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Amazon Customers Can Now Return Things For Free At Kohl's Or Whole Foods (mashable.com) 47

In addition to any of the hundreds of Whole Foods supermarkets across the country, certain Kohl's stores will now accept returns of "eligible items" as part of a retail partnership between the two companies that began earlier this summer. Mashable reports: Starting next month, more than 80 Kohl's locations in the Chicago and Los Angeles area will begin packing and shipping returns back to the online shopping giant's warehouses free of charge. The stores will even have specially designated parking spots for Amazon returns customers. In exchange, Kohl's is hoping that some of the people this program draws into its stores will be tempted to buy something there along the way. One recent UPS survey found that around 70 percent of consumers tend to make new purchases in the course of returning items in stores. The new array of return options will also help Amazon undercut its arch-rival Walmart, which has staked its big push to catch up with Amazon on the idea that its thousands of stores can serve as waypoints for pick-ups, returns, and more convenient delivery.
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Amazon Customers Can Now Return Things For Free At Kohl's Or Whole Foods

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  • I've only done one return to Amazon, a wrong model phone. The return was free for me. I just had to go to a UPS place instead of a Kohls to ship it off. What returns are not free?

    • What returns are not free?

      Returns where there isn't a problem with the item and you want to return it because you don't like it, no longer need it, ordered by mistake, etc.? Returns that are Amazon's/the seller's fault are comped, but other returns (most of which are allowed, subject to the item's/category's return policy) are not.

    • Amazon partnering with a big box store is new. Try on some clothes while you're there, order from amazon.

      I have some KSS stock for the dividend, and I'm encouraged about store traffic, but Amazon could turn them into a zombie USPS with tangible floor models.

      It's new and dangerous.

      Dividend is over 6%, which might last till bankruptcy.

      • Some people were complaining about a new Kohls going into a high-traffic area causing more traffic. I told them not to worry, Kohls will be gone in less than three years.

    • If you return something just because you don’t want it after all then you get to pay shipping.
  • Scan a label, tape it to the box, drop it off at UPS, profit... errr, get a refund shortly after it's scanned. You just have to keep a few Amazon boxes around.

    • You just have to keep a few Amazon boxes around.

      You don't even have to do that. I've only done a return to Amazon once, but the UPS store provided the box and packing material for me at no cost when I did.

  • was a real estate play?
  • by Obfuscant ( 592200 ) on Wednesday September 20, 2017 @10:05PM (#55235911)

    One recent UPS survey found that around 70 percent of consumers tend to make new purchases in the course of returning items in stores.

    And many other surveys find that people go to brick and mortar stores to browse and see product in person and then go online to buy it from a cheaper source. The only time I buy something else from a brick and mortar after a return is if I am returning something THEY sold me and I am getting store credit.

    Either Kohls is expecting that their super fantastic sale prices on loss-leaders will get Amazon customers to buy (which means a loss overall), or they have ignored the fact that the customers they are counting on to buy from them after returning an Amazon product are well aware of how to buy things from online stores and already have a purchasing account with at least one of them.

    Did UPSs surveys take into account that Amazon customers have Amazon accounts already and know how to check out prices online, or were they biased because they included online-phobes who only buy from B&M?

    • by markus ( 2264 )

      And many other surveys find that people go to brick and mortar stores to browse and see product in person and then go online to buy it from a cheaper source.

      That does happen. But for me it is very rarely. More commonly, I do all my research online. Much easier to do, much more useful information readily available, and much larger inventory. Coincidentally, 80% of my research happens on Amazon. Their website is really good for that.

      When I am done researching, I decide whether I need the item right away; and then I'll pop over to my local Target, Walgreens, or Costco. If it can wait, I'll order it with Amazon Prime and it'll show up in the next two to four days (

      • I was talking about consumers in general, not specifically you or me. Anecdotal individual evidence doesn't change, however, the tendencies of many other people. I rarely go to the B&M to research anything, but I often find myself seeing something on a shelf that I will investigate later. And specific to Kohls, if something isn't a heavy loss-leader or on big discount, I don't buy anything from them. The last time I was in one at all was because I had gotten a gift certificate. That taught me about thei
        • If there is a prohibition against taking pictures of merchandise it is really just a way of intimidating people into putting their phones away. Women respond to that type of coercion.

          • If there is a prohibition against taking pictures of merchandise it is really just a way of intimidating people into putting their phones away.

            They had no problem with people using their phones to chat, so no, this wasn't just a way to get people to put them away.

            Women respond to that type of coercion.

            Yeah, whatever.

      • I'm more like you. Actually going to a physical store eliminates most of the advantages of online shopping, so if I'm going to all the hassle to go to a store, I'm going to be buying it from that store.

        • Most people only make around $50k a year or less. They will save $10 where they can and will blow $2 in gas to do it.

    • by lucm ( 889690 )

      people go to brick and mortar stores to browse and see product in person and then go online to buy it from a cheaper source

      I don't get it. Spend an hour to go fuck around at Best Buy touching shit covered with the sweat of countless strangers, then head back home to order the same thing online from Amazon (which will probably be a refurb), then wait a couple days, and either be home to receive the package or head to the UPS dump with a delivery notice to get your stuff.

      Your time isn't worth much if you do that. But again, some people make their own deodorant and toothpaste to save money so maybe it does happen.

    • To me at least, it's pretty obvious... Most people prefer to buy clothes in-store, whereas they will buy most other things online. When they go to return a toaster they bought on Amazon to Kohls, they might buy a shirt at the Kohls. Additionally, people will likely do exactly what they do now at Kohls - buy the "loss-leaders" as you mention, but, also buy their overpriced items as well. Overall, smart move at Kohls assuming my anecdotal experience is right that most (many?) people prefer to buy clothes in s

    • Kohls' customers are all Amazon addicts. How or why Kohls went for this, I can only guess that Amazon is in for a bigger deal to acquire them later. Kohls is dead.

    • Guess who else has a "Target" painted on them?

    • if I am returning something THEY sold me and I am getting store credit.

      If all I'm getting is store credit, then I don't do the return (and am less likely to shop at the store in the future). I sell the item myself. At least I'll get some cash for it that way.

  • by dkcs ( 684705 )
    I would suspect Amazon is going to use their fleet of Flex drivers in Los Angeles to pick these returns up as part of their normal block assignment and cut UPS out of the picture entirely to save the return shipping costs. Amazon has been surveying their drivers the last few months in LA to see which ones have bigger vehicles with the promise of longer block times. At $18 per hour for a Flex driver with no benefits it's a hell of a lot cheaper than paying UPS a fee for every package.
  • Walmart stands no chance of competing so long as they maintain such a god awful depressing atmosphere staffed and patroned by the trashiest humans to ever live.
    • I dunno about that. I share your disdain for Wal-Mart, but they always look busy when I drive by one.

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