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Google Businesses The Internet

Gmail Adds POP3 To Email Accounts 527

Posted by timothy
from the rock dept.
VaultX writes "Gmail has recently added POP3 services to their free email accounts. This would allow someone to use gmail without ever seeing any of their advertisements. They are also providing SMTP, both POP3 and SMTP are forcing the use of SSL/TLS. Very interesting...now where's IMAP and what's the catch?" It's being phased in, though, so not every gmail account yet has POP access.
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Gmail Adds POP3 To Email Accounts

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  • The catch is.. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Ckwop (707653) * <Simon.Johnson@gmail.com> on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:42PM (#10780361) Homepage

    ..now where's IMAP and what's the catch

    My guess is that they'll inject adverts in to your e-mail when you download it using pop. The move wouldn't make sense otherwise.

    Simon.

    • Re:The catch is.. (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Vicsun (812730) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:43PM (#10780383)
      The other possibility is that they only keep it free until they iron the bugs out.

      Frankly I like your suggestion better.
      • Re:The catch is.. (Score:5, Interesting)

        by rudy_wayne (414635) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:53PM (#10780524)
        " The other possibility is that they only keep it free until they iron the bugs out."

        A few years ago, I signed up with a company that advertised "free e-mail for life" and it included POP3 access. After a short time, only web-based access was free and POP3 required you to pay. I think that's exactly where Google is headed.
      • Re:The catch is.. (Score:5, Insightful)

        by sik0fewl (561285) <xxdigitalhellxx@nOsPAM.hotmail.com> on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:54PM (#10780531) Homepage

        I like his suggestion better, too. However, everybody seems to forget the Gmail is still in BETA. This is BETA software and they are testing BETA features. These features don't have to be available when Gmail comes out of BETA and they most certainly don't have to be free.

        Noticed how I emphasized the BETA and the BETA, for what I hope are obvious reasons.

      • Re:The catch is.. (Score:5, Interesting)

        by mesach (191869) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:32PM (#10781007)
        Am I the only jaded enough by the barrage of ads to not even notice them any more.

        Seriously, I completely forgot that Gmail had ads, until someone i was showing it to pointed out that you have to look at the ads all the time.

        I guess years of manually sifting usenet as fast as my mouse wheel can scroll has made my eyes impervious to spam and ads.
    • Re:The catch is.. (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Tim C (15259) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:47PM (#10780448)
      That was my first thought too. Easy enough to do; they already have the tech to parse your emails and suggest ads based on content. Easy enough to append them to the end of the mail.
    • Re:The catch is.. (Score:5, Informative)

      by orion024 (694922) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:48PM (#10780461)
      From the gMail FAQ [google.com]

      "Access: Free automatic forwarding. POP3 access is not yet available, but will be in the future for free or at a nominal fee."

      In other words, once they go live I would expect pop3 access to either be a paid service, or have injected google text ads.
    • Forwarding (Score:5, Insightful)

      by andyrut (300890) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:50PM (#10780487) Homepage Journal
      My guess is that they'll inject adverts in to your e-mail when you download it using pop.

      I thought they'd do just that too, but I currently use the Forwarding feature that lets you send any mail that comes to your Gmail account to another address. Forwarded gmails come into my inbox ad-free.

      If they didn't add adverts when forwarding, I don't see why they'd do it when using POP3.
    • by rking (32070) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:54PM (#10780535)
      and what's the catch

      There's a delay in receiving emails to allow for the Chinese Government to authorise them?
    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:56PM (#10780561)

      Hardly a week after the coup on November 2nd, and they've already ripped the guts out.

      This is precisely -- precisely -- what Hitler did after gaining power, except that instead of enabling POP3, it was putting people in concentration camps. But I mean, it's obviously the same thing, basically. Same general idea. Anybody who's seen that smirking chimp on TV can see what he's driving at. He practically said it. I mean when he said he was going to do stuff, like be in charge of the country. He thinks he's the president now, which is just like Hitler: The Leader. He thinks he's the leader of the country. It's incredible, it's so similar.

