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Microsoft Will Stop Supporting Windows Live Mail 2012 (office.com) 105

An anonymous reader writes: "Windows Live Mail 2012 users are on notice: Switch to a modern email client or lose access to any Microsoft email accounts they have," reports InfoWorld. In a Thursday blog post, Microsoft informed users of their Windows Live Mail software that "the time has come for you to upgrade to a new email application." Outlook.com is moving to a new Office 365 infrastructure which uses protocols not supported by Windows Live Mail, meaning its users "will not be able to send or receive Outlook.com email from Windows Live Mail 2012 after your account is upgraded." InfoWorld points out this affects users with email addresses ending with @outlook.com, @hotmail.com, @live.com, or @msn.com.

The Outlook team's corporate vice president posted on the Office.com blog that "We recognize that changes like this can be difficult and apologize for any inconvenience this causes you..." adding that "we are confident that you will love the benefits and performance of the new Outlook.com," and recommending users switch to the Mail app on Windows. The Inquirer reports that Microsoft also emailed the software's users, suggesting that "If you are using Windows 7, you can upgrade to a newer version of Windows to enjoy the Mail app and the other benefits."

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Microsoft Will Stop Supporting Windows Live Mail 2012

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  • Standards? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by QuietLagoon ( 813062 ) on Sunday May 08, 2016 @04:34PM (#52072043)

    ... Outlook.com is moving to a new Office 365 infrastructure which uses protocols not supported by Windows Live Mail,

    Soooo.... which one doesn't support the standard email protocols that the rest of the world seems to use, the new Office 365 infrastructrue or Windows Live Mail?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Yes.

    • by msauve ( 701917 )
      I suspect it's Win Live Mail. My work email is through Office365, and Thunderbird/IMAP works fine (and doesn't force you to top post, like Outlook does).
    • Um, both maybe? Dunno anyone who uses them so I couldn't say.

    • Both support IMAP. So the only people affect are people using microsoft proprietary software which uses microsoft proprietary protocols which microsoft is dropping.

      Maybe anyone this affects will think about using standards from here on out . . . yea, thats not going to happen :(

    • This is all client side. Server side supports all the standard protocols, it also used to support a proprietary connection method used by windows live mail client, that is no longer being supported. seems the live client only supports the proprietary protocol for MS servers.
  • There you go again (Score:4, Insightful)

    by ITRambo ( 1467509 ) on Sunday May 08, 2016 @04:42PM (#52072075)
    Microsoft, how come much of what you do these days makes life more miserable for computer users instead of making it easier?
    • The mail program was from 2012. That means it's ancient, decrepit, designed in a less enlightened time by people who may be over 30 now. They need a *modern* mail program! And then upgrade that clunker every year.

      • Yeah. There's no way that email could have been a settled matter in 2012. Clearly the innovation over the last four years would render a 2012 email client worthless.

        And these people need to get a clue and upgrade their Windows, too.

        • Yeah. There's no way that email could have been a settled matter in 2012.

          You joke but my email is still a cesspool of black-holed routing, spam, and a mush of various functions supported incompletely by various clients and servers.

          Email still has a LONG way to go for perfection.

    • Do you mean their not supporting legacy systems and code? Yet when Microsoft devs were writing bug fixes within their OS code to account for legacy software, they were chastised. You cannot have it both ways - you either support them supporting legacy code (and all the headache that comes with it) or you support them requiring updates. Both have significant security/cost implications.
      • by Merk42 ( 1906718 )

        Do you mean their not supporting legacy systems and code? Yet when Microsoft devs were writing bug fixes within their OS code to account for legacy software, they were chastised. You cannot have it both ways - you either support them supporting legacy code (and all the headache that comes with it) or you support them requiring updates. Both have significant security/cost implications.

        It's not both ways, it's one way:

        Did Microsoft do it?
        Then it's bad.

