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United States Technology

HAARP Amping It Up 292

Posted by samzenpus
from the listen-to-my-thoughts dept.
n6kuy writes "HAARP (the High frequency Active Auroral Research Program) will be adding 132 more transmitters to bring their total number of transmitters to 180. "When the massive planar array for ionospheric research is completed in 2007, it will include a total of 180 Continental Electronics D616G 10-kW combined transmitters, which the company is upgrading specifically for HAARP," the supplier (Continental) stated. The facility is near Gakona, Alaska. The installation began in 1993 with 18 transmitters, expanded to 48 in 1998 and will grow to 180 transmitters. The final expansion will bring the HAARP array to full power, with ERP increasing from 84 dBW to about 96 dBW. 96dBW is about 4 billion Watts. There is speculation that the project is really an "effort to develop ways to jam the electronics of incoming missiles from Russia and/or China". 4 billion Watts oughtta do it."
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HAARP Amping It Up

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  • speculation (Score:2, Funny)

    by Trigun (685027)
    Well, then there's no place for that here. Not on Slashdot!
  • "effort to develop ways to jam the electronics of incoming missiles from Russia and/or China"

    And Elvis is overseeing the project. I'm sure he hates those damn russian missiles... Oh wait, aren't they friendly now?

    (The russians, not the missiles).
    • There's also speculation that it, along with "chemtrails", is being used for mind control. Just don't point out that it's a crazy idea to those who believe it. They'll think you're part of the conspiracy (or worse, a psychiatrist).
    • by ian_mackereth (889101) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @01:51AM (#14050089) Journal
      Well, it can't be aimed at missiles from anywhere in the ex-Soviet bloc.

      The most famous haarp practitioner I know of was definitely a Marx-ist...

    • They sould be friendly. They weren't back in the 80 when reagans starwars project created this. The initial funding for HAARP came from the starwars initiative. I guess the might have found better uses for it.
    • Re:Ah conspiracy... (Score:2, Informative)

      by CrazyDuke (529195)
      Too Late [upi.com]

      The single-warhead RS-12M Topol has a range of 6,900 miles. The Topol carries on-board steering rockets that allow it to make evasive maneuvers in flight on the way to its target, meaning it can evade any terminal phase interceptors.

      The warhead is shielded against radiation, electromagnetic interference and physical disturbance, and designed to be able to withstand nuclear blasts as close as a third of a mile away.

  • Yes but... (Score:5, Funny)

    by Ctrl+Alt+De1337 (837964) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @12:51AM (#14049890) Homepage
    Does it go up to 11?
    • Even if it doesn't, a 4 Billion watt PA would work great for my band, as of now, some of the people who survive our concerts eventually regain partial use of their ears, its rediculous!
    • Does it go up to 11?

      "... 10-kW combined transmitters ..." - apparently not.
  • by Senes (928228) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @12:51AM (#14049891)
    HAARP is a United States defense project, one of the many defense measures against nuclear warfare. For more information, see this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HAARP [wikipedia.org] (Wikipedia.org)
    • by deglr6328 (150198) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @04:15AM (#14050482)
      HAARP is being upgraded by the DOD as a "defense measure against nuclear warfare", but not in the sense that you or the other hundred odd Art Bell quoting posters here seem to think. Specifically, it is not being used to "jam" or "shoot down" any ICBMs or some such nonsense because that is impossible and is well...what's the phrase here that I'm looking for...oh right...fucking retardedly impossible.

