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Microsoft Stats Windows

Windows Desktop Market Share Drops Below 90% (venturebeat.com) 383

An anonymous reader quotes VentureBeat's new article about desktop operating systems: Windows 7 is still the king, but it no longer holds the majority. Nine months after Windows 10's release, Windows 7 has finally fallen below 50 percent market share and Windows XP has dropped into single digits. While this is good news for Microsoft, April was actually a poor month for Windows overall, which for the first time owned less than 90 percent of the market, according to the latest figures from Net Applications.
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Windows Desktop Market Share Drops Below 90%

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  • by NotInHere ( 3654617 ) on Sunday May 01, 2016 @06:11PM (#52024687)

    linux on the desktop is imminent

    • by suupaabaka ( 854944 ) on Sunday May 01, 2016 @06:36PM (#52024805)

      A few months ago, I was doing some work on the PC when my sister-in-law was visiting, and she happened to walk past and glance at my screen. Noticing it looked quite different to what she was used to, she asked me about it and I gave her a quick run-down of the OS (Linux Mint). When she went home, she asked me to help her install it over the phone, and now she uses it as her daily OS. Her partner's starting to show interest too, apparently.

      I'm hoping Linux snowballs. Free software (and I mean both definitions of free) can really only be beaten by quality, and I think Linux is rapidly bridging that quality gap.

      • by NotInHere ( 3654617 ) on Sunday May 01, 2016 @06:55PM (#52024891)

        I've installed Linux on my sister's aging laptop, as a replacement for the XP she had before. I'd warned her multiple times that XP was going EOL and that she should jump to an alternative, and after some time of nagging she agreed that I can put Ubuntu on her Laptop. Unfortunately the WiFi driver didn't work and the new shiny (and expensive!) printer she bought a few weeks earlier didn't have any Linux driver support at all, so she wasn't very happy with it.

        Recently she bought herself a new laptop, she didn't want me to replace the pre-installed Windows.

    • From the table, Linux is at 1.56%. So there is still room for growth :)

    • "linux on the desktop is imminent"

      Except for the fragmentation problem, the slowness of uptake is not Linux' fault. It tends to get installed on elderly PCs that "won't run Windows anymore." Small wonder that a machine so old that only XP supports all the hardware finds a lot of its hardware features unsupported by Linux either. So the geezer Linux system gets used as a file server or as an experimental machine.

      What Linux adoption needs is more new PCs that come with a good Linux distribution, like Mint.

    • by myowntrueself ( 607117 ) on Sunday May 01, 2016 @11:04PM (#52025847)

      linux on the desktop is imminent

      I've been with Linux since 1992. No kidding.

      What do I use on my desktop at home and work? Windows 10.

      Linux is great for servers, especially with virtualization; each VM does one thing and does it well. Theres very little complexity to deal with. The desktop is a whole different thing. There is massive complexity and variation.

      Way more software gets installed on the desktop than on a server. Way more hardware gets connected to a desktop. The interactions are incredibly complex.

      I had Debian 8 with a USB camera. The camera keeps disappearing. It doesn't with Windows.
      I had Ubuntu 16 with VMWare workstation. One reboot, no kernel upgrade, VMWare refuses to start. Never had this problem with Windows.

      Problems like this are resolvable, you CAN use Linux on the desktop. But the amount of work you have to put in to troubleshoot things like this overwhelms the experience. I don't have time for this at home nor at work. I stick with what works without me having to do a bunch of extra hours.

      The value that gets added by a proprietary OS is immense, make no mistake. And the likes of Ubuntu and Fedora really aren't in the same category as Windows or OSX

      • To each his own. I have six computers running Linux on the desktop and maintain three more, plus an RPi, soon to be multiple RPis. It's been quite a while since I've had any serious issues.

        It was this one actually: the Cloudbook from 2008 won't suspend to RAM correctly, so I have to use disk, and the graphics card doesn't work except in VESA mode. I actually bought the damn thing with Linux pre-installed but then replaced their crappy Ubuntu derivative with Slackware and then everything broke and the chi

    • linux on the desktop is imminent

      I'm assuming that was sarcasm, so little to go on... :)

      If anything gained, it was Mac usershare, which makes no sense, since Apple isn't selling tons of Macs.

    • I think you mean systemd on the desktop is imminent.

      It's not going to stop until it /is/ linux.

    • The big question will be whether or not it takes the desktop while there is still a desktop to take...

