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Communications The Almighty Buck The Courts United States

A Florida Man Has been Accused of Making 97 Million Robocalls (bloomberg.com) 176

A Florida man accused of flooding consumers with 97 million phone calls touting fake travel deals appeared Wednesday before lawmakers to explain how robocalls work and to say, "I am not the kingpin of robocalling that is alleged." From a report: Adrian Abramovich, of Miami, who is fighting a proposed $120 million fine, told senators that open-source software lets operators make thousands of phone calls with the click of a button, in combination with cloud-based computing and "the right long distance company." "Clearly regulation needs to address the carriers and providers and require the major carriers to detect robocalls activity," Abramovich said in testimony submitted in advance to the Senate Commerce Committee. He has asked the Federal Communications Commission to reduce the fine proposed last year, calling it disproportionate, in part because most calls went unanswered or resulted in a quick hang-up by consumers. The panel's chairman, Senator John Thune, a South Dakota Republican, called Abamovich and officials from the FCC and other agencies to discuss ways to stop abusive calls.
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A Florida Man Has been Accused of Making 97 Million Robocalls

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @03:25PM (#56459823)

    People like Adrian Abramovich have ruined the phone system. Their abuse has led to people no longer answering their phone from anyone who is not in their
    contacts already and maybe not even then. While you can use blacklisting software, this is troublesome for people who need to receive calls from any
    number. I've talked with a number of people who say they just don't answer the phone anymore.

    Fuck these pieces of shit and throw them in jail where they belong.

    • by Locke2005 ( 849178 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @03:54PM (#56459999)
      First fix the flaw in the system that allows any scammer to spoof any number they want, which is the only explanation for why I keep getting robocalls from numbers that match the first 6 digits of my own number. I've got news for you buddy: having the same starting digits as the area I first got my cell phone in 20 years ago doesn't make you one of my neighbors now!
      • by JcMorin ( 930466 )
        this! I don't see why the system allowed someone to call me without first revealing their identity first!
        • this! I don't see why the system allowed someone to call me without first revealing their identity first!

          Because the carriers have no incentive to fix the system, and politicians have no reason to change the regulations because voters don't seem to care.

          I would be more willing to vote for someone who promised to require the telecoms to fix spoofing and robocalls. But there clearly are not many people who feel the same, or it would be a winning political issue.

      • by timholman ( 71886 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @06:22PM (#56460903)

        First fix the flaw in the system that allows any scammer to spoof any number they want, which is the only explanation for why I keep getting robocalls from numbers that match the first 6 digits of my own number.

        It's not a flaw, it's a feature. It permits employees of legitimate businesses to show a different callback number (e.g. customer service) rather than their personal extensions.

        But robocalling can still be fixed from the user end. I've got an Obihai Obi110 on my home phone configured as a call screener. When someone calls, it answers in two rings and says, "You've reached xxx-xxxx. Please press 1 to continue." When a live caller hears that, pressing "1" then causes my phone to ring.

        But robocallers are stopped cold. The autodialer pushes the call to the next operator in the call center, but that process takes several seconds. By the time the guy in the call center connects to the call, all he hears is silence, at least until the "disconnected number" tone is played by the Obi110 after another 20 seconds. My phone never rings.

        In nearly three years, not one robocall has made it past the Obi110. Call logs show that scam call attempts have dropped from 5 to about 1 per day over the past three years, so my home number is clearly falling off the phone lists of the big call centers.

        The pickup-to-handoff delay is built into the robocall system. Scammers can't afford to have a live person listen to every call. Give consumers the ability to implement a similar system for home and cell phones, with a challenge / response that can be modified, and you'll cripple the robocall industry.

        • The issue with this is that there are a few legitimate robocaller uses. My credit card company uses robocalling to contact me when there is potential fraud charges on my account. I realize this might be a rare case, but I really want that particular robocall to go through.

          I'm not a phone line expert, but it seems like phone companies should require companies register numbers that they want to spoof and provide proof that they actually own that number. Any spoofed calls not validated should be killed.

          Anot

        • This system is great if your house is wired the right way. You need to have one wire into the house that the Obi plugs into and then all your other phones plug into the Obi.

          My house ain't wired that way. One wire sneaks out to the demarc and then it's all parallel wiring inside the walls to all the other phone outlets. I would have to run another wire out to the demarc to put the Obi in series with the incoming line, and then connect to the rest of the inside wiring. Not impossible, but not something I'd

          • This system is great if your house is wired the right way. You need to have one wire into the house that the Obi plugs into and then all your other phones plug into the Obi.