      So why is the Pentagon interested in upgrading HAARP to ~4 GW? Well, if you do some research on HANEs (high altitude nuclear explosions) you will find that a nuclear explosion of even modest energy (100 KTons) is sufficient, when detonated at an altitude of greater than a couple 100 Km, of flooding the Van Allen belts with high energy electrons. (the native electron population of the radiation belts is "heated" via inverse bremsstrahlung from the hard X-rays emitted by the nuclear detonation) It is even capapble of creating NEW radiation belts at lower altitudes than normally found and it is thus estimated, extrapolating from experiments such as starfish prime [wikipedia.org] in the 50's, that virtually ALL sattelites in LEO would be destroyed within days by ESD and radiation damage if an event like this were to occur.
      HOWEVER! HAARP is capable of irradiating the ionosphere with VLF EM radiation of quite high intensity and thus can alter the so called "auroral electrojet", creating a ginormous "virtual VLF antenna" in it by altering its temperature (and thus its conductance). The HAARP is thereby capable of depopulating the radiation belts of high energy charged particles in a fraction of the time it would ordinarilly take for them to calm down on thier own and thus potentially saving the many sattelites in LEO. Sound crazy? Well, sometimes truth is stranger than fiction [apc.org], and THAT is why the Pentagon is interested in this thing, not for some kooky mind control/weather control/ray gun type kookery.
      • so HAARP will be the first nuke target? *HAARP general gets a funny look on his face* "Mr. President, maybe we should have given those interceptor missiles a bit more funding after all."
      • Having watched the video from the seeker on a Hit to Kill interceptor, I can tell you it does work, (when they can get the missiles out of the hole =P).

        And given even your concession that your description sounds crazy, maybe you should be a little more forgiving of other technologies.

      • And you know this because you personally tested and evaluated every aspect of what you stated... Right? ;P Interesting prospect but it's likely "just a theory", so I don't know if we should believe it or not. Who's with me? Let's BURN THE WITCH!!!
      • So does this thing have a capability to alter weather at all? Does it have the capability to mess with (enemy) VLF communications, while amping up the US VLF communications (for subs, etc)? Are both of these questions simply conspiracy theory BS? Is it safe to be pumping all this energy, or can it have negative effects on the planet? Should I be running up to Alaska and blowing this thing up before the USA fucks up the world?
      • I've been a relatively long-time listener of Coast to Coast (the show is no longer named after Art Bell), and I've heard about a dozen different guests speak on the topic of what HAARP "actually is"... and while your explanation is more than possible, it doesn't seem to hold water particularly better than a number of other explanations I've heard.

        I'd remind you that there is no complete official explanation to what HAARP does (it is after all largely classified), so you can really just stop thinking you kno
    • > HAARP is a United States defense project

      Well, duh! That was obvious right away from the contrived acronym. After all, they're all a bunch of LOSARs (Lovers Of Silly AcRonyms).
  • Shit (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Wes Janson (606363)
    The conspiracy theorists were right all along, as we're about to learn for ourselves very shortly.

    Be afraid. Be very afraid.
    • Conspiracy theorists are often right when looking back on things, often the reality turned out even worse than expected by the theorists.
  • by mkraft (200694) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @12:54AM (#14049898)
    It's obviously a time travel experiment.
    4 Gigawatts is enough to power 3 DeLoreans with power to spare.
  • Maby.. (Score:4, Funny)

    by NIK282000 (737852) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @12:54AM (#14049901) Homepage Journal
    They can use it to boost the new nintendo wifi coverage.
  • Art Bell, paging Art Bell...
  • by no_such_user (196771) <jd-slashdot-20071008.dreamallday@com> on Thursday November 17, 2005 @12:56AM (#14049911)
    You only need 1.21 Gigawatts.
  • idle spec (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Red Flayer (890720) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @12:56AM (#14049912) Journal
    FTFSpeculation: "it seems to me like it's some efffort to develop ways to jam the electronics of incoming missiles from Russia and/or China (I don't think it's an accident HAARP's initial funding came from Reagan's "Star Wars" initiative)"

    It could also be that the Star Wars Initiative was based on satellites being able to communicate, and communication in the ionosphere (with endemic electrical currents) was thought to be possibly very tricky, especially in latitudes where the northern lights are a visible manifestation of such.

    /tinfoil (not aluminum foil) hat half-off
  • by xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @12:59AM (#14049927)
    Did I read this correctly: that HAARP only works at night?

