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Submission + - GM Sees a Market for $5/Day Dedicated In-Car Internet: Do You?

An anonymous reader writes: $5 doesn't sound like much for a day of internet service in some contexts: it's less than you might pay for it in-flight, and less than a few espresso drinks if you're lured in by a coffee shop's Wi-Fi service. But not all internet service is created equal; would you pay $5 for a month of in-car internet service if it meant a 200-meg cap, which is (only) "enough to stream more than 6.5 hours of music"? That's where a new dedicated Internet service from GM starts (also at the WSJ, paywalled), and it's $10 for drivers who aren't also OnStar subscribers. Probably a more likely option for the occasional road trip, though, is $5 per day service (no OnStar requirement) for 250MB of data. Why wouldn't someone just use a smartphone with a data plan, or a dedicated hotspot device? GM thinks they'll be drawn to "a powerful antenna that’s stronger than that of a smartphone, along with a Wi-Fi hotspot that operates without draining a mobile device’s battery. That hotspot is on any time the car is on." I might not mind internet connectivity as a feature in a new car, and a powerful antenna sounds good, but I am skeptical that the security and networking standards built into a car will keep pace with separate hardware. And I'm glad they're starting with a Malibu; I hope to see some Repo Man-themed advertising.
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GM Sees a Market for $5/Day Dedicated In-Car Internet: Do You?

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