbo FWD Eclipse as a serious sportscar (despite inferior performance and crappy handling), and they have been getting worse ever since, and dealerships have been abandoning the brand for makes that actually provide dealer support.

      You forgot the Evo. I mean, it's gone now, right? But no one can argue that it wasn't a serious performance vehicle.

      If I could trade Mitsubishi's existence for any number of extinct marques (Saab, Studebaker/Avanti, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Saturn, AMC, De Tomaso Modena, Fisker, or heck, even Plymouth (with a product line distinct from Dodge's, like they used to have up through the mid-'70s - the Roadrunner/Satellite was sweet for a musclecar)

      And it was built on the same platform as other Chryslers [wikipedia.org], and the Dodges were available with a broader, better range of engines.

  • ...as well as the Dayz and Dayz Roox

    However, they went on to stress that the 'Chicken 4 Dayz' model is unaffected.

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