    "Ionospheric heating cannot be performed while the sun illuminates the ionosphere for two reasons:

            * Solar UV creates the ionospheric D-region, which absorbs the radio waves used for ionospheric heating.
            * The solar flux overwhelms any effect of ionospheric heating. "

    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday November 17, 2005 @01:35AM (#14050045)
      Actually, to be more specific, the D-region is formed by solar Lyman alpha photoionization of nitric oxide (NO), with a smaller and more variable contribution from soft X-rays ionizing N2 and O2.

      HF radio waves are absorbed mostly in the D-region, and at times can be completely blacked out by elevated electron densities caused by various ionospheric disturbances, including solar X-ray flares and "Polar Cap Absorption" events caused by solar proton events.

      The solar (extreme ultraviolet, shortwards of Lyman alpha) flux photoionizes the neutral atmosphere (mostly N2 and O2) creating ions by ejecting photoelectrons from the neutral molecules. These photoelectrons have energies typically up to about 100 eV (electron Volts). The "hot" photoelectrons collide with the cold ambient ionospheric electrons through the Coulomb interaction thereby heating the ionospheric electrons.

      The radar heats ionospheric electrons to only a fraction of an eV. However, there are enough electrons in the tail of the heated Maxwellian distribution to excite the atomic oxygen auroral "red line" emission at 6300 Angstroms (630 nm), which has an excitation threshold of 1.96 eV. This red glow produced by radar heating is visible from the ground (with instruments).

      I'm one of the "experts" quoted on the HAARP site, although I have absolutely nothing to do with it. However, I find the conspiracy theories regarding HAARP quite amusing. Why? because I can calculate exactly what the radar is doing - that's how I make my living.
      • Supposedly the HAARP-aurora interaction DOES create naked eye visible [livescience.com] scintillations when at 1 MW.....
  • I have no idea... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by FuturePastNow (836765) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @01:00AM (#14049933)
    ...how much RF energy it takes to damage a missile. But, by the time it flies over Alaska, the missile would be a ballistic warhead that has to do nothing more than detonate at a predetermined altitude. I imagine it could be made pretty simple, and therefore hard to kill.

    But, four billion watts is a lot of power. The HAARP [alaska.edu] power page says that for every four watts of power transmitted, ten must be generated (40% efficiency). That's ten gigawatts, and the six diesel generators mentioned on the site produce only fifteen megawatts. Where does the extra power come from? Capacitors? If so, it would only be able to produce a single large pulse. That would be pretty useless against missiles (which wouldn't all come at once).
    • Re:I have no idea... (Score:5, Informative)

      by mpoulton (689851) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @01:14AM (#14049974)
      <i>But, four billion watts is a lot of power. The HAARP power page says that for every four watts of power transmitted, ten must be generated (40% efficiency). That's ten gigawatts, and the six diesel generators mentioned on the site produce only fifteen megawatts. Where does the extra power come from?</i>

      It's not actually 4GW. It's only 3.6MW peak envelope power. 4GW is the max ERP, or effective radiated power, under optimal conditions. ERP accounts for antenna gain. In other words, the field strength is the same as that from a 4GW transmitter with an isotropically radiating antenna.
      See the HAARP site's technical info on phases of completion at: http://www.haarp.alaska.edu/haarp/phases.html
    • Re:I have no idea... (Score:3, Informative)

      by Ironsides (739422)
      I have no idea how much RF energy it takes to damage a missile. But, by the time it flies over Alaska, the missile would be a ballistic warhead that has to do nothing more than detonate at a predetermined altitude. I imagine it could be made pretty simple, and therefore hard to kill.

      All modern warheads use precision timed, placed and shaped explosives to turn a subcritical amount of uranium/plutonium into a supercritical nuclear explosion. If any part is damaged sufficiently, you will (at worst) not hav
      • The second part, involves a critical ammount of Plutonium. Take 16kg of plutonium, put it together, and you get a nuclear explosion. During flight, the halves would have to be kept seperate. I'm not sure if there is a way that does not involve electronics that would move the pieces together that is not similar to the way above. Either way, if you warp/melt the material enough it won't explode.