      I mean it's just exactly the same thing. And nobody voted in Ohio. Nobody. It's all a scam. A total scam. A fraud. A child could see through it.

      And now they're trying to make you look at ads on your Outlook. In your email, in the ads. It's so totally corporate. This is corporate, that's what it is, Google is a corporation, in case you hadn't noticed, okay? OKAY? The corporations all voted for Hitler.

      God, it's so totally just like Hitler. And now they have the zeppelins, I saw a blimp over Boston today, it was red and white just like the Japanese flag when they were on the same side as Hitler. Didn't you know Hitler had the zeppelins? He did, they had the swastika on them on the tail, they used to be over the rallies in Germany, just like Ashcroft's blimp today. Just the same. Just exactly the same. It's phallic, because they're Christians, they hate black people, that's why. They made people rape Cameron Diaz, because she's black, they hate people.

      I saw this coming but nobody listened to me, and now nobody can say it, they haven't said on CBS news that Bush is Hitler! It's censorship, stifling censorship, it's incredible that they have that much control over the TV news that the news can't even tell us the truth that Bush is Hitler.

    • Re:The catch is.. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by zurab (188064) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:06PM (#10780687)
      My guess is that they'll inject adverts in to your e-mail when you download it using pop.

      And how would that be different from spam? If it's a free e-mail company tagline at the end of the message it may be understandable, but if they start injecting full-fledged ads like

      Hey Joe,

      Good seeing you the other day. We're gonna catch the game next weekend, interested?

      Sponsored Google Ad
      --------------------
      FiNd YOUR ClAsSmAtEs NOW!
      http://www.spammersheaven.com/?trackinglink= fjdqpo adkjfjopwpfjkdowl
      --------------------
      SPORTS betting, largest offshore CASINO!
      FREE $20 mAtChInG bEt!!! You WIN!!!
      http://www.spammersheavencasino.com/?track inglink= asfaskdjfowjfksadljdsofj
      --------------------

      Let me know.

      Bob


      Not only may it be illegal in some states, people will not use the service. People already get extremely annoyed by bloated Hotmail taglines as it is; this type of thing would be a complete disaster.
      • Re:The catch is.. (Score:3, Insightful)

        by abertoll (460221)
        I guess because you don't agree to receive spam, and you agree to receive these ads. Not to mention, each email will contain something you probably did want to read.

        This would be bad though, because it would mean that any local spam filters will become useless.
      • Re:The catch is.. (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Repton (60818)
        Not only may it be illegal in some states, people will not use the service.

        Exactly ... If it is substantially annoying, people won't use it. If people don't use it, it will lose money. Ergo, google won't make it substantially annoying.

        (unless they are idiots, but history suggests they are not).

    • Re:The catch is.. (Score:5, Informative)

      by neverkevin (601884) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:07PM (#10780712) Homepage
      I've used it and google has not added anything to the emails yet.
      • Re:The catch is.. (Score:5, Informative)

        by JPDeckers (559434) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:24PM (#10780894) Homepage
        Can confirm this one.

        Sent and received messages, and no ads where added.

        Furthermore, when you enable pop3, you have 3 options:
        * Enable POP for all mail
        * Enable POP only for mail that arrives from now
        * Disable Pop3 (Doh)

        You can also choose to
        * Keep GMail's copy in inbox
        * Archive GMail's copy
        * Trash GMail's copy

        Sending and receiving is done through SSL-ports, and sending requires authentication.
    • Re:The catch is.. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Gentlewhisper (759800) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:17PM (#10780814)
      My guess is that they'll inject adverts in to your e-mail when you download it using pop. The move wouldn't make sense otherwise.

      Have you used Gmail before?

      Having used their web interface.. it DOESN'T MAKE SENSE to actually download all my mail and read it on a mail client.

