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Facebook Social Networks

Facebook Competitor Orkut Relaunches as 'Hello' (bloombergquint.com) 103

An anonymous reader quotes Bloomberg: In 2004, one of the world's most popular social networks, Orkut, was founded by a former Google employee named Orkut Buyukkokten... Orkut was shut down by Google in 2014, but in its heyday, the network had hit 300 million users around the world... "Hello.com is a spiritual successor of Orkut.com," Buyukkokten told BloombergQuint... "People have lost trust in social networks and the main reason is social media services today don't put the users first. They put advertisers, brands, third parties, shareholders before the users," Buyukkokten said. "They are also not transparent about practices. The privacy policy and terms of services are more like black boxes. How many users actually read them?"

Buyukkokten said users need to be educated about these things and user consent is imperative in such situations when data is shared by such platforms. "On Hello, we do not share data with third parties. We have our own registration and login and so the data doesn't follow you anywhere," he said. "You don't need to sell user data in order to be profitable or make money."

Facebook Competitor Orkut Relaunches as 'Hello'

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  • by martok ( 7123 ) on Saturday April 14, 2018 @07:51PM (#56438907)

    Posting my status updates and photos into yet another company's database doesn't appeal in the slightest. Put aside for the moment that they could be bought up and have their privacy policy changed. The inevitable data breach will expose my data in the end. There's a lot of talk about how Facebook sells our data to third parties. But how about why they are keeping it for so long in the first place?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      There's a lot of talk about how Facebook sells our data to third parties.

      Facebook says they *DO NOT* sell your information.

      They *GIVE IT AWAY TO ANYONE WHO WANTS TO ADVERTISE ON FACEBOOK*.

      Big difference!!!

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward
        giving in exchange for something, i.e. paid advertising IS SELLING.
        • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

          giving in exchange for something, i.e. paid advertising IS SELLING.

          I think the Facebook's attempted sleight-of-hand here is they are claiming they are not selling the user data itself, they are selling the advertising space. The user data is being given to those clients, but Facebook is trying to pretend it's okay if it's a "complimentary service" and not technically billed.

          • The user data is being given to those clients

            No it isn't. The clients specify the profile of the users they want to reach, and Facebook uses the data it has collected to place those ads. They do not sell the data to their advertising clients, they only sell access to specified segments of their users.

            They would be foolish to sell the data itself, since they could only sell that once.

            All this, of course, is not considering leaks.

            • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

              As the Cambridge Analytica case shows, they do sell access to the data. Maybe not your actual photos, but things like your name, gender, where you live, where you work, who you know and the nature of your relationships with them, your political views and affiliations, what stuff you are shopping for right now etc.

              They can sell on-going access to it because their customers are interested in how people's behaviour and views change over time. They want to target individuals and then see what the result of thei

              • by ShanghaiBill ( 739463 ) on Sunday April 15, 2018 @08:14AM (#56440491)

                As the Cambridge Analytica case shows, they do sell access to the data.

                Facebook did not sell any data to Cambridge Analytica.

                Facebook allowed university researchers limited access to user data. This was done at no cost, so there was no "selling". Those researchers then used the limited data with screen scrapers to get additional information on users, and then one or more of the researchers (not Facebook) passed the information on to Cambridge Analytica in blatant violation of their agreement with Facebook.

                Facebook was certainly careless and incompetent, but they didn't "sell" data, nor did they intend for most of the user data to be seen by anyone outside Facebook.

      • Facebook and Google don't (intentionally) sell your information, because if they sell it then someone else can offer services that currently only they can offer. Instead they offer services that use that information, which often end up leaking that information.
  • Their pledge is "user first", but the relevant method to forecast privacy behavior beyond words is economy: who pays?

    • by AHuxley ( 892839 )
      User is always the product.
      • User is always the product.

        Indeed. Monetizing these incredibly popular social platforms is the most distasteful part of the process. Sell users information, or tolerate intrusive advertisements.

        Given the recent telling-if-you-read-between-the-lines Congressional (capitalized reluctantly) debriefing of the facebook's founder, pay-for-play social media is under consideration... folks who spend US$100+ on cable they almost never watch are bristling at the mere thought of paying dollars a month for the hundred hours they spend each month

  • WTF? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday April 14, 2018 @07:56PM (#56438921)

    It's not even a site... hello.com only talks about downloading some fucking "app". I have no phone. This is bullshit. And not a word about it in the summary... Retarded news.

    • Re:WTF? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Tough Love ( 215404 ) on Saturday April 14, 2018 @08:00PM (#56438933)

      I have no phone. This is bullshit.

      They evidently feel that you, as a member of the PC-using minority, are expendable.

      • I have no phone. This is bullshit.

        They evidently feel that you, as a member of the PC-using minority, are expendable.

        Fair enough given they are even more expendable as yet another social media platform. But if PC users are a minority then what does that make iPhone users with an even smaller userbase?