        Clockwork. You could use a mechanical timer to control the fuse in a weapon using the gun method [wikipedia.org] to fire a pellet o

        • The problem is that it doesn't work with plutonium (high level of background neutrons) and it has severe safety issues (accidental criticality).
        • Clockwork. You could use a mechanical timer to control the fuse in a weapon using the gun method to fire a pellet of fissionable material into a suitable target, thus bringing together a critical mass. It's inefficient and requires quite a lot of the material to work, compared to modern weapons. Does it work? Ask anyone around Hiroshima on 6/8/45... If you wanted to detonate at a certain altitude, use a barometer to hold an escapement back, which would release the firing mechanism at a predetermined altitu
    • Re:I have no idea... (Score:3, Informative)

      by goodmanj (234846)
      pretty simple, and therefore hard to kill.

      So I worked a few numbers, assuming that the radio transmitters had a wavelength of 100 meters (shortwave), which puts a limit on how tightly you could focus the radio beam. If tightly focused, this array could create an electromagnetic wave with an intensity orders of magnitude more powerful than sunlight, and the electric fields associated with the radio waves would amount to millions of volts per meter. With this kind of power, your goal isn't to zap sensitiv

      • Meh. I though a bit more about the size of the transmitter, and there's no way to actually focus the power that tightly with an array this small in acreage. You'd need something that stretched for miles. The upgrade will cover more ground, but not *that* much more, if it's just more of the same.
      • and the electric fields associated with the radio waves would amount to millions of volts per meter

        If you could by some means focus all this RF power on a volume of air the size of one wavelenght, and the voltages work up to the many-mV/m range, you'd be mostly ionizing air.

        I guess this would result in a very spectacular lightshow, and a missile could be severely damaged by both EM radiating from the discharge in mid air and the heat it delivers to that air.

        However, I don't think that there is any fe

    • What about the resistance of air. For every 3 feet your power is cut in half.. So 4 billion watts at 3 feet is 2 billion.. 1 billion at 6, 500million at 9, etc etc..

      Course I think that depends on frequency and other factors but that's the equiation used in the cellular industry..
      • Your numbers, and the implied equation are incorrect. Air doesn't have "resistance" to EM radiation. There is an absorption factor that is frequency dependent. At the frequencies in question, absorption is minimal. Field strength is inversely proportional to the square of the distance.

        Free Space Loss (in dB) = 20 * Log10 (frequency in MHz) + 20 * Log10 (Distance in Miles) + 36.6

  • by crazyphilman (609923) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @01:03AM (#14049943) Journal
    When I was a wee lad, I had a very interesting, somewhat cranky physics professor. I had bought a several-milliwatt helium-neon laser tube via catalog. Due to a typo, they had claimed its power as something like 4MW, which I interpereted to mean it literally was four megawatts. I was ecstatic and couldn't wait to share my great good fortune with my prof.

    I showed the prof the ad, and told him that when the laser came in, maybe we could try it out.

    He repeated "4 megawatts? What are you going to do, shoot planes down?"

    I said, "Nah, I'm a pacifist. Maybe we can zap one'a them light poles around the quad. Besides, it says so right there. 4MW."

    He said "Ah, so it does. And it takes a 9-volt battery?"

    I said, "It's got a transformer."

    He clenched his lips together extremely tightly, and screwed his eyes shut. He looked briefly like he was rumbling. Then, he gained control over it and said, "Well, you'll have to bring that baby in, kid. I'll be right back..."

    Years later, looking back, I'm pleased I was able to give a man his age the belly laugh I'm sure he went out in the hall to enjoy. It's the little pleasures that make life worthwhile...

  • by iamlucky13 (795185) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @01:06AM (#14049952)
    You've gotta love the unfounded conspiracy theories surrounding HAARP. Jamming the Chinese is the only plausible alternate explanation I've heard yet. If people are so convinced that something evil is going on up there, how about asking some of the grad students at University of Alaska [alaska.edu]? Everybody knows grad students will sing for a mere six pack or an offer to show their resume to your boss.