      The interface is so clean, and things load so fast, it is amazing.

      Contrast that with email clients.

      I'd say there is a lot more appeal to the web interface that just the ability to POP and the 1GB space.
    • Re:The catch is.. (Score:5, Informative)

      by abertoll (460221) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:24PM (#10780890) Homepage Journal
      Or they know most people will still use the webmail when they're "on the go." Believe it or not, but a LOT of people like webmail, it keeps their mail centralized. This might be why they aren't offering IMAP ;) (but then again, most users don't know how to use IMAP)
  • by JeffTL (667728) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:43PM (#10780377)
    If you're using POP3, you're probably deleting the mail from the server, so they don't have to buy as many storage devices.
    • In a help page that described how to use their pop3, it has the option of leaving a copy of the email on gmails store, so it is not being deleted when using pop.
    • by ctid (449118) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:50PM (#10780479) Homepage
      Not disputing what you say, but if they're not going to advertise at you and not going to charge you, surely they would be better off without you as a customer altogether?

      I'm not trying to impugn Google here; I like their service and I might even pay for it instead of paying my current paid-for service. But I am struggling to see their angle here.

      • Heh, why does everyone automatically assume there's an angle in everything Google does? :P Just paranoid, or is there really a conspiracy? They make scads of money as it is, why not a few more free hooks to gain a few more potentially paying customers?
      • Another advantage (Score:5, Insightful)

        by 2nd Post! (213333) <gundbear@NoSpam.pacbell.net> on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:35PM (#10781045) Homepage
        It makes their algorithms more accurate with more data available.

        So even if you never see an ad, and they never make a cent through some kind of clickthrough on you, every email that goes through their system tells them more about the contextual online universe.

        Google is ultimately in a data mining position. Data is money for them. Email is data.
    • Before I had IMAP access, or now MAPI access, I used to set my POP3 clients to leave the mail on the server for 7 days. That gave me enough time to make sure that my office desktop, home desktop, and laptop stayed in sync. Of course I could just tell it to leave the mail there forever, and that would be great for when you want to check webmail from a friends machine, but you get the idea. I would certainly give up 90% of the Gmail storage for free POP3 or IMAP4 access.
  • you see... (Score:3, Funny)

    by Anubis350 (772791) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:44PM (#10780390)
    IMAP and what's the catch?

    apple decided to copyright it
  • It seems like it would map better to IMAP. POP is more of a download to client and delete-off-server thing. This certainly would crush the webmail competition if Google can find a way to profitibably do this!
  • by DeepFried (644194) * on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:44PM (#10780399) Homepage
    I must say that after Yahoo! decided to charge for POP access I said "never again will I rely on a 'free' service." Once you grow to rely on this account for POP access to your pdas. phones, etc. they have you by the short hairs.

    Maybe they will prove me wrong and they wont pull a Yahoo, but for now, I am staying put and using my gmail account as my spam catch all and for its very best feature: geek street cred.
  • I'm speaking out of ignorance here, because I don't know if there's a catch for their POP3 service, but just for reference the catch for one of their other features, forwarding to another address, is that it is "free for now."

  • What's the Point? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by substatica (548293) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:45PM (#10780404)
    What's the point of 1 gig online if everyone uses pop to turn it into offline email?
    • by Jucius Maximus (229128) <zyrbmf5j4x.snkmail@com> on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:50PM (#10780486) Homepage Journal
      It's not useful to me. All my mail coming into my domain gets forwarded to gmail and my normal pop3. The normal pop3 is accessed at home, and I can get to it through gmail if I am at work or on the road.

      My return address for both home and gmail return mail to my domain, thus causing replies to be sent to both places. Because gmail only allows you to define the reply-to as opposed to the 'from,' I set up a filter in gmail such that messages sent directly to my gmail address will forward to my pop3 as well.

      Along with the desire to not be dependent on a free service, this is why gmail pop3 will not be used by me.