      Not an issue from my point of view. I abandoned Windows somewhere back there around the 3.2 to whatever transition. At this point Steam is gradually making even the thorny games issue moot, although it is still not the case that all games run on linux too (sadly) and there are still lots of games that don't run on steam (and which then require superpowers to get to run on linux).

      The two things that still

  • by negRo_slim ( 636783 ) <mils_orgen@hotmail.com> on Sunday May 01, 2016 @06:12PM (#52024691) Homepage
    And why is Windows 3.11 seeing such an uptick [netmarketshare.com] in use?
    • It's that guy who made 3.11 run on his Apple Watch.

    • And why is Windows 3.11 seeing such an uptick in use?

      Because the data is based on website visits, and Win3.x users have only just figured out getting on-line. I never did.

      • by ogdenk ( 712300 )

        Install something like Trumpet WinSock and Netscape 2. Pretty easy really. I never had to deal with it on my machines because I had real machines and better fully 32-bit operating systems at the time. Some of my friends weren't so lucky.

      • by AK Marc ( 707885 )
        I got online easier with DOS than Windows 3.x. Windows got in the way. Win95+ got it working, but networking under DOS was no harder than networking under Linux, and the WFW was just there to talk to NT servers, and didn't really get the networking right. Win3.0 worked better for networking, because it was a filemanager, and not an OS. Win3.1 was an OS (grabbing direct hardware control for real mode and such), and as such, broke some of the DOS drivers one could use for networking.

        For whatever reason,
    • by Ecuador ( 740021 )

      There might have been a change in their methodology last month. Apart from the Windows 3.11 jump from 0.00% to 0.40% (sic - they use two decimal places) going from March to April there is also a jump to 0.03% for Win 2000 when it was steady for many months at 0.01% and Linux had quite a significant sudden drop in the same month when its changes were usually smaller. An emulation project might have explained Windows 3.11 (although archive.org for example has been up way before April), but which popular emul

    • It's windows 311 not 3.11 ... haven't you been keeping up with their exponential release cycle?
    • And why is Windows 3.11 seeing such an uptick in use?

      Win3.x will have a user base probably ten times as much as that web-based survey, because most of its users will never use the internet (as I joked in another comment). It was unusual to connect to the internet in Win3.x days, only geeks did it, and even they were more likely to connect to a BBS. Most people only ever used their PCs for writing letters, keeping their finances, and playing Solitaire.

      There are old folk around today still with those PCs using them the same way - they (the PCs I mean) wer

  • All it would take is for Win7 to have a native usb3 driver supported at the same level as Win8.1 and Win10 usb3 drivers and Win7 would be the operating system of choice for the next 15 years. Both Win8.1 and Win10 work too hard to break the boundary between PC as a personal computer and PC as a cloud terminal. Win7 still has more functionality, as a desktop operating system, than Win8.1 and Win10.

    The flat-out refusal to have kernel level generic usb3 driver means that all hypervisors running on Win7 must

    • Re:meh (Score:5, Interesting)

      by vux984 ( 928602 ) on Sunday May 01, 2016 @07:00PM (#52024911)

      The flat-out refusal to have kernel level generic usb3 driver means that all hypervisors running on Win7 must either have their own full USB3 implementation or be limited to USB2. This is just an attempt to get people to upgrade from Win7

      The number of people looking at Windows 7 USB3 support as a hypervisor host is only slightly more people than "just you".

      • The number of people looking at Windows 7 USB3 support as a hypervisor host is only slightly more people than "just you".

        The number of people who use a desktop PC (not a laptop, but an actual desktop) and don't use at least some form of hypervisor (even if it's just a VMWare player) is shrinking with every generation of chips getting released. The more cores the machines have, the less likely people are to do everything in the context of one running desktop instead of going for different desktops in order to create an isolated environment for various applications. Containers are still much harder to set up than just downloa

    • >Win7 still has more functionality, as a desktop operating system, than Win8.1 and Win10.

      How so?

  • by FudRucker ( 866063 ) on Sunday May 01, 2016 @06:55PM (#52024885)
    is when microsoft really shot themselves in the foot, people are generally low info and naive but with windows 10 microsoft really let the joe & jane sixpack what blatant spies and abusers of personal info microsoft is, i can see microsoft's user base continuing to erode until they are down below 30% of the internet population
  • I just got my stepfather's old PC up and running to get some pictures and copies of some of the books he wrote. It is running XP. When I am done I will put Linux on it and use it as my garage computer.
    So I guess I am running an XP machine right now.

  • by King_TJ ( 85913 ) on Sunday May 01, 2016 @07:00PM (#52024907) Journal

    The stats on hardware sales for the last couple years kept indicating slumps in most Windows PC maker's sales, with Apple the only hardware manufacturer still reporting good sales figures.