            Most houses are wired the way yours are. That's why I bought a wireless phone system with a base station and multiple handsets. The Obi110 plugs into the base station (which includes an answering machine). None of my handsets ring unless a human calls me. I do have a couple of plug-in phones on a couple of extensions, but the ringers

        • by dgatwood ( 11270 )

          It's not a flaw, it's a feature. It permits employees of legitimate businesses to show a different callback number (e.g. customer service) rather than their personal extensions.

          That doesn't require the ability to substitute arbitrary numbers — only numbers in a block of numbers owned/rented by the company in question. The flaw is that there is no sanity checking or filtering at the telecom level to determine whether the caller ID data is plausible. If the telephone company detected bogus caller ID m

          • That doesn't require the ability to substitute arbitrary numbers â" only numbers in a block of numbers owned/rented by the company in question. The flaw is that there is no sanity checking or filtering at the telecom level to determine whether the caller ID data is plausible. If the telephone company detected bogus caller ID messages and immediately terminated the call, we wouldn't have this problem.

            Agreed, the telcos could most certainly fix Caller ID, or at the very least dramatically reduce the abil

        • > It's not a flaw, it's a feature. It permits employees of
          > legitimate businesses to show a different callback
          > number (e.g. customer service) rather than their
          > personal extensions.

          Well, I'd say that's a "feature" that's outlived its usefulness.

          I get multiple number-spoofed scam calls every DAY at this point. Sure, every new number goes into my block list. But that doesn't stop the scammers setting their robocaller to just use the next number in the exchange. Meanwhile, I'm pretty sure I've

        • In Belgium it is illegal to change the number to anything else but what you own. So if you have a range of 100 numbers, you can onlty select one of those.
          When you use an external call venter, you can saynot to show their number (and pay ffor that) or use their number. So here the law is already in place.

        • There's two solutions there:

          1. Have a short intro message: "thegarbz here!" and if you hear silence for more than 2 seconds just hang up.
          2. If you hear an indian accent just hang up. .... This actually got me in trouble with one of my indian friends.

        • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

          Can't you just making it illegal to robocall people? Seems to have worked well enough in other countries. Robocalls aren't even a thing in the UK.

          • It is illegal. FCC doesn't do shit to enforce it, and the phone companies don't give a fuck. Hence the current situation.

        • by mjwx ( 966435 )

          First fix the flaw in the system that allows any scammer to spoof any number they want, which is the only explanation for why I keep getting robocalls from numbers that match the first 6 digits of my own number.

          It's not a flaw, it's a feature. It permits employees of legitimate businesses to show a different callback number (e.g. customer service) rather than their personal extensions.

          No, thats a flaw. Number masking should be handled by the PABX system, the telco is not even involved in masking private extensions.

          The "feature" is that the scammer pays the phone company money to do this. This is why it was banned by lawmakers in other countries.

          • No, thats a flaw.

            It was originally meant to be a feature, else why would the telcos allow spoofing? Problem was, it has long outlived its usefulness, and the feature has become a bug.

            One of the original arguments for Caller ID spoofing (besides business case uses) was to allow abused women staying at women's shelters to "hide" their location, so that husbands and boyfriends couldn't track them down from the Caller ID number. You could block your own Caller ID number when calling out, but many people paid

        • But robocalling can still be fixed from the user end. I've got an Obihai Obi110 on my home phone configured as a call screener

          That works for land phones but not cell phones. Robocallers are spoofing the exchange numbers for cell phones now and there's no adapter solution to combat this.

          The only solution is to fix the callerID system so spoofing is no longer possible, and Adrian is conveniently neglecting to mention this.

      • by dgatwood ( 11270 )

        First fix the flaw in the system that allows any scammer to spoof any number they want, which is the only explanation for why I keep getting robocalls from numbers that match the first 6 digits of my own number.

        Oh, I actually kind of like that. Now I know which calls are the really abusive ones. Our area has an overlay of so many different prefixes that I don't know a single person who has both my area code and exact prefix. Even my next-door neighbors all have different prefixes. Most of them use cell

      • They're not mutually exclusive. Do both. Just because the system allows it doesn't make it ok. Throw the fuck face in jail, AND mandate the providers fix their systems.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      He spoofs phone numbers to make them look like local numbers (same area code + prefix) to push his robocall scams. Robocalls, number spoofing and scams are all illegal. I receive a minimum of three spam calls per day on my home phone and I've even gotten a few on my mobile phone.