      • Re:What's the Point? (Score:2, Interesting)

        by gspira (654441)
        It's not useful to me. All my mail coming into my domain gets forwarded to gmail and my normal pop3. The normal pop3 is accessed at home, and I can get to it through gmail if I am at work or on the road.

        But if, on the road, you want to look at an e-mail that you sent while at home, you can't. I'm presently using the exact same setup that you described, but I'm definitely going to stop using my "normal" pop3 once I have pop3 access to Gmail, because it simplifies things greatly, and ensures that my offli

    • by gspira (654441) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:50PM (#10780492)
      What's the point of 1 gig online if everyone uses pop to turn it into offline email?

      Because you still get to keep it online. POP gives you an easy way to archive the mail locally and offline, and also allows you to use an offline client, while still maintaining the "portability" of a web-based mail service.

    • Re:What's the Point? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by 3770 (560838) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:53PM (#10780521) Homepage

      The people who use POP3 are much cheaper just because they won't be using 1GB.

      Google can probably aim to get a 10th of the revenue off of a POP3 user compared to a web mail user.

      Also, Google is entering a mature market. They have to really stand out if they want to persuade users to move from other web mail systems.
    • Re:What's the Point? (Score:2, Interesting)

      by eliphas_levy (68486) *
      You can configure gmail to archive your email when you pull it off via pop3. That way, you end with a very large backup of all your mail.
      And a SMTP server, which I think is the best thing they've added.
      I will start to forward all my addresses to gmail right now :)
    • You still have the archive at Google and can kill your local copy at will.
  • A common sense move (Score:3, Interesting)

    by VAXGeek (3443) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:45PM (#10780412) Homepage
    I would have used gmail more, but it's annoying having to load up the site. PLUS it was annoying not being able to get a mail count without downloading some off the cuff utility. POP3 is no IMAP, but it is a good start and shows that Google really DOES have a good corporate mindset.
  • fantastic (Score:2, Interesting)

    by nmec (810091)
    This is a great addition to gmail's long list of advantages over other free web-mail services.

    Thing is though, the gmail web interface is so good I don't want to use pop3.

    *sigh* ignorance is bliss...
    • Re:fantastic (Score:5, Insightful)

      by MntlChaos (602380) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:00PM (#10780616)
      Yeah, I read this, and initially thought "cool!". However then I realized: wait: their interface is faster, sleeker, and easier than any local mail client I have. So I actually don't think I'll be using this
    • Re:fantastic (Score:3, Interesting)

      by sapped (208174)
      I am in the same situation. I am currently paying for a 1 year POP subscription with Yahoo, but I will let that expire once it is used up. At first I wanted them to add POP to Gmail, but since using it more and more, I have come to love using it online too much. Plus all the sent mail stays with the received mail on the server where it is supposed to.

      In fact I liked the Gmail interface so much that about 2 weeks ago I killed my email client and uploaded all my old mail into Gmail.
  • Catch (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Beuno (740018) <argentina.gmail@com> on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:47PM (#10780446) Homepage
    The thing is you can leave a copy on the server, and have them locally and on webmail. THAT's what's usefull about this.
  • by VE3ECM (818278) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:47PM (#10780447)
    Fantastic! I can finally use gmail on my PDAphone... Google doesn't support gmail on PocketPC... but I can d/l my mail to my desktop mail prog, then sync that way. Bravo Google. Keep pumpin.
  • by sulli (195030) * on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:47PM (#10780452) Journal
    I already have plenty of POP3 accounts. I would use Gmail if it has a nice way to read messages there. The webmail I get from my various ISPs isn't very good - Gmail is better.
  • Free IMAP? (Score:4, Informative)

    by ted_nugent (226799) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:47PM (#10780453) Homepage Journal
    I can't believe they would do that. It's just too resource intensive. If they did though, I think a lot of us would give up our self-hosted vanity domains. The gmail interface beats the crap out of squirrelmail.
  • POP3 access (Score:5, Funny)

    by artemis67 (93453) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:47PM (#10780455)
    It's being phased in, though, so not every gmail account yet has POP access.

