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Chrome Google Security Software

Google Disables Inline Installation For Chrome Extensions (venturebeat.com) 100

An anonymous reader writes: Google today announced that Chrome will no longer support inline installation of extensions. New extensions lose inline installation starting today, existing extensions will lose the ability in three months, and in early December the inline install API will be removed from the browser with the release of Chrome 71. Critics have pointed out such moves make the Chrome Web Store a walled garden, while Google insists pushing users to the store ultimately protects them.

Google Disables Inline Installation For Chrome Extensions

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    Apple did it first post.

  • This is fine (Score:5, Insightful)

    by omnichad ( 1198475 ) on Tuesday June 12, 2018 @02:50PM (#56773056) Homepage

    If you've ever seen a regular Chrome user's computer, you know there's at least one rogue extension that they can't explain how it was installed. More likely, several - and one of them changing the new tab page or redirecting searches away from Google.

  • Right up to the moment you realize that as much as 30% of the apps there are not properly vetted, and that infections are RAMPANT! But, of course, going to a developer who doesn't want to pay google or conform to their BS, that you may have been downloading apps and content from for DECADES, is worse somehow because google can't extort them or force creative control over their code/IP.... Isn't it?
    • Right up to the moment you realize that as much as 30% of the apps there are not properly vetted

      And 70% of the apps have been vetted. Sounds safer to me.

    • More like 0% of apps are properly vetted.

      If you happen to get an app or extension that isn't malware, it's more likely just luck and coincidence, not an actual benefit of getting something from an official App Store.

      After all, Google and Apple have so few employees and so little money, they can't possibly conduct proper vetting of apps.

      • More like 0% of apps are properly vetted.

        If you happen to get an app or extension that isn't malware, it's more likely just luck and coincidence, not an actual benefit of getting something from an official App Store.

        After all, Google and Apple have so few employees and so little money, they can't possibly conduct proper vetting of apps.

        What is the point of getting a malware-free extension for Chrome? Chrome already is malware, it is made specifically as spyware to collect more data on you, and while it benign in that it can be (mostly) disabled, and Google is probably one of the safest places to have your personal data, and trusted to only to sell it anonymized as statistics, it still is what it is.

  • As long as they support Radial, Boxer, and V8 and Wankel Rotary installations, we're good to go.
  • Good, another reason (Score:1, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    To push Chrome onto the vast majority of people. I can't even count the number of people who I've help with computer issues with odd, usually scammy/spammy/spyware/malware type extensions installed. 100% of the time they had no idea exactly what they were installing, they were essentially "drive by" installs because of this inline installation feature. 100% of the time, I uninstall those extensions and never get one single complaint about "hey this used to work, but now it doesn't"

    The root of the problem

  • by Anonymous Coward

    1. Put up a app walled garden.
    2. Have government demand you remove app that chronicles torture and murder.
    3. Profit

    So long as Google has a walled garden for the expressed purpose of removing nefarious content based upon the whim of governments across the globe, Google is complicit in the support of crimes against humanity.

  • by ugen ( 93902 ) on Tuesday June 12, 2018 @03:15PM (#56773220)

    I wrote a small Chrome extension previously. I did submit it to the Chrome store (where I can download it) - but during the development process I needed to modify and reload that extensions many times over (as is natural to any dev. process)

    Without inline extension installation ability - how would a developer be expected to do that? Is there going to be a special "developer" Chrome version? Or would developer have to submit every line change of the extension to the store in order to test it?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 12, 2018 @03:28PM (#56773322)

      Inline installation just refers to installs from a website. What you are talking about can be done locally using the extensions tab in dev mode.

      • by GoRK ( 10018 )

        Sort of; you can no longer download and install a packaged extension. You have to unpack the extension and put chrome into developer mode where it will display a warning about the extension every time you open Chrome.

        Tried to install moonlight on my macbook yesterday (chrome is the only way to run it on os x) and it was really fucking annoying.

    • Develop your app using Chromium, then port it to Chrome.

    • Welcome to the world of users vs. developers [godsong.org]. I recently installed Android in a VM so I can publish the content I produce on a real OS. I also need to use an "app" (things sure have developed from from the olden decades of "application program") for 2FA, because obviously smartphones and/or Chrome are the best way to keep things secure online.
  • Though it sucks to see another browser making it harder on Devs. I'm still trying to get my extension to play nice with FF Quantum (It's a slow, laborious re-write with a lot more C++ I need to write to do the conversion now). I'm not seeing a lot of improvements in security just more work for devs.
  • by urusan ( 1755332 ) on Tuesday June 12, 2018 @03:32PM (#56773354)

    So that's why Firefox has been becoming more and more Chrome-like, so it can be an alternative to Chrome after this change!

  • I've reported too many dodgy chrome extensions from the chrome store to trust it.
    What this is really about is control over what you can install.

    There are useful extensions for working round restrictions and google is trying to stop you using them.

    Although this is often effective.

    document.body.contentEditable = 'true'; document.designMode='on'; void 0

    just add it as a bookmark usually is fairly successful, just delete the content you don't want.

  • by Tough Love ( 215404 ) on Tuesday June 12, 2018 @03:40PM (#56773428)

    You brought this on yourselves. Who would have thought that a Google-owned browser monoculture would increasingly tend towards evil? Solution: use Chromium. Better solution: use Firefox.

  • But would this mean app developers can't test their extensions without first getting them in the store? If so is Google going to allow bad apps onto the store for the use of testing? Seems very odd.

  • And the definition is? I've been a Chrome user since the beginning and I've never heard that term.
  • Can we get a setting that allows me to use my computer the way I want to? I know how to not wreck myself and would maybe like to not be beholden to Google's strategy tax.

    Oh well, I never got on the Chrome bandwagon, this just ensures I never will.

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