  • That's fine (Score:3, Insightful)

    by hcs_$reboot ( 1536101 ) on Sunday May 08, 2016 @04:51PM (#52072111)
    I stopped supporting Windows a long time ago
  • by Anonymous Coward

    - Errors about message having changed if marked read before deleting, so have to switch out of folder and back in.
    - Delete doesn't properly mark as deleted, and if you set effect of deleting to move to Trash folder, half the time deleting from there does nothing.

    I realise that most Microsoft development work is outsourced now, which means it's not actually written by people with a clue but rather thrown together and tested by listening to the biggest corporate clients and vaguely noticing the most important

    • There's a few good cloud based calendar apps out there! You should check them out.

    • CenturyLink's official position (according to a phone rep I spoke to one month ago) on Outlook 2016 is "we don't support using Outlook 2016 for mail." They apparently DO support 2013 and earlier though. Sure enough, the person I moved from 2013 to 2016 couldn't receive new mail anymore with no error messages whatsoever, which is how I ended up on the phone in the first place. I think "normies" ought to be pushed to Thunderbird; the learning curve is shallow, the integration plugins for Google Calendar and C
      • by puto ( 533470 )
        Really? Centurly links website begs to differ. https://internethelp.centuryli... [centurylink.com] They allow you to use them, but they do not "support" them in the sense that anything outside of a basic setup and troubleshooting. And guess what, they do not support Thunderbird or any of the Outlooks. http://www.centurylink.com/hel... [centurylink.com] You might want to hand in your "tech" card.
        • by Anonymous Coward
          If you'd actually read your own link before posting it [centurylink.com] you'd notice a list of step-by-step client setup instructions with Outlook 2016 distinctly missing from the list. You may also notice that the telephone conversation with CenturyLink isn't posted on their website, so it's not surprising that you're unaware of certain information that your Google-Fu may not reveal. There's no need for you to be a dick.
          • If you'd actually read your own link before posting it...

            How convenient that you ignored puto's first link that does show instructions for Outlook 2016. But to be more explicit, look at the email clients [centurylink.com] page. The clients listed with an asterisk next to the name are not supported by their tech support. Outlook 2016 is listed and it doesn't have an asterisk next to it. Therefore, it is a supported client.

            There's no need for you to be a dick.

            There is no need to be abusive just because what you claim is not matched by the written evidence on their website.

      • There were some bugs in rtm version of Office 2016. Users who had a working IMAP account in Outlook 2013 and upgraded would not be able to sync mail.

        I think there was a relatively easy command-line fix, and I guess it should have been fixed with an update. Will try and find the details later.

  • Another example of Microsoft moving relentlessly towards their wet dream of a walled garden.

    This is useless bullshit- there is NO need to move to a mail app on Windows just to send and receive mail.

    This is one of the most basic functions of the internet, and there are loads of full-featured webmail clients that work just fine, but that's not restrictive enough for Microsoft- they're going to insist that all your mail gets funneled through them so they can exercise even more control.

    Sorry Microsoft, I won't

    • This is useless bullshit- there is NO need to move to a mail app on Windows just to send and receive mail.

      That's not what this story is about. This story refers to support for a specific Microsoft Windows mail app being discontinued. I would say it's the opposite of what you describe, but it's not even that - you'll continue to be able to use other Windows mail apps, as well as the web interface, to Hotmail and Outlook et al.

      • Hmmmm, perhaps I read it wrong, but it seemed to me to that they were discontinuing one service and transitioning (read: forcing) people to their app-based service. (??)

        "Switch to a modern email client or lose access to any Microsoft email accounts they have," reports InfoWorld.

        and

        In a Thursday blog post, Microsoft informed users of their Windows Live Mail software that "the time has come for you to upgrade to a new email application."

        and

        and recommending users switch to the Mail app on Windows

    • Re:Useless bullshit (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Harlequin80 ( 1671040 ) on Sunday May 08, 2016 @05:20PM (#52072225)

      Kind of but not really. The problem is they tried to lock people in with the Windows Live Mail app and if you are using the microsofts servers via windows live mail it forces a proprietary connection method. So the issue isn't with the server, they support all the normal basic suite of email sending and receiving methods. The problem is they tried to build a walled garden with their software 5 years ago and now don't want to support their own crap.