    Apparently, you have to go around begging people on /. in order to get an invite to use the POP3 access.

  • They can inject ads in your Email.
    They can also send an ad to your Email address once every month.

    But being Google they are probably trying to keep the goodwill of the people so my guess is that they will provide some type of service, such as a monthly summary of your correspondence, or something like that, and include ads in those service Emails.
    • If they start injecting ads into email...would every email i get be marked as spam then? Awesome! This sounds sooo useful.

    • Here's something they can do.

      They can mail you a summary of all Emails that they have received and "parked" in your web gui as spam.

      This mail would be sent to you once per day or maybe once per week, depending on your preference. It would have a small obscure little group of text ads and occasionally you'd have to log in to the web gui to "release" an Email that was mistakenly marked as Spam.

      Hmm... There must be other services which people would _want_ to have.
  • IMAP and Gmail (Score:5, Informative)

    by echocharlie (715022) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:48PM (#10780464) Homepage
    From http://gmail.google.com/support/bin/answer.py?answ er=10339
    Q: Does G-mail support IMAP?
    Gmail doesn't currently support IMAP access. As part of our ongoing commitment to give our users easy access to their email, we have introduced POP access. We look forward to announcing more features as they become available.
  • by kamelkev (114875)
    The fact of the matter is that many people had already circumvented the web based service to use it as pop3 anyway. Search on google (kinda ironic that this is how you'd find the screenscrapers?) for pop3 and gmail, and a ton of links showing screenscrapers and converters pop up. Worse yet, some of them came with spyware...

    I think google realizes that many people prefer the benefits of web-email anyway (there are major advantages) and if a few people want to use pop3, then it won't hurt them too much.

    Now
  • IMAP? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by erikharrison (633719) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:50PM (#10780484)
    Why do you need IMAP? Google doesn't use folders, and the label concept does not fit well.

    IMAP is not that much faster in my experience, though I am given to understand that IMAP is by default more secure than POP3. Anyone know for definate?
    • Re:IMAP? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Romeozulu (248240) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:59PM (#10780595)
      IMAP is much better, in that it only downloads the headers of the messages until you read the body. For someone that travels and has to dial-up and has moron co-workers that email large attachments around, this is a must.
      • Re:IMAP? (Score:3, Informative)

        by legirons (809082)
        "IMAP is much better, in that it only downloads the headers of the messages until you read the body."

        From RFC 1939 [faqs.org], the POP specification:

        TOP msg n
        After the initial +OK, the POP3 server sends the headers of the message, the blank line separating the headers from the body, and then the number of lines of the indicated message's body.
    • Re:IMAP? (Score:3, Informative)

      by kormoc (122955)
      Google's forcing useage of ssl and similar, so imap's no more secure then their pop3.

      IMAP is more praised for being able to keep multiple email clients in sync at one time, like your palm and your desktop and your webmail, all in sync.

      It's really not needed in this case, but some people like it.
    • Re:IMAP? (Score:3, Interesting)

      by pete-classic (75983)

      Why do you need IMAP? Google doesn't use folders, and the label concept does not fit well.

      I couldn't disagree more. If they just treat each label as a folder for IMAP purposes it should work fine. In fact, if they are really clever (and we know they are) they could design their server so that if you create a new folder from your IMAP client it automatically "populates" using Gmail's search functionality.

      I think this could all work great.

      The translation wouldn't be perfect, but it would certainly be w

  • I half expect to see google ads when I open my fridge--just sitting there tastefully placed in the door bins.They probably will put adds into the body of the email and people will probably accept it. After all, it seems you can't visit any websites anymore without seeing google-placed ads. If people start seeing them in their email they will just get used to them and google will be on it's way to more profits.