      I would beat that guy to death with my bare hands if I got a hold of him.

    • I'm not willing to sign off on any punishment that doesn't involve the phrase "next of kin".
    • This. It got to the point where my girlfriend didn't answer the phone from unlisted contacts. So ... she got another phone with a new number when she was working as a substitute teacher with a rule that she will answer that phone and simply hang up if it's not from a school since no one else should have that number.

      Well I was stuck in the bush one day without a phone signal and a used ... a pay phone. I know I was amazed they still exist too. After calling her main phone 4 times and not getting an answer I

    • Sentence him to 97-million consecutive jail terms of one minute each, to make up for the people's time he has wasted.
  • Fine seems fair (Score:4, Informative)

    by TimMD909 ( 260285 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @03:29PM (#56459841) Homepage
    $1.24 per nuisance call seems pretty fair. Hell, even $5 per unwanted call seems reasonable and would quickly end robocalling.
    • by zifn4b ( 1040588 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @03:32PM (#56459863)

      $1.24 per nuisance call seems pretty fair. Hell, even $5 per unwanted call seems reasonable and would quickly end robocalling.

      In addition, he should be forced to listen to random scam call scripts using text-to-speech for the rest of his life via a cochlear implant.

      • Just got one as I was reading this "Hello, this is an alert from Visa/Mastercard services"- actually one of the more legitimate scams out there, but I don't have a credit card with the big banks and anything real, my credit union would call me direct without bothering with them.

      • $1.24 per nuisance call seems pretty fair. Hell, even $5 per unwanted call seems reasonable and would quickly end robocalling.

        In addition, he should be forced to listen to random scam call scripts using text-to-speech for the rest of his life via a cochlear implant.

        Robocall for robocall will leave everyone deaf - Gandhi

      • I agree. He should be forced to have a conversation with Lenny for an hour every day for 20 years.

      • I was thinking that he should have a special collar attached to him that would emit a low voltage (but still painful) shock every time people called a number. "Annoyed by telemarketers and robocalls? Dial 1-800-SHOCKING to shock someone who placed millions of robocalls." Sure, the hold times might get long, but the knowledge that we were returning some discomfort back to him would be worth it.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Only if the phone companies involved are also fined for befitting from the proceeds of crime. ANY one making that many calls and in quick succession should stand out. Hell we'd get calls from Bell Security for wardialing (1-2 numbers per _minute_).

      Capatcha: foursome Slashdot you kinky little slut.

    • He should also be required to call... by hand, on an old-school rotary-dial phone... every single person he robocalled, personally apologize, accept any verbal abuse received, and express his total agreement with said abuse, before moving on to the next offended party. And just to add in a bit of extra poetic justice; he should be required to issue these apologies to those people in alphabetical order.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @03:31PM (#56459853)

    Florida Man strikes again!

    • by skids ( 119237 )

      Worst. Superhero. Ever.

      • by lgw ( 121541 )

        Florida Man, Florida Man
        Florida Man meets Particle Man
        They have a fight, Particle wins
        Repugnant man, Florida Man

        Now you got that in stuck your head

  • This is not a FL man headline
    This is a Florida Man headline

    Florida Man gets drunk, falls off bicycle, hits man at hospital with folding chair, police say
  • Fry the shit bag (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Chewbacon ( 797801 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @03:35PM (#56459877)

    Zero sympathy. Takes a lot of work to set up such an operation to scam grannies out of their credit cards.

  • Would it be any better if a closed source software did the same thing? Is it something like Thomas Alva Edison persuading New York to choose an AC current to make the electric chair to make people fear his rival's inventions?
    • Would it be any better if a closed source software did the same thing?

      Yes, for the same reason that I like it when [Large Tech Company] patents [Evil Thing]. Sure, evil thing is evil, but now only that one company can do it (for 20 years). Closed source software would raise the burden to spam calls, making it happen less frequently.

    • I think the fact that the software was free, and was able to do this with a low expense to himself. Could possibly saw peoples opinions.
      If they were a big company who but millions of dollars into this, they may get less sympathy then some redneck who is following the get rich quick scheme of the week.
      That would be for some people. Me having worked for small businesses want to point out lowlifes like this give small companies a bad name, and reasons for people to shop at the big name store. Sure they will

  • That which is jailed shall never be permitted to access phone systems

    • by Z00L00K ( 682162 )

      Solitary confinement for life?

