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Operating Systems AI Ubuntu Linux

Ubuntu 18.04 Focuses On Security and AI Improvements (sdtimes.com) 89

Canonical has announced the release of its open-source Linux operating system, Ubuntu 18.04, which features security, multi-cloud, containers, and AI improvements. From a report: "Multi-cloud operations are the new normal," said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical and founder of Ubuntu, in a statement. "Boot-time and performance-optimized images of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on every major public cloud make it the fastest and most efficient OS for cloud computing, especially for storage and compute intensive tasks like machine learning." On-premises and on-cloud AI development within Ubuntu will be improved by the integration of Kubeflow and a range of CI/CD tools into Canonical Kubernetes. Kubeflow is a machine learning library built on Kubernetes.
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Ubuntu 18.04 Focuses On Security and AI Improvements

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    "Multi-cloud operations are the new normal"... What? I have literally no *clue* what this could possibly even mean. Are we still talking about computers? On Earth? Humans? Or is this some sort of alien technology from a different world? Multi-cloud operations? Operations? Cloud? Multi-cloud? Fuck off.

    • I thought there was only one cloud, "the cloud", and everything went there.

      • only one cloud, "the cloud", and everything went there.

        Mostly never to be seen again. Alternatively to be accidentally released to one-and-all.

      • "Multi-cloud operations are the new normal"... What? I have literally no *clue* what this could possibly even mean. Are we still talking about computers? On Earth? Humans? Or is this some sort of alien technology from a different world? Multi-cloud operations? Operations? Cloud? Multi-cloud?

        I thought there was only one cloud, "the cloud", and everything went there.

        Obviously, Canonical has cracked multi-dimensional travel with Ubuntu 18.04 and it can connect with The Cloud in all the other dimensions / Universes. I'm so looking forward to messing with the Google and Amazon search histories of my other-dimension counterparts.

    • And what I believe it to mean is that many people nowadays are frequently using several different cloud services, sometimes at the same time. Which I believe is true, too. (Yes, 'cloud' is just a hip name for something that was not really new when the term was coined, but I guess we simply have to go along with it now.)

      That said, I've organized my personal cloud usage via my own server running Nextcloud, which performs the task of synchronizing with all the other cloud storage services I still sometimes use

      • Question about NextCloud: What do you think of it?

        I use OwnCloud. This was just before NextCloud became practical. I considered going to NextCloud when an OwnCloud client for my aging iPad2 "upgraded" and stopped working. Ultimately I stayed with OwnCloud just to minimize complexity.

        How is NextCloud in terms of maturity? Is it a drop-in replacement for OwnCloud, or does it have issues? Do you find yourself using features not available in OwnCloud? (Not that I know what those are, but the marketing tex

        • Sorry for replying this late. Just in case you find back here, too:

          My impression is (not from own experience, though, but from what I read) that Nextcloud has become quite mature these days. As I haven't made the comparison myself, I cannot really say whether I'm actually using anything that's not available (or not available freely) in ownCloud. One significant difference is that all Nextcloud components are freely available under GNU AGPLv3. Here [civihosting.com]'s a rather detailed comparison from last year.

          Nextcloud cann

    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 26, 2018 @01:28PM (#56507859)

      "Multi-cloud operations are the new normal"... What?

      I can explain.

      He means that to best leverage new trends in AI and blockchain technologies, customers no longer want to be constrained to just one cloud in today's increasingly global competitive landscape. This is cloud computing brought into the modern era, with full-on support for more rapid paradigm shifts and enhanced disruptive innovation. This new release will allow alignment of enterprise level strategies with synergistic goals to increase customer mind share and build viral growth.

      It is only by using this multi cloud technology that modern consumer facing agile entities can grow their business and re-imagine a future in which outside the box thinking becomes the new normal. Ubuntu 18.04 supports all these emerging technological trends, and more.

      This is basic, mission critical process, and I am astonished that anyone on a supposed "tech site" like this would be unaware. Shame on you for not keeping up with broad trends in innovation and holistic consumer enablement.

    • by skoskav ( 1551805 ) on Thursday April 26, 2018 @01:47PM (#56508023)

      I suspect he's talking about having multiple Kubernetes clusters available on the CLI, e.g. one local minikube cluster (virtualized through e.g. a headless Virtualbox or KVM), plus multiple cloud clusters (e.g. one for integration-testing, and one for production) via Microsoft Azure or Amazon AWS.