    Now will someone PLEASE tell me how to get a gmail account?
  • Lets just hope this stays free and isnt one of those "You can have it now while in beta but we're going to charge for it later". I hope so, I was getting tired of running POP Goes the Gmail anyway. My geekgut tells me to be worried about spammers abusing the SMTP but then I realize that SMTP or no SMTP its going to be the same so I'll just enjoy this POP3 access while it lasts. At least they're requiring TLS and SSL and authentication. Oh, and here's hoping for IMAP4. Whats next, MAPI?, that would be cute!
  • Behind the glass (Score:5, Interesting)

    by IGnatius T Foobar (4328) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:55PM (#10780551) Homepage Journal
    Google would do well to start turning themselves into an all-in-one computing provider. This may portend the next step.

    Nobody has figured out better than Google how to turn a zillion servers into the world's biggest distributed mainframe. Search and mail could be just the beginning. Google has built a platform upon which any variety of multiuser, Internet-wide applications can be built. Yesterday, it was search; today, it is mail; tomorrow... who knows? Maybe an office suite with built-in document management? Wasn't Microsoft supposed to have done this by now? (Hint: they can't because they're saddled with millions of lines of legacy crud.) Google can. Google has the know-how to truly put computing behind the glass again, where it belongs. And once they've delivered it to your desktop computer, they can deliver it to your phone, your set-top box, your refrigerator ... it is my hope that Google has what it takes to finally relegate the PC to the junk heap where it belongs.
    • by Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:43PM (#10781161) Journal
      They completely rewrote all of office as a broswer based application suite. They evaluated it internally against Office XP and apparently Office XP won. Now, we'll never know why XP won. I suspect that it was deemed more profitable than the browser based alternative. It would take a lot of work to get companies to switch over to a browser based office suite, especially if it meant that the coperate data was going to be stored on external servers.
  • by btempleton (149110) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @04:57PM (#10780572) Homepage
    I tried the SMTP server, since it would be very handy to have a free SMTP relay out there that uses userid/password for SMTP AUTH. Saves the trouble of the complex setup required in many mail agents to get this going at home.

    It works, but it rewrites your From: line to be user@gmail.com, which is OK if you are using gmail as your home base, but not OK if it is just one of your mailboxes. However, it's their server so they are free to put this limitation on it, I guess.
  • The link just takes me to the gmail home page so I can't read what it actually says.

    However, I seem to recall that Google said in the past that by "Pop3 access", they meant you'd be able to use gmail to download mail from another pop3 account, such as your regular isp or university email for instance. They did not mean you'd be able to use pop3 to download gmail to your home machine.

    Now I could be wrong about this, but I think "pop3 access" could mean either of these things in this context, and the forme
  • by Medievalist (16032) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:03PM (#10780646)
    is the same as it has always been. They are algorithmically analysing your entire email corpus (well, that was sent or received with Gmail, anyway) and correlating the data to determine trends, demographics, etc.

    It's not like they are hiding this; it's part of the agreement you make to get free email. They have built a pipe through which a huge portion of the world's information flow can pass, and they are using it to learn things about the world and about the structure and hierarchy of human relationships.

    The data is saleable, but they can profit from it without ever selling it, or ever letting any human agents access information that uniquely identifies YOU.

    Remember, they sell advertising. At a premium price. All marketing and advertising agencies do data gathering, and Gmail is how Google is doing it.

    It's a straight-up, informed-consent deal (at least for Gmail account holders- the issues get stickier if you send mail to Gmail because you never clicked through a use agreement) and if you don't want their robots reading your email you shouldn't use the service.
    • It's a straight-up, informed-consent deal (at least for Gmail account holders- the issues get stickier if you send mail to Gmail because you never clicked through a use agreement) and if you don't want their robots reading your email you shouldn't use the service.

      You make an implied agreement with mail providers when you send email, whether to or from. It's a realitiy. If you don't like that they may scan your email then either don't use email or use some sort of encryption to prevent it. Societaly it is
  • by geekschmoe (244913) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:09PM (#10780735)
    what's the catch?