      • Unacceptable. Solitary confinement shall not be used except in extreme cases, due to specific need, with the signature of the Prison Director, and never for a period longer than 15 days, for up to 22 hours per day, with council from a physician and psychiatrist that confinement will not exacerbate any physical or psychological illness, and a physician and psychiatrist visit each day. Should medical council instruct the removal of the prisoner from solitary confinement, it shall be carried out immediately

        • by Z00L00K ( 682162 )

          That depends on which country that carries out the sentence.

          Or in a prison filled with batshit crazy gangs and you can't be a member of any of them.

          • by bluefoxlucid ( 723572 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @04:39PM (#56460293) Homepage Journal

            There shouldn't be prison gangs. Prison should reflect society--the community we want to create--so that people come out of prison ready to thrive in society, to go on to be productive individuals. Prisons that create insecurity and fail to treat people with basic human dignity fill with gangs and violence, and emit violent and damaged criminals to terrorize our communities.

            By creating an environment in which the prisoners are secure, treated humanely, and given attention to their individual needs, we develop a better community within the prison, and release into society those well-adapted individuals who are brought up and made whole by the support of such a community.

            Prisons such as we see in many areas of the United States are cruel and unusual punishment.

            • Prisons that create insecurity and fail to treat people with basic human dignity fill with gangs and violence,

              Gang members are gang members before they go in. Putting gang members in jail is what fills jails with gangs, not how well or poorly you treat the gang members while they are there.

              Also, gang activities have little to do with how well people are treated, they are an attempt to gain power over others. Put 10 bloods into a jail housing unit and they will act in concert to have power over the other inmates, no matter how well they are treated. They won't stop being bloods just because they get extra servings

              • Putting gang members in jail is what fills jails with gangs, not how well or poorly you treat the gang members while they are there.

                Empirical evidence has shown this is false, although you can continue to claim that consuming alcohol in high quantities over sufficiently short time spans doesn't cause drunkenness if you like.

                • Empirical evidence has shown this is false,

                  Uhhh, so you put a blood in jail and he stops being a blood? What?

                  Yes, I will agree there is some potential for gang recruitment of previously unaffiliated people, but that's still not because of mistreatment -- except for mistreatment of unaffiliated inmates by the existing gangs. People join gangs for power over others. Strength in Numbers. Not because jailhouse food sucks.

                  although you can continue to claim that consuming alcohol in high quantities over sufficiently short time spans doesn't cause drunkenness if you like.

                  I have no idea where you got this from, so I know you are not understanding what I actually did write.

                  • Uhhh, so you put a blood in jail and he stops being a blood?

                    No. It's been shown that taking nearly anyone--gang criminals, rapists, drug dealers, the lot--and putting them into a humane environment which focuses on their individual needs to maintain their sense of security and their human dignity quickly and effectively rehabilitates them. Yes, even hardened gang criminals.

                    By contrast, prison gangs actually rally around neglect and inhumane treatment. They use it to form a bond among their kin, reassuring themselves that The Man doesn't care about them, and th

              • by pnutjam ( 523990 )
                It says alot about you when you immedietly go to Bloods and Crips as your gang example, vs MS-13, Outlaws, or the Aryan Brotherhood.
                Gangs exist in prison because the guards like it that way. They let them run things because it's convenient.
                We can and should do better.
        • Just put a phone in his cell and give out the number. Problem solved.

      • by PPH ( 736903 )

        Solitary confinement for life?

        No. He shares a cell with Cletus.

  • by QuietLagoon ( 813062 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @03:45PM (#56459931)
    ... ."the right long distance company."...
    • Seriously, that is the key to this. Find that telco and make them pay $120 million too. Problem solved.
      • by Khyber ( 864651 )

        I can tell you with 99.9999% certainty that Level 3 is responsible for this. Every single robocall I've ever received has been from their networks and numbers they control (when the idiot scammers don't bother hiding their CID.)

        • by sl3xd ( 111641 )

          How does one tell it's a number/network that Level 3 controls?

          • by Khyber ( 864651 )

            A lot of times the idiot scammer doesn't hide their Caller ID, which makes it very easy to trace to a call center whose VoIP is provided by Level3 or one of their direct subsidiaries.