      But Canonical's marketing is garbage. They should perhaps split the press releases for their Desktop, Server and Cloud editions.

      • I suspect he's talking about having multiple Kubernetes clusters available on the CLI, e.g. one local minikube cluster (virtualized through e.g. a headless Virtualbox or KVM), plus multiple cloud clusters (e.g. one for integration-testing, and one for production) via Microsoft Azure or Amazon AWS.

        Just an FYI, the A in AWS stands for Amazon.

  • and use that brand new release, then let me know when most of the early bugs are fixed.
    • I was thinking the same thing....how long before I should install this? Couple of weeks? Couple of months?

      • You can use it now. Honestly. I've been using the pre-release for over a month and have yet to come across a single real problem with it. Most reliable Ubuntu release I've tried in a long time. Just a shame the UI continues to go in the wrong direction (but I'm using Cinnamon anyway...)
        • Thanks for the info! I'll do a quick backup and likely take the plunge this weekend. This is the sort of feedback I really needed. Been burned too many times, but if there is a single, "not terrible", that goes a long way in my book.

          Cheers!

    • by qubezz ( 520511 )

      I already upgraded Kubuntu, the upgrade channel was already open. Very little changes on that front from 17.10. The "system settings" is surprising unified now even with KDE. For users of lesser desktop environments, 18.10 is back to X11 instead of Wayland and Unity is ditched for more standard Gnome.

      sudo do-release-upgrade -d

      Be sure to go into system settings and turn off the new telemetry. Although it is supposed to be opt-in for upgraders, my upgrade had at least crash reporting turned on.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I use Ubuntu 16 mainly as a host machine for Virtualbox guest VMs

    My wishlist for fixes is:

    The screen-lock doesn't work correctly with Virtualbox -- I'll leave the PC for awhile, come back, move the mouse, then will have access to a guest VM for a little while until the host (Ubuntu) finally realizes that it probably should ask for a password

    I had to force shutdown Ubuntu last night -- UI shutdown failed, logged in as root and did a halt command (also didn't work) -- held the power button for force a shutdow

    • I don't mean to sound snarky, but have you reported these issues on their bug tracker?
    • The screen lock problem is a problem with X11 and is one of the things that Wayland is supposed to be able to completely fix.

      Fixing the Alt key thing (e.g disabling the HUD completely) is to open ccsm (Compiz Config Settings Manager), click on "Desktop", then click on "Ubuntu Unity Plugin" and there you have a "Key to shot the HUD when tapped" and instead of changing it to a different key you can outright disable it there.

  • by tverbeek ( 457094 ) on Thursday April 26, 2018 @01:58PM (#56508117) Homepage

    They've announced the release, and released the announcement, but the software is not yet available for download....

  • by freak0fnature ( 1838248 ) on Thursday April 26, 2018 @02:22PM (#56508319)
  • I heard a lot of good things about Ubuntu Bare Beaver so I figured I would try it. But it's locked down tight. No matter what I tried, I couldn't root beaver. And even command line tools -- old standbys like finger, touch, unzip, mount, and shave -- gave me a permission denied error. What good is a beaver if you can't use it?

    Maybe next release, Choad Cock, will be more to my liking.

  • by Anonymous Coward
    Now if only they could focus on cleaning up that mess of a user interface. As much as I hated Unity at first, I really appreciate the fact that they took care in compacting menu items into the global app menu while keeping the systray icons and time tucked over to the right. This allowed them to remove an entire top window bar and clean things up for people with limited vertical space(eg. laptops). Gnome feels like a complete step backwards in functionality by comparison.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Ubuntu has lost its way. Pretending I am barely computer literate, I couldn't get the latest Ubuntu distro to work in a Windows network at home. All the machines are Windows 7, 10 and on the default workgroup named, "workgroup". You still have to install the Samba binaries then modify a text file. For a windows user, this can at least be done by clicking your way through it, but in Ubuntu you have to do "sudo gedit config" or some other commandline. Bottom line is that it's a total pain in the ass for

  • ...will blockchain the synergies out of AI cloud computing.

  • I really think this is a strong release. The notable uplift of packages to directly tackle things like the spectre and meltdown defects.

    However
    Ever since systemd-resolved was added to systemd in ubuntu 16.10 the resolver has been broken. Especially in local networks with dhcp and local dns.

    It's basically un-usable as it stands. But a recent change in systemd-resolved makes it fairly trivial to get resolution working again.

    With version 237 of systemd a stub-resolv.conf file was added. This is what the lo

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