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Windows Bug Microsoft Operating Systems Upgrades

Microsoft Announces 'Cumulative' Updates Will Become Mandatory For Windows 7 and 8.1 (microsoft.com) 275

Microsoft's now changing the way updates are delivered for Windows 7 and 8.1. Slashdot reader JustAnotherOldGuy writes: Microsoft's Senior Product Marketing Manager Nathan Mercer just announced that, "From October 2016 onwards, Windows will release a single Monthly Rollup that addresses both security issues and reliability issues in a single update... Each month's rollup will supersede the previous month's rollup, so there will always be only one update required for your Windows PCs to get current."

What this means is that individual patches will no longer be available after October 2016, and Windows 7 and Windows 8 users will now only have two choices: stop updating completely and leave your computers vulnerable to security holes, or accept everything single thing Microsoft sends you whether you want it or not.

Microsoft says their new approach "increases Windows operating system reliability, by eliminating update fragmentation and providing more proactive patches for known issues." They added that "Several update types aren't included in a rollup, such as those for Servicing Stack and Adobe Flash," and that "the .NET Framework will also follow the Monthly Rollup model." According to Microsoft's blog post, they'll also be releasing a monthly "security-only" update, but again, "individual patches will no longer be available".
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Microsoft Announces 'Cumulative' Updates Will Become Mandatory For Windows 7 and 8.1

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  • by turkeydance ( 1266624 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @02:34PM (#52738795)
    easy. thanks.
    • Exaclty.
      I wonder if someone has all the IPs used for updates, so it can be block without a fault at the firewall (not the "firewall" in windows)

      • by tepples ( 727027 )

        I wonder if someone has all the IPs used for updates, so it can be block without a fault at the firewall (not the "firewall" in windows)

        Do USB cellular dongles for PCs have a built-in firewall (not the "firewall" in windows)?

        • by c-A-d ( 77980 )

          The only thing I've seen close to this these days is on-silicon ACLs present in high end 10Gb ethernet cards.

        • I was thinking of a "real" firewall at the exit point, and on a private user point of view : the modem.

    • by raymorris ( 2726007 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @04:36PM (#52739379) Journal

      I absolutely understand why you'd say that. I've done that. However, the first thing the bad guys do when they want to break into a system is check for unpatched software. If you're running versions with known vulnerabilities, that makes things really easy for the bad guys.

      So what can you do? For me, I use Linux and OS X. Yeah, if you're the type of person who enjoys fiddling with the registry, there's a learning curve. On the other hand, if you normally open browser when you sit down at your computer, Firefox, Chrome, and Opera are pretty much the same on any desktop OS.

      • by geoskd ( 321194 )

        If you're running versions with known vulnerabilities, that makes things really easy for the bad guys.

        Windows itself has become an unpatchable vulnerability because Microsoft *are* the bad guys, and they have the keys to the kingdom. Enabling / Disabling Windows update is now a lose-lose proposition. If you are stuck with windows, your only choice is whose malware you want installed on your computer...

      • For the family, I got them inexpensive PCs without hard drives (a live boot dvd which I make for them so the printers and internal things work) and tell them to use that for going on line for web surfing, browsing, and banking. Everything else, use the normal PC with windows which is no longer allowed an Internet connection at the router (deny the MAC address for inbound and outbound packets, allow the internal network). It's not perfect but I've not had to work on their systems for several years now for mu

    • Given that Microsoft gives more headaches than malware, it may be the safest bet too.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday August 20, 2016 @02:37PM (#52738811)

    I guess they really didn't like people removing telemetry KB updates.

    • by daid303 ( 843777 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @04:57PM (#52739479)

      Well, I never cared too much about those. But I did disable all updates about a month ago on my Windows7 and my GF Windows10 laptops. Why? They repeatedly fail to installed. Causing a loop of "using 100% CPU for about an hour, reboot, fail to install, reboot to roll back, and then using 100% CPU again the next day trying to install the update again."

      After repeatedly fixing those updates, I gave up and just disabled all updates. (which was easy on Windows 7 and a pain in the ass on Windows 10)

  • by kbonin ( 58917 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @02:43PM (#52738843) Homepage

    Microsoft has decided they own your computer, so (&*#^%$ em...
    Been using Windows desktop since 3.1, mostly for work and gaming, helped move the games industry off DOS4GW to Windows a long time ago. And this sort of crap has moved me from Win 10 to dual boot Win10/Linux Mint, soon to remove the Win10 partition. I've moved almost my work onto Mint, only use Win10 when I have to run a Windows app, and the few left there I'll be exploring Wine or relocating into a Win10 VM. Steam provided great Linux versions of enough of my games I no longer need Windows, and my job is moving from C++ on Windows + Linux to JS on Azure & AWS, so no longer need Windows desktop for anything bur work corporate apps and have throwaway laptop for that. Good riddance.
    Will be helping all interested friends make the same transition.