      • A smartphone app lets them track your location, see your cell number, email address, grab your friends list, etc.

        A desktop browser gives them none of that information.

    • Worse, it's probably an app with an HTML/Javascript based UI. Good luck distracting people at work, if it's not available on PC.

    • Getting really tired of what ought to be a standard web interface demanding instead that I must install their special "app". I *do* have a phone, but I still don't want yet another special "app" running in the background for just one more special website.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Unfortunate deployment method. It refuses to be available unless I install it on a smartphone, but I must get a download link by sending an SMS text. If I go to an app store for software that's been vetted as safe to install, I counted eight diferent apps named "Hello" before I gave up trying to find a safe version of their software.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Yet.

    Eventually they all sell your data. There's just too much money at stake.

  • by 93 Escort Wagon ( 326346 ) on Saturday April 14, 2018 @09:02PM (#56439127)

    That it eventually got shut down, and nobody cared.

    • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

      That it eventually got shut down, and nobody cared.

      They are hedging their bets on the idea Facebook's time in the sun is ending. Social networks were folding before because Facebook became the de facto one. Now with a mass exodus possible, someone wants to be the "place everyone moves to".

      If the King is dying, a new battle for the throne is about to begin.

    • I was a fairly active Orkut user when it came out.

      If memory serves, the problem was that language requirements weren't enforced. Apparently Orkut was very popular with Brazilians, so most groups were overrun by Portuguese speakers -- even groups that had English listed as a requirement. English speakers abandoned Orkut, and the platform was forgotten by North American media.

  • by ArhcAngel ( 247594 ) on Saturday April 14, 2018 @09:06PM (#56439137)
    There are several competitors that are fighting to be the new facebook. I looked at several of them and they are already getting traction. I like the look of MeWe [mewe.com] best so far but I'm keeping my eye on a few of the others.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Isn't MeWe a Chinese site? [alltechasia.com] ...yeah, I'm sure they really take user privacy seriously... e_e

  • The idea of a centralized service for building social networks is intrinsically defective. Social networks should be distributed, with no single point of failure or control, no single point to monetize users, and no single point to compromise privacy. What we need if we really care about privacy and individual control is some combination of web-of-trust, digital signatures, blockchain, and peer to peer networking.

  • by ZorinLynx ( 31751 ) on Saturday April 14, 2018 @10:30PM (#56439351) Homepage

    There is no web version of it to use on a computer.

    If I'm sitting in front of my computer already, I don't want to have to use my phone just to access a site.

    • "On Hello, we do not share data with third parties. We have our own registration and login and so the data doesn't follow you anywhere,"

      I don't think the founder understands the internet.

      By requiring us to have an iTunes account or a Google Play account in order to download the app, he's effectively forcing us to share our information with Apple or Google and get us flagged as Hello users.

      Not allowing us to download the app and install it as a third party app (at least on Android) was a very deliberate decision on his part. Me thinks this guy's PR firm simply noticed the PR disaster that Zuckerberg just went through and decided to capitaliz

    • >"There is no web version of it to use on a computer."

      Yep, I came to comments to post that, myself. I can't believe it! A phone app ONLY? If you want to leak ALL your data to some company, forcing an "app" is the best way to do it right now.

    • There is no web version of it to use on a computer.

      While true that's an incredibly weak criticism of Hello (nee Orkut). In time that could change, and this critique would suggest that somehow makes Hello worth considering.

      A more thoroughgoing critique is that Hello just another central-point-of-censorship/tracker regardless of what their current terms of service and/or developer promises say. Switching from Facebook to this or some workalike is switching masters or switching parties who spy on you, not gett

  • by cascadingstylesheet ( 140919 ) on Saturday April 14, 2018 @11:02PM (#56439413)

    Available only as a smartphone app.

    There's likely a reason for that; to get permissions it would not get on a PC. No thanks.

    • There's likely a reason for that; to get permissions it would not get on a PC.

      Are you using Lynx? On a modern browser you can consider yourself lucky that this post doesn't turn on your webcam and start recording your Slashdot session.

  • If you're looking for a new social network that really does respect your privacy, try http://www.foxsake.com/ [foxsake.com] .

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I can't find it on hello.com, but Google can:

    https://hello.com/policy/privacy/

    (excerpt)

    Information that We Share with Third Parties
    We will not share any PII that we have collected from or regarding you except as described below:

    Information Shared with Other Account Holders. As part of our Services, any Account holder may view your profile information, which includes your name, gender, location of interest and profile picture. You may also choose to share additional information, such as age or birthday. Your

  • ...and city channel moderator, I'll say this: it won't work. People left Orkut to get on Facebook for a reason. If you never used it, think about MySpace rebranding itself and trying to become relevant once again.

  • People have lost trust in social media, but we're not like the others! I call bullshit on this.
  • Bye

The trouble with the rat-race is that even if you win, you're still a rat. -- Lily Tomlin

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