    The array has so far produced localized auroras (go Google it yourself, I'm not your mother), which is one of the effects it was predicted to be able to achieve in addition to providing a theoretical way to improve radio reception, but I've heard some great crackpot theories. Most come from the tin-foil hat people who think it's a mind control device, but there's some lame stuff like destroying the ozone layer over only blue or only red states so Democrats/Republicans will all die of skin cancer or find oil sources for the big companies with government funding. The best, however, is the suggestion that it controls earthquakes. 'HAARP' + 'earthquake' is an entertaining google search. Iran, Sumatra, you name it. It was a secret government attack. Oh yeah, don't forget Hurricane Katrina. Obviously a creation of HAARP.
    • I have set up firefox with the BBC news liveboorkmarks. Yesterday I saw a headline that said the US army finally admitted using phosphorus bombs against human targets (but of course denied killing civillians and denied the fact that these bombs which deployed chemicals were chemical weapons). Just earlier that day US officials in London had denied using these weapons against humans. They were continuing the same lie they had been telling since the attack on fallujia.

      I then went over to CNN to see what they
      • by Derling Whirvish (636322) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @04:52AM (#14050590) Journal
        Yesterday I saw a headline that said the US army finally admitted using phosphorus bombs

        The Army has never denied that.

        Just earlier that day US officials in London had denied using these weapons

        There was only one official making that claim. He is Ambassador Tuttle -- a crony of Bush. His last job was an auto dealer for goodness' sake. He is not qualified to comment on Army weaponry, much less be the ambassador. He's clueless.

        Here's his bio from the State Dept web site [state.gov]:

        Robert Holmes Tuttle was sworn in as U.S. Ambassador to the Court of St. James's on July 14, 2005. A businessman with extensive experience in the private sector, Mr. Tuttle is Co-Managing Partner of Tuttle-Click Automotive Group, one of the largest automobile dealer organizations in the United States.
        You can't claim a vast government conspiracy to cover-up something simply because one idiot in London spouted off before checking the facts. Well, you can actually, but you will look like an idiot if you do.
    • HAARP: The Swiss Army Knife of Conspiracy Theories.

      I don't think I've heard of any one project being the source of so many "evil" events, natural and man-made. Hell, some people will even claim is was used to steer and strengthen a hurricane to further some mysterious group's plan for global depopulation in once sentence, and in the very next claim it was used to dissipate another hurricane for an "unknown agenda". Wow...
    • The funny thing is , if the crackpots are right and it finds oil this is actually a great thing and money well spent as finding worthwhile oil wells can cost many billions of dollars.
  • Well, apparently, it was merely a weather balloon.
  • ...if you change HAARP to AARP.
  • Go Joe! (Score:3, Funny)

    by GMFTatsujin (239569) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @01:30AM (#14050026) Homepage
    Cobra Commander is >THIS far away from carving his face on the Moon!
  • lots of funnies (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Cave_Monster (918103)
    You can tell when people don't know much about a topic or have no opinion .. the posts are dominated by jokes and funny moderated posts.

    Bring on the informative and insightful posts.

  • http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0964881209 [amazon.com]

    (yes, no affiliate code in that link...amazing)
  • Listen to HAARP (Score:2, Informative)

    by medazinol (540033)
    Rejoice in the sounds of HAARP presented by Art Bell, an avid HAM operator. Pretty weird sounds to be just for jamming signals. I think they're up to no good. 4 BILLION WATTS is a lot of power to be pumping into the ionosphere... http://mfile.akamai.com/5022/rm/artbell.download.a kamai.com/5022/clips/04/09/091904_what_is_haarp.rm [akamai.com]
    • see. tyhats thr problems with conspirecy people. They jump on some deatil that sounds odd. or 'too big' without knowing what the hell there talking about.
      Please do some research and understand what 4 Billion Watts ERP means.