    The catch is they still have access to your email and will use very sophisticated algorithms involving complex "graphs" (similar to peer-to-peer algorithms) to generate useful information such as relationships (personal and business) and historical data sets. This is in addition to consumer information.

    But don't listen to me, I haven't worked for any companies that do the same stuff with similar but more limited data sets.

  • by adpowers (153922) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:12PM (#10780761)
    One thing I've noticed recently, that I don't remember from before, when you log out, it now says your full e-mail address (user@gmail.com) where previously I thought it just said the username. I don't remember for sure, but I think this is something new.

    This makes me wonder, is it possible Google will be adding support for other domains? Maybe you'll be able to get a Gmail address for free, but if you buy your own domain, you can use Google/Gmail for your mail server (either free or with a slight cost). That would be pretty neat, especially with this recent development of POP3 support.

    I can imagine Google selling a rackmount Gmail appliance (to go along with the search appliance) for businesses, free @gmail.com accounts for everyone, and free/cheap mail hosting (with your own domain) for power users.

    Who knows, that is just my speculation.
    Andrew
  • by tji (74570) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @05:13PM (#10780776)
    I use GMail almost exclusively now.. I check Yahoo! Mail once a week or so, and since switching ISP's I don't use native SMTP/IMAP mail.

    The problems with this (which can be solved using this new POP feature) are:

    - Offline access. While wifi access makes Internet access much easier, it is by no means ubiquitous. So, when I can't get online it would be very nice to have an offline copy of my mail. POP3 mirroring my GMail to Thunderbird or Apple Mail will solve this nicely.

    - Sending e-mail from other applications. I got my Mom hooked on using Adobe Photoshop Album to organize and share all of her digital pictures. And, after changing ISPs (thus losing her old e-mail address) she changed to GMail. These two things didn't mix well.. PS Album uses MAPI to e-mail via your preferred mail client. With SMTP access via GMail, now everything is simple. (other than PS Album's shitty MAPI support. You have to edit the registry to add Thunderbird or Mozilla to the list of supported mail clients. Even then I ran into strange behaviors..)

    --- I checked my GMail account, and it currently does not give me the option to enable POP. I guess they are opening it slowly to all users.
  • Encryption (Score:5, Interesting)

    by manganese4 (726568) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @07:07PM (#10782084)
    So if gmail allows pop3 and smtp, I should now be able to send an encrypted email to another Gmail account or receive one in mine and Google will not be able to parse since they will not have access to the key pair.

    Does anyone know if Google has put anything in place to prevent pre-encrypting email or are they just assuming that the majority of the people using their service will not bother with this?
  • by bucky0 (229117) on Wednesday November 10, 2004 @10:00PM (#10783526)
    Hey guys-

    Does anyone know of webmail/local clients that can do labels like gmail does? To me, that's the slickest thing about gmail, and i'd kill a man for that feature in thunderbird (I'd code it myself, but my stuff would never past QA, even if I could get it to work :( )

    thanks-
  • by Per Abrahamsen (1397) on Thursday November 11, 2004 @06:35AM (#10785889) Homepage
    Try to get away from the "here is always a catch".

    Google believe they have a superior product, offering pop3 support will lure new users in, and eventually they will make the switch.

    Even if they *don't* make the switch for reading new mail, they will for reading old mail. GMail store a copy of all your mail. It will not delete the mail you retrieve from teh server, just mark it as read (moving it from "inbox" to "all mail"). So when you can't remember where you put a mail with your local client, you will go to gmail and find it with google's search technology. Which will be faster. Just like it today in all cases I have tried has been faster to find information about a product I have bought by asking google, than by looking in the help files and other online documentation provided by the vendor.

"And do you think (fop that I am) that I could be the Scarlet Pumpernickel?" -- Looney Tunes, The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950, Chuck Jones)

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