  • by cdxta ( 1170917 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @02:47PM (#52738863)

    Great, now users can't block telemetry and other unwanted updates without disabling updates altogether.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      While I agree that is very much a downside. Patching is a mess today. Bringing up a brand new Windows 7 SP1 install and clicking on Check for Updates always leaves me with a "checking for updates" status for 12+ hours. Windows 7 has been patched so many times and it has been so long since they had a roll-up SP, that Windows Update is broken in its current form. It shouldn't be, but the architecture can't handle the plethora of things to check and dependencies any more.

      I'll begrudgingly accept the loss o

      • by Rockoon ( 1252108 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @04:26PM (#52739335)

        Bringing up a brand new Windows 7 SP1 install and clicking on Check for Updates always leaves me with a "checking for updates" status for 12+ hours. Windows 7 has been patched so many times and it has been so long since they had a roll-up SP, that Windows Update is broken in its current form.

        This is because Microsoft broke it on purpose to try to get more people onto windows 10.

        ..and here you are not only excusing microsoft for this intentional act of sabotage, you are using this intentional act of sabotage as a supporting argument for another intentional act of sabotage.

      • I'll begrudgingly accept the loss of control for a much improved ability to actually bring a new system up.

        I consider an OS that forces this choice on you to be unfit for purpose.

      • by unrtst ( 777550 )

        I'll begrudgingly accept the loss of control for a much improved ability to actually bring a new system up.

        It takes less time to bring an old gentoo system up to date. There's no excuse for this.

  • Third choice (Score:5, Insightful)

    by WaffleMonster ( 969671 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @02:49PM (#52738877)

    Stop using Windows.

    • by Greyfox ( 87712 )
      Easy enough to say but last time I checked if you want to do anything with the current VR headset boom, you're pretty much going to have to use Windows. Steam's OpenVR initiative makes it sound like you don't, but a few months ago when I checked their Linux examples wouldn't even build.
      • Well, you could contribute and fix whatever it is that is broken for you. Or just stay with Windows.

    • Stop using Windows.

      I did, about 6 years ago.. Used/supported MS products for nearly 20 years as a sysadmin.. Decided that when I retired, I was *done* with MS.. After seeing the "Windows NSA Edition" shit-show, I couldn't be happier....

    • Stop using Windows.

      That's not a choice for many and faced with the complexity of learning a new OS + finding and learning replacement for all the software, or just ... not caring about a telemetry update or two, the vast majority of the world will happily plod along with the latter option.

  • by davidwr ( 791652 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @02:54PM (#52738895) Homepage Journal

    People bought Windows 7/8/8.1 with certain expectations, including the ability to opt out of a given update.

    Having a monthly roll-up is generally a good idea for most customers, at least in those months with no "bad patches" (grrr). After all, that's how Apple has been doing things for its iOS and MacOS (formerly MacOXS) updates for years. If I recall, that's how they handled updates for the original MacOS (1980s-1990s) as well, except that it wasn't on a monthly cycle.

    However, to suddenly change the rules mid-stream is bad PR when it comes to business customers.

    At the very least, they should have a registry-key or group-policy that you can put in to "go back to doing things the old way," at least for "Enterprise," "Pro," and "Ultimate" editions.

    Oh, to make things worse, they didn't announce this until AFTER the free Windows 10 upgrade period is over. Users who kept Windows 7/8/8.1 specifically so they could manage updates individually are going to be calling "foul" over this.

    • Oh, to make things worse, they didn't announce this until AFTER the free Windows 10 upgrade period is over. Users who kept Windows 7/8/8.1 specifically so they could manage updates individually are going to be calling "foul" over this.

      It's still available [cnet.com] from the assistive technologies page. You have to vouch that you use assistive technologies, but there's no proof required, and under the circumstances there's no reason to feel guilty (but using the magnifier for a few seconds once a year technically qualifies if that's a problem).

    • by Anonymous Brave Guy ( 457657 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @07:37PM (#52740219)

      We've stopped installing almost all recent updates from MS anyway, since we basically now consider them more dangerous than not patching anything except clearly identified security vulnerabilities.

      My concern with the new plan is whether any machines that need a fresh installation after October will no longer be able to download the currently available updates of our choice. If Microsoft make the Windows Update system only work with the new monthly roll-ups and won't supply the previous individual patches any more, that would be significantly worse than just not offering any new patches outside of the monthly roll-ups.

  • I have no complaints, my computers work flawlessly.
    I look over at the Windows 10 folks, and feel a bit of pity and a bit of indirect embarrassment. But only for a second or two - then I get back to my work. Because that's what my PCs are for.

    • I also stopped after the first few Win 7 service packs - everything's running great. If it ain't broke, don't fix it. They got all the major stuff ironed out early. I have not had a crash or a problem in many years.

      This is fine for a home user who runs with noscript and adblock plus and is very careful in general with security. I wouldn't try to force that paradigm on my family or anyone not a serious computer enthusiast, however.