  • I think this is what they are really building, aReflex cannon [robotech.com]. Zentraedi [wikipedia.org] fleet watch out!
  • by Dr. Null (737669) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @03:07AM (#14050284)
    Just to make sure that everybody is up to speed on that stated power, Let me Clarify something about antenna radiation. What was quoted was 4 billion watts ERP. The term ERP means Effective Radiated Power compared to that of a simple dipole antenna. This is a sort of measure of power density, not absolute power. Power stated as ERP is a measure of the power radiated and how narrow the radiation beam is. High ERP power is very much like looking at a narrow laser beam from a great distance. The beam looks bright, so if you think that the light is coming from a source that is shining in all directions, then it is as if the light source is shining with megawatts of power. Although the beam is bright, it is very narrow in extent, thus the real power radiated is small. For antennas, the beam width is proportional to a measure called antenna Gain. Large arrays of antennas like the HAARP antenna farm have VERY high gains, thus very directional radiation beams. IT is more likely that HAARP antenna array has a collective gain near 1000, thus the real power is more like 4 megawatts, not gigawatts (something that can be supplied by on base generators).

    Megawatts of RF power is big, but not big enough to knock down ICBMs. The Idea with HAARP is to use the RF power to heat the Ionosphere in the northern latitudes where there are enormous currents induced by the Aurora. The power sloshing around in the upper Ionosphere is of the order of Terawatts. They hope to modulate these rivers of currents by locally heating small spots in the ionosphere plasma, thus radiating gigawatts of power at ultra low frequencies ( 1 to 100 Hz)... a very cool Mad scientist Idea... Very evil..

    DR. Null
  • by astrila (881049)
    ... and it's no great conspiracy. Of course it's got goey government funding, most cool research does. But you can forget about the wild nuclear weather balloons. They've actually got some good stuff going on. It's just a bunch of guys in their tshirts checking out the atmosphere with some nice antennas, accompanied by the occasional requisite military officer. Main thing I remember the guys getting at was the effect of the aurora on communications and tracking (military and otherwise). So drop the ra
  • 4 billion watts and that's it? Sheesh. I should put these people in touch with my wife. You should see the power she brings when she HAARPs on me after an all-night gaming session. Those transmitters pale in comparison. Just get a few female spouses hooked together and you could power the planet.
  • There is an absolutely giant blacked-out rectangle [google.com] a short distance from the HAARP array if you look at Google Maps. Virtual Earth doesn't seem to have photos of that area that are high-res enough to see anything useful.

    Even if it's not related, I'm really curious what is so big that needs to be kept secret.
  • You and your pathetic band are no match for my fully operational HAARP array!!
  • >>There is speculation that the project is really an "effort to develop ways to jam the electronics of incoming missiles from Russia and/or China"

    Bush (after succeful missile attack): Why didn't my 4 jigga watt nukular deterrent stop the bad guys?

    Scientist: well... they err... avoided flying high over Alaska.

    Bush: Damn those sneaky commies.

  • Legends (Score:3, Funny)

    by Phantasmo (586700) on Thursday November 17, 2005 @10:25AM (#14051858)
    Anyone else here play X-Men Legends?
    Perhaps they're trying to contain Magneto.
  • It is vital for the US military to talk to its submerged nuclear ballistic missile submarines, "boomers" (you'd forgotten about them hadn't you :-) Yes, they are still out there patrolling and for obvious reasons have to stay submerged. A traditional method is via radio at VLF and ELF frequencies as these can penetrate even seawater to useful depths. But antennae at these frequencies are ackwardly long (think miles not feet), and copper wire that long is a problem resistively speaking. But the Soviets d
  • Billion as in 1000 000 000? You see, I'm European, you insensitive clod!

    BTW, imagine a Beowulf cluster of HAARPs... Could it jam the electronics of a Beowulf cluster of Russian and Chinese nukes?
  • and across the room, a second guitar string tuned to the same frequency will also start to vibrate. Sympathetic Resonance, right?

    Okay. . .

    During the big world wars, generals learned that they needed to march troops across bridges with their footfalls out of phase with each other. It was found that if the soldiers marched in perfect time with one another, the energy from a few thousand stomping feet would enter the bridge structure and set it to vibrating. A standing wave was able then to build until the

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