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The Internet

How The Internet Works - With Tubes 664

Posted by Zonk
from the yay-tubes dept.
Chardish writes "In an attempt to explain his reasons for voting against a Net Neutrality bill this past Thursday, Alaska Senator Ted Stevens delivered a jaw-dropping attempt to explain how the Internet works. Said Stevens: 'They want to deliver vast amounts of information over the internet. And again, the internet is not something you just dump something on. It's not a truck. It's a series of tubes. And if you don't understand those tubes can be filled and if they are filled, when you put your message in, it gets in line and its going to be delayed by anyone that puts into that tube enormous amounts of material, enormous amounts of material.'"
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How The Internet Works - With Tubes

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  • by (1+-sqrt(5))*(2**-1) (868173) <1.61803phi@gmail.com> on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:30AM (#15648819) Homepage
    Quoth Ted Stevens, from TFA:
    I just the other day got, an internet was sent by my staff at 10 o'clock in the morning on Friday and I just got it yesterday.
    Arthur Clarke once said: “any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic;” and indeed, our senators conceive of the internet as a mysterious metaphysical entity. Ted Stevens seems to have “recieved an internet,” after all, sometime yesterday.

    Isn't it bizarre having sub-literate legislators who determine the future of our livelihood: the internet?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:40AM (#15648840)

      The sad part here is that this guy feels qualified to stand up and lecture everyone on why he voted like he did, despite the fact that he knows nothing about the subject.

      I understand that not every legislator can understand every nuance of every issue being voted on, but this guy seems to have developed a strong opinion on the subject. To my way of thinking he needs to have some basic understanding of the subject under discussion to hold a strong opinion.

      • by Tatarize (682683) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:19AM (#15648962) Homepage
        People that disconnected from peers should be beaten with a broken pipe. He's not the only one with metaphors.
      • by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:20AM (#15648965)
        "The sad part here is that this guy feels qualified to stand up and lecture everyone"
        Sounds exactly like Slashdot, wouldn't you say?
      • by jkrise (535370) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:30AM (#15648992) Journal
        The sad part here is that this guy feels qualified to stand up and lecture everyone on why he voted like he did...

        That's the BAD part.. not the sad part. The sad part is, he was VOTED to power by people like us, to stand up and lecture... The corrective action would be.. Have a set of tests to determine which senator(s) can lecture / vote on a given topic. Those who fail the test lose their voting rights...

        this guy seems to have developed a strong opinion on the subject..

        Or maybe he has been subjected to a strong influence, to lecture the way he did. Or maybe no one else listening knew enought o call the bluff. Or maybe the rest were lobbied to remain mute as well.. Or maybe all of the above.
        • Those who fail the test lose their voting rights...

          Unfortunately, this is not the solution either. The way it SHOULD work in our society. An issue is brought up, each congressman is given X amount of time. The congressman asks his constituants their opinion and their majority rules. The congressman then uses the majority of his constituants decision to vote. He doesn't have to debate with his other congressman, he has to debate with us.

          Alas our society is not like that. We vote for a guy, and t
        • by Petrushka (815171) on Monday July 03, 2006 @08:32AM (#15649588)

          Have a set of tests to determine which senator(s) can lecture / vote on a given topic. Those who fail the test lose their voting rights...

          ALTERNATIVELY!!, YOU!! COULD!! -- oh wait, I'll stop yelling. Alternatively, you could consider the system that was practised in ancient Athens -- every elected official, upon leaving office, underwent an independent audit of his conduct in office. Those found wanting were prosecuted for abuse of power -- and not too infrequently, I might add. I've often wondered why this isn't practised nowadays. It's just too haphazard, this being held accountable only when someone happens to call you on something you've done.

      • by Tatarize (682683) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:35AM (#15649008) Homepage
        Show some respect!

        The man is the President Pro Tempore. If the President, Vice President and Speaker of the House die... he becomes President of the United States. ... ... oh shit.
      • It is so much easier to develop a strong opinion when you don't know what you are talking about!

        Anyway, what do you expect from somebody elected ? You cannot win any election without an inflated ego and strong opinion.
        Not saying that for trolling, but fighting to be elected is essentially a media fight. People elected are showmen and they need to believe in themself, they need to feel they know everything to look credible.

        The job of the politician is to get elected. That's the job of their teams to understa
      • by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:49AM (#15649039)
        The sad part here is that this guy feels qualified to stand up and lecture everyone on why he voted like he did, despite the fact that he knows nothing about the subject.
        Yeah, he should quit Senate and join Slashdot, where he obviously belongs. ;-)
      • by rmckeethen (130580) on Monday July 03, 2006 @06:08AM (#15649101)

        Since when has a lack of understanding ever stopped a politician from meddling in someone else's affairs?

        • Of exactly what part of money did you detect a lack in the political process?

          What's really lacking in the system is transparency.

          While privacy (or, at least the veneer thereof) is certainly a requirement, what of the ethic that whatever I'm doing, I should be comfortable admitting publicly? IOW, conscience.
      • Funny (Score:5, Funny)

        by SamSim (630795) on Monday July 03, 2006 @06:23AM (#15649139) Homepage Journal
        needs to have some basic understanding of the subject under discussion to hold a strong opinion

        Hahahahahaha! Aha! Ha! Oh man! *wipes away tear*

      • Reminds of me of the theory about why Bush always sounds like he's explaining things to a bunch of pre-schoolers - he's just repeating things the exact way they were explained to him.

        Chances are Stevens (not exactly renowned as a world-class legislator, see: Bridge to Nowhere pork scandal) has been listening to lobbyist who has as much respect for his intelligence as Stevens has for taxpayers and constituents.

    • by hazem (472289) on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:45AM (#15648861) Journal
      Well, that explains why Google is giving so much room in their inboxes. You just never know when you might receive an internet or two. Next thing you know, you'll be getting whole spam internets.
    • by gkhan1 (886823) <oskarsigvardssonNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:48AM (#15648871)
      And also, by "an internet was sent by my staff" I assume he means an email. Since when does it take days for an email to arrive? It's nutters! I'll say it again, who the fuck votes for these guys????
      • by mcvos (645701) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:15AM (#15648952)
        And also, by "an internet was sent by my staff" I assume he means an email. Since when does it take days for an email to arrive? It's nutters! I'll say it again, who the fuck votes for these guys????
        It can take days, and it always could. It has little to do with congestion of the lines, and a lot to do with bad configuration of networks, servers and mailreaders.
    • by 10Ghz (453478) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:22AM (#15648970)
      So, we have now established that this individual is 100% ignorant when it comes to this particular subject-matter. Instead of whining about it on /., has any of you actually contacted him and told him that he's wrong?
  • by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohnNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:31AM (#15648821) Journal
    Poor guy, doesn't even know his head from his tube.

    I read the whole thing in hopes that he was addressing why the government & pentagon use their own equipment and lines for communications but he wasn't.

    One would hope that if you were planning on giving a speech about the internet that you would either pay an aide to sit you down