  • by lurker412 ( 706164 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @03:04PM (#52738949)
    I've been a Msft user since the earliest versions of MS-DOS, which means that I've put up with a lot of crap but kept on as things slowly improved. I have been burned by a number of updates over the years, so I install them manually after checking them out one by one. It's a pain, and some destructive stuff has slipped through from time to time, but I could always uninstall or fall back to a restore point if necessary. It would be nice if I could just trust Msft not to screw up my machine, but sadly, they haven't earned that trust. The choices are rather grim, as I don't want to forego security updates. I'm hoping there will be a large enough outcry that they back off before I have to move to another platform.
  • by SeaFox ( 739806 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @03:07PM (#52738973)

    we have certain patches that cause issues on our systems and others that are fine?

    Even if patches are all installed as a single block, there's going to be problems if users aren't remove individual KBs as needed.

  • Microsoft Update Catalog about time it's no longer IE only.

  • by ZorinLynx ( 31751 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @03:09PM (#52738983) Homepage

    Microsoft wants to make using older versions of Windows as annoying as possible for IT departments, to try to push us to move to Windows 10.

    Corporate IT departments tend to be the biggest holdouts for moving to new versions of Windows. If a business is running fine on Windows 7, there is ZERO reason beyond security updates to move to Windows 10. Now they're giving us an artificial reason: If a rolled up update breaks something, we have to roll back the ENTIRE batch. Even any included security updates.

    Microsoft wants their licensing revenue, and they want fewer versions of Windows to support. This is their play.

    • by rastos1 ( 601318 )

      Microsoft wants to make using older versions of Windows as annoying as possible for IT departments, to try to push us to move to Windows 10.

      So they think, that people who do not like forced updates and telemetry will resolve the problem by upgrading to Windows 10? That does not make sense.

      • No, but Windows 7 and 8.1 won't be "safe harbours" anymore, so the disadvantage of windows 10 will be smaller.

        Either way, I like it that microsoft makes so many windows users angry, maybe now they switch to in my eyes better alternatives like linux.

      • So they think, that people who do not like forced updates and telemetry will resolve the problem by upgrading to Windows 10? That does not make sense.

        It makes a certain sense. At this point, most everyone who hates Windows 10 and isn't allergic to switching to a different OS has already done so. Those who hate Windows 10 but don't want to leave Microsoft's nest are hanging back with 7. If the can give 7 the major disadvantages of 10 it will make it more likely that those users will "upgrade" to 10 sooner.

    • On the other hand, the IT at my university are the biggest Windows-boosters I've ever seen. Apparently never heard of anything open-source. Push "free" Microsoft trial products on everyone at any turn. Had the head of IT in the last semester claim at a department meeting that, "Windows 10 was entirely rewritten from scratch so it's much more secure." Updated all the classroom computers to Windows 10 a few weeks back.

  • by TommyNelson ( 2795397 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @03:09PM (#52738987)
    Microsoft says their new approach "increases Windows operating system's ability to send telemetry data by pushing such functionality even on those users who up to now were able to avoid them by not installing the corresponding patches."
    FTFY
  • Broken as shit (Score:4, Insightful)

    by darkain ( 749283 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @03:22PM (#52739047) Homepage

    With the number of absolutely fucking BROKEN updates that brick machines that have been pushed down the pipes, this is just going to send machines into a fucking nightmarish hell of instability.

  • From when they announced cumulative updates: [slashdot.org]

    But I don't see Microsoft going back to redo a patching system they've thrown out in Win10 to do us a favor, it seems far more likely they want to bundle it all from security patching to ads to telemetry to nagware.

    Still hoping there will be separate KBs that you can install/uninstall for corporate/expert users and that the cumulative update is just what they push on the update site but since they've become plain evil lately it's hard to say.

  • Corporate clients (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Kindaian ( 577374 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @04:00PM (#52739199) Homepage

    will be jumping of joy with this.

    Lets break all our business applications due to an update that can't be tested before hand and that is mandatory.

    Just great.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    It would have been nice if the submitter and Slashdot editor would have taken the time to actually read/report the rest of the blog posting:

    "Security-only updates
    Also from October 2016 onwards, Windows will release a single Security-only update. This update collects all of the security patches for that month into a single update. Unlike the Monthly Rollup, the Security-only update will only include new security patches that are released for that month"

    That sounds like a good solution for the rest of us who

  • by jfdavis668 ( 1414919 ) on Saturday August 20, 2016 @04:43PM (#52739405)
    Supported, but the normal way. Not this crap.
    • It's only supported for another 6 months. Thankfully, the only reason I need Windows is for games... and the security updates aren't critical there, as long as you keep it off the internet. (yay single-player)
      Hopefully by the time I build my next box it'll be the Year of Linux Gaming. ...But I figure I'll have enough power to run the games under WINE or in a VM by then.
  • So much for trying to blacklist just the telemetry updates then...

  • my friend Mr. firewall would like to have a discussion with you.
  • With this kind of attitude, I think its probably a good time for a non-microsoft influenced operating system to make its move into microsoft's bread and butter.
  • the monthly patch includes Windows 10 - whether you want it or not?

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