    At some point, if more people keep buying new Macs instead of new Windows machines, we should see the OS usage stats changing for Windows too.

    I don't doubt a number of people also went to Linux when they got frustrated with things about Windows 10. But statistically, I doubt it made the dent that OS X did. (One of my friends just dumped Win 10 in favor of the latest Ubuntu, but he's already angry with some issues he ran into with it. So not sure he'll keep it....)

    Unfortunately, Apple seem to be its own worst enemy right now, since it's more interested in converting people to iOS on iPads than convincing them to get new Mac desktops or laptops. I guess anything's possible, but I truly think the idea that tablets will replace PCs for people is a big mistake. Think of corporate America, where people spend most of the day using a computer from a desk. Why compromise with some sort of tablet in that scenario? People want multiple, large monitors for better productivity and less eye-strain. That, in turn, requires more powerful graphics cards to push all of the pixels needed to run at those screen resolutions at a good speed. That winds up the weak spot for a tablet form-factor machine. Fast graphics cards require lots of power and give off lots of heat. They don't cram well into flat tablets.

  • I can imagine strange hardware or software reasons for using 16 bit windows, but what reason would there be to use Windows NT?
  • The Bar Chart (Score:3, Informative)

    by westlake ( 615356 ) on Sunday May 01, 2016 @08:28PM (#52025333)

    The bar chart clarifies things. Windows down a tick. OSX up a tick. Linux flat-lined as always. Desktop Top Operating System Share Trend [netmarketshare.com]

    More revealing, perhaps, are the numbers from Statcounter, which show OSX doing very well in the North American market, at 17.5%. Top 7 Desktop OSs in North America from Apr 2015 to Mar 2016 [statcounter.com]

    Statcounter doesn't break out stats for Linux, which is perhaps just as well.

    • The bar chart clarifies things. Windows down a tick. OSX up a tick. Linux flat-lined as always

      What do you suppose is in that "8.5% Other" ?

  • Windows Desktop Market Share Drops Below 90%

    OMG... But wait, that's not what the stats actually say. In fact, several older versions are dropping as Win10 takes over. But the simple facts are, Windows is still king.

    And, until software producers start building top-tier CONSUMER software for Linux, it will remail that way.

    Not just GAMES, though games is a big part, but also things like native (non-Wine) PhotoShop and other common commercial tools.

    • And, until software producers start building top-tier CONSUMER software for Linux, it will remail that way.

      I think you're wrong. I don't think Linux will EVER be king of the hill.

      But that isn't the point. It doesn't have to be king of the hill. For those of us who use it because it's free and open, because it doesn't spy on us, and because it helps us get things done, being "king of the hill" is irrelevant.

  • by phantomfive ( 622387 ) on Sunday May 01, 2016 @09:36PM (#52025595) Journal
    Windows isn't a major segment of Microsoft's revenue anymore [computerworld.com]. Because of that, they have gotten complacent, and don't really care much anymore. Remember how things went with IE when that happened? Expect roughly the same for Windows.
    • Windows isn't a major segment of Microsoft's revenue anymore [computerworld.com]. Because of that, they have gotten complacent, and don't really care much anymore. Remember how things went with IE when that happened? Expect roughly the same for Windows.

      They care about app developers. Remember they sell Visual Studio and notice how it is very multiplatform friendly now. Without Universal Windows Apps they lose out on mobile to Apple and Google. They want that revenue from the playstore as well which is how Apple beat Microsoft. 15 years ago I would be laughed at an oblivion at my last sentence. But, Steve Jobs won over Bill Gates with the simple store. Guess which legacy OS doesn't support it? Windows 7

      Oh, with the server, yeah the cloud with Azure so they

      • they lose out on mobile to Apple and Google.

        Man, they've already lost out on mobile, and given up on it.

        They want that revenue from the playstore as well which is how Apple beat Microsoft.

        They won't complain if they get revenue from the playstore, but their money comes from small to medium sized businesses, so Office, and now, the cloud is the huge opportunity they are chasing like crazy. Read the article I linked to, it clarifies a lot about the 'new' Microsoft.

  • Not that I don't care about this statistic, it is interesting. But most people don't care about which desktop. For a huge number of people they need a browser, and well that's it, a browser. Then they occasionally need to print what they browse. The other big feature they need is the ability to back up photos from their phone until their hard drive fails and they lose all their photos.

    Occasionally some people need to run Microsoft Office specifically. Or they need to run some software that only runs on w

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