      Of course they could release an update for windows live mail which removed the "force https stream / don't allow imap for microsoft domains" and the software would work with their server upgrades.

      • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

        >Of course they could release an update for windows live mail which removed the "force https stream / don't allow imap for microsoft domains"..

        Did they really block you from just entering the account as a regular IMAP server with the normal info you'd use on another client?

        • I believe that if you entered a hotmail / outlook domain name it would kick you out of the imap process and into their domain specific method. Its been a while since I touched that software though.

    • there are loads of full-featured webmail clients that work just fine

      To me, "just fine" includes the use case of going online to send mail, going offline to read it and compose replies, and going back online to send the replies. That used to be common when dial-up was pay-per-minute. It remains common nowadays on laptops to avoid having to subscribe to cellular Internet to read mail while riding the bus. In theory, webmail could work offline using IndexedDB and Service Workers, but in practice, I doubt that this works across all major browsers and all major webmail providers

      • To me, "just fine" includes the use case of going online to send mail, going offline to read it and compose replies, and going back online to send the replies.

        I sometimes travel between areas where I don't have connectivity. When that happens I just open a text editor and compose my reply, go back online and paste it into the reply window.

        Also, unless things have changed, Thunderbird allows toggling online/offline mode.

        • by tepples ( 727027 )

          A native mail user agent is supposed to communicate with the mail server using SMTP AUTH for outgoing mail and IMAP for incoming mail. But historically, webmail providers have declined to deploy these protocols

          unless things have changed, Thunderbird allows toggling online/offline mode.

          That's what I was referring to, so long as your mail provider supports Thunderbird. Many don't, instead expecting users to read mail in a browser window while connected so that the provider can show ads.

  • Will this be an opportunity for Thunderbird?
    • Too bad Firefox/MOzilla is trying to shed itself of thunderbird too. I hope it finds a good home, it's been my go to mail client for years.

      I did try evolution with Office 365 EWS and that worked well.

  • Surely, I thought, Microsoft had come up with the best way possible to terminate a service - initially give it the name "Windows Live Service X" then on termination change the name to indicate status.

    But here we find Windows Live Mail 2012 will NOT be renamed to Windows Dead Mail 2012, instead it will BE Dead while named Live. How does that make any sense?

    Well as the old saying goes, naming is one of the hardest problems in CS...

  • by DogDude ( 805747 ) on Sunday May 08, 2016 @07:02PM (#52072549)
    What is Windows Live Mail? Is it an email client? Did it come bundled with an OS? I've never heard of it before, and I work in a 100% MS shop.
    • by puto ( 533470 )
      It was a free mail client that replaced Outlook Express, that was released in 2007...
    • by ITRambo ( 1467509 ) on Monday May 09, 2016 @02:17AM (#52073803)
      It was a part of Windows Live, which contained a group of programs that were better than the ones built into Windows, that was upgraded to Windows Live 2011 and finally to Windows Essentials 2012, which you can still download and install today at http://windows.microsoft.com/e... [microsoft.com] . The 2012 version was pretty nice. Our shop used to install it on all the Windows 8 PC's that we sold. With webmail so popular we only load it when customers still on XP ask us to move Outlook Express over. Windows Live Mail imports the .wab contacts and the Identities email folders perfectly. Now, Microsoft had to go and break something else. They seem to be hell bent on moving casual consumers away from Windows. It really is odd behavior.
  • How modern is this client crypto implementation? If it lacks TLS 1.2 support, forcing users to migrate until it is too late is probably a good thing for them.
  • I really get zero spam and phishing emails. Only program that allows me to really control my email.

...though his invention worked superbly -- his theory was a crock of sewage from beginning to end. -- Vernor Vinge, "The Peace War"

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