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Intel Transportation

BMW, Intel, Mobileye Partner On Self-Driving Cars, 'Turning Point For Automotive Industry': Reports (bloomberg.com) 59

BMW, Intel, and Mobileye NV are working to develop autonomous-car technology, reports Bloomberg, citing multiple sources. Senior executives from each company will hold an event on Friday to discuss the driverless-vehicle initiative, the report adds. From the article:Jerusalem-based Mobileye has been an early leader in providing cameras, software and other components that allow vehicles to see the world around them. BMW has been a client of Mobileye, along with General Motors Co. and Tesla Motors Inc. As automakers and their suppliers race to create systems to replace human drivers, most companies are betting on some form of artificial intelligence, which requires powerful processing.Reuters, citing one source, reports the same thing. The announcement will be a "turning point for the automotive industry," Amnon Shashua, the chairman and co-founder of Mobileye.
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BMW, Intel, Mobileye Partner On Self-Driving Cars, 'Turning Point For Automotive Industry': Reports

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  • 1. Check braking and steering systems.
    2. Check GPS and vision systems.
    3. Check occupants for warrants and debt payments; lock out manual overrides, door handles, and re-route final destination as necessary.
  • The first "jobs" casualty will be truck drivers.

    Fleets of long-haul cargo trucks, going between a limited number of specialized terminals or loading docks, on major roadways and well-maintained commercial access roads, under lowered speed limits and other tightly-constrained legal behavior requirements, without tight constraints on transit time, are easier to automate than herds of passenger cars, and have an economy-of-scale at the owner level.

    Imagine a truck on a roadway, going from one loading dock to an

    • Imagine a truck on a roadway, going from one loading dock to another, as an elevator car, or a "people-mover" style unmanned train.

      Some countries (hello switzerland) have already replaced huge portions of the trucks traffic with actual trains.
      (Well manned train. With an operator paying close attention if anything goes wrong with the semi-automated high-speed train)

  • I will continue to drive my own car thank you very much. I spend the entire rest of the day staring at some damn screen or another, and the last thing I need is a self driving car so I can read Slashdot comments on my way home from the office.

    Wait.... Okay maybe...

    • >> I will continue to drive my own car thank you very much

      Fuck that. When we have self-driving cars I'm planning on picking up the highest-paying job I can find an hour away so I can game my ass off before and after work every day without any distractions from the wife and kids. :)
      • by lazarus ( 2879 )

        When we have self-driving cars I'm planning on picking up the highest-paying job I can find an hour away so I can game my ass off before and after work every day without any distractions from the wife and kids. :)

        You obviously have a much better laptop and a much better data plan than I do. ;)

    • I drive a BMW because I enjoy driving. I can't imagine owning one for any other reason.

      If I can't drive it then might as well buy a Prius.

  • by bobbied ( 2522392 ) on Thursday June 30, 2016 @04:49PM (#52421983)

    The best AI I've seen is stuff that uses techniques which are easy on resources.

    The holy grail of AI is something that can run with limited resources and give you reasonably good results and from what I've seen that's not beyond the state of the art today. In fact, I personally think the advancement in AI will only take place once we forget this foolish notion that we can field brut force algorithms for stuff like driving cars where the range of 'acceptable' solutions is pretty wide given a 6 foot wide car going down a 10 foot wide lane. We don't even do that for trains yet, and you don't have to manage the steering wheel, just the throttle and brakes on those things.

    Tell me, how do YOU drive a car? Do you have a better than HD set of cameras scanning the area around the car to 1/4" tolerances? Absolutely not. Why do we think we need to brute force this problem in order to do it on a computer? Something tells me we have over engineered this if Intel thinks they will be selling more processing power by being involved.

    I get the devil is in the details, but watching my 16 year old learn how to drive does not tell me this is problem takes huge amounts of processing power...

    • by Toshito ( 452851 )

      I get the devil is in the details

      Exactly.

      I'm betting that the first 80% of the problems of self driving cars are already solved. But solving the last 20% will be a bitch.

      And what will become of motorcycles? Will they be banned?

  • by Iamthecheese ( 1264298 ) on Thursday June 30, 2016 @04:50PM (#52421997)
    It's popular on Slashdot to loudly pronounce that strong AI is impossible. This is different from years past. I take the change to mean that it's coming very soon. As it seems more inevitable people who don't want change (whether out of fear, distrust, or sour grapes) will decry AI more.

    Now weak AI isn't just coming. It has arrived [businesswire.com]. And Moore's law was supposed to have stopped years ago but supercomputers [top500.org] and video cards [surrey.ac.uk] are still on a logarithmic slope for performance and price. The human brain is estimated to calculate between 100 petaflops and 1 exaflop [toytowngermany.com]. I know that's not a good metric but for this purpose it suffices. But as performance keeps doubling and doubling it becomes more evident that even the highest estimates are a question of a few more doubling periods. And the highest estimates assume direct one-to-one simulation of each neuron. Consider how many neurons are used for breathing, processing vision, and other things that either aren't needed in a machine or have already been done at a much lower computational cost on silicon.

    It's true we don't know everything about how the human brain works. But recent progress is undeniable in terms of success stories. Jeopardy. Go. Commodity trading. Corporate resource balancing. Piloting [bbc.com]. To keep shouting that strong AI is impossible is to only betray one's own insecurity. You are not special. Your brain doesn't run on quantum magic. You have no soul. Fucking deal with it.
    • by HuguesT ( 84078 )

      I agree with you that current results in AI are very impressive. However they are all achieved using supervised learning. Even reinforcement learning is a form of supervision. Strong AI requires mixes of semi-supervised and unsupervised learning, i.e. the system does not get all the clues before being able to generalize, and is able to learn by itself. We are not there yet.

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