    • ... ."the right long distance company."...

      or more specifically the right SIP trunk provider. I worked for a company that made lots of automated calls (legally, within the bounds of market research). We had plenty of providers who would just say no, but there were enough that didn't even bother to ask. They all made sure we sent an ANI, although they didn't seem to care what that ANI was, or if we even owned it, (which we did), and they made sure our call duration on connected calls wasn't below 12 seconds (I don't recall what the short duration r

  • by Anonymous Coward

    ...Because the victims didn't answer their phones? Isn't that what Caller ID is for? Once the phone rings, the crime has been committed. Just because the victim isn't stupid enough to answer, that doesn't mitigate the accused party's guilt.

  • That sounds fair to me!
    • Allow those that received the calls to kick him square in the nuts. Once for each call.

      Put him in stocks, that travel the nation, so people can kick him in the nuts without travelling. Just a trip to the local park to catch his 'tour'.

      Allow any gay male victims to 'go in dry' if they so choose. Only rule, no lube allowed.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Why are they still allowed to change their caller id. It should not be possible at all. I get calls all the time from the same area code and exchange as my cell. They are fraudulent. It got so bad I banned all calls like that. Eventually I am just going to shut the ringer off for good and only use it for outgoing calls. Not worth my time anymore.

  • How about this: Force him to answer the same number of robo calls he's made. Then he can know how fun it is to be interrupted during dinner, working, etc. and I'm sure it's not that big of a deal since he will hang up real quick.

  • by ToTheStars ( 4807725 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @04:11PM (#56460111)
    "'My name is Adrian; I inherited the phone from the previous Dread Pirate Robocaller, just as you will inherit it from me. The man I inherited it from is not the real Dread Pirate Robocaller either. His name was Tommy Tutone. The real Robocaller has been retired 15 years and living like a king in South Carolina.' Then he explained the name is the important thing to inspire the necessary impulse. You see, no one would ever buy a travel deal from the Dread Pirate Adrian."
  • by spywhere ( 824072 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @04:15PM (#56460131)
    I've heard from this scumbag twice today, a dozen times so far this week. Fines and prison are too good for him. He should be keelhauled.
  • by devjoe ( 88696 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @04:15PM (#56460133)
    There are one or two scammers calling just about every American phone number more-or-less weekly, way more than the 97 million calls this guy is alleged to have made. They always spoof the source number into something the same as yours except for the last 4 digits, which are selected randomly, in an attempt to make the call appear to come from one of your neighbors, in the misguided belief that people still use phone numbers which were assigned to landlines sequentially throughout neighborhoods decades ago. It probably works for them because Granny who's had the same phone number for 40 years is the kind of person they are trying to prey upon. [This also has the side-effect of making it difficult to blacklist all the calling numbers, which drives the hatred seen elsewhere in the thread.]

    When I ignore the call on my cell phone, the robocaller, who doesn't understand answering machines or voicemail, just starts talking anyway as soon as it hears voice and then the voice stops, and leaves a long rambling message (the first few words of which is cut off) about one of two scams: Either "you qualified for a free trip based on your previous stay at one of our resorts" or "there is a problem with your account", both of them being very vague (the resorts or account in question are never specified) and trying to social-engineer actual information out of the victim.

    Of course, those of you with phones have probably already heard these calls enough times to learn to ignore them immediately.
  • That fact that a button is easily pushed does not in any way exonerate the button pushers. The President has a button, and, "gosh, who knew it would screw things up" for people won't fly if it were ever to be pushed. Neither would "gosh, I didn't build the nukes" won't either. Even if they're open source at the time.
  • Solution for Nerds (Score:4, Informative)

    by SinGunner ( 911891 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @04:47PM (#56460339)
    Just don't say anything when you answer a call from an unknown number. A real person will always ask "Hello" in a questioning voice. Robocalls don't know how to deal with silence and hang up. And even if they learn to interpret long silence, they'll never navigate the awkward handshake that happens when the person answering the call doesn't get in the first "Hello".
    • That is reasonable and probably quite effective, but I have a more fun solution. I instead answer the phone in Classical Latin - "Salue, hic [nomen] est, quomodo audiuem?". If they respond as though nothing weird just happened, they're either a robot or a person who's indistinguishable from one, and I hang up, often after threatening some manner of debauchery with them, their parents, their progeny, their pets, or all of the above. (Latin is *great* for that sort of thing.)

      If they get confused, or try greet

      • It would be interesting to know if your method is as effective using Klingon or Esperanto.

        • Clearly not having learned my lesson with Latin, I *have* been attempting to teach myself Esperanto. I might try that when I feel like I could actually carry on a conversation, in the one-in-a-million chance that the person calling actually speaks Esperanto. I will report back when I finally give it a try.

    • Just don't say anything when you answer a call from an unknown number.

      In other words, let the scammers win because you've wasted your time answering their call in the first place.

      The solution is to put an answering machine on the line. If there is no message, the call wasn't important enough to worry about anyway. If you are home and hear someone leaving a message, answer the phone and tell them you picked up just because it was them. That will make them feel special.

      For the few stupid scammers that leave messages, yes, your time listening to the message is wasted. Better

    • And whatever you do, don't say "Yes." If you do, your recording of "Yes" can be attached to a recording of "Do you agree to X" and used as verification that you agreed to some garbage service. If you have to answer in the affirmative (for example, there's still a chance that this isn't a scam call and you want to stay on the line), find other words that can't be used to mean "I agree to whatever you're really selling."

  • He has asked the Federal Communications Commission to reduce the fine proposed last year, calling it disproportionate, in part because most calls went unanswered or resulted in a quick hang-up by consumers.

    He wants a reduction because he couldn't annoy people long enough?

    Seriously!?

    They should double his fine just for asking that.

  • his phone numbers should remain public for every one to call him with congratulations on winning a vaction or whatever crap he sells.
  • by epine ( 68316 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @05:37PM (#56460645)

    I'm imaging a Life of Brain-like movie, where someone impassioned stands up, and delivers with deep, sonorous eloquence the famous line from Jesus: "let he who is without sin cast the first stone".

    And everybody in the crowd seems to take a deep breath, and the underfed scoundrel at the center of things is about to kiss the dirt beneath his scabby feet, but then somewhere in the crowd a phone rings, and then an agitated Hebrew voice mutters "fucking robocall" with dark resignation—and immediately the execution is on again, with twice as many stones in hand as the first time.

    Psssst, Jesus, word to the wise: don't deliver that epic line while someone in the crowd is receiving a robocall, it just won't stick.

  • This guy is trying to spin himself as a "not-so-bad-guy" because it's so easy to get software to do what he does and the carriers don't prevent him?

    "Clearly regulation needs to address the carriers and providers and require the major carriers to detect robocalls activity,"

    I.e. if it's illegal to spoof and robocall then robocall and spoofing tools need to be impossible to get, illegal to use or taken away, and the media companies should prevent these tools from being usable! I can't be held responsible!

    Let's apply this reasoning to Nicholas Cruz: Hey! If it's illegal to kill people with guns, then guns should be impossible to

    • Let's apply this reasoning to Nicholas Cruz: Hey! If it's illegal to kill people with guns, then guns should be impossible to get, illegal to use or taken away, and everyone should prevent guns from being usable!

      You've just described the anti-gun zealot's argument in one sentence.

  • Holy crap that was a lot of robocalls. Why would someone do such a tedious thing? He should have gotten a robot to do it for him.

    ...

    Thanks, I'll be here all wee- oh shit, they cancelled me. Fuck this crowd, good night.

  • Obligatory (Score:4, Insightful)

    by DontBeAMoran ( 4843879 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @06:04PM (#56460791)

    Hello. This is Homer Simpson, a.k.a. Happy Dude. The court has ordered me to call every person in town to apologize for my telemarketing scam. I'm sorry. If you can find it in your heart to forgive me, send one dollar to Sorry Dude 742 Evergreen Terrace, Springfield. You have the power.

  • The fine imposed for his activity is disproportionate to his crime. I just suspect that he'd be begging to have the fine back if anyone proposed something actually proportionate.
  • by markdavis ( 642305 ) on Wednesday April 18, 2018 @06:53PM (#56461095)

    >"to reduce the fine proposed last year, calling it disproportionate, in part because most calls went unanswered or resulted in a quick hang-up by consumers"

    Really? So, the fact that we didn't answer or did and hung up quickly somehow means we weren't annoyed, or weren't disturbed, or didn't have our privacy invaded?

    We need CRIMINAL laws against *all* robocalling (and most other unsolicited spam calls) and an easy way to report them (like dialing a number after a call) AND enforcement. None of the existing "regulations" and "fines" seem to make any difference at all in the problem.

  • I wished I had a 200db Air Horn handy for those times I'd bother to try to get a live body on the phone when this schmuck calls - one of those "My job sucks and this guy tried to deafen me - might want to consider a new job"

  • I think I speak for everyone when I say he needs to be executed for wasting billions of hours of Americans' time. Crime on that level is unforgivable.

I've got a bad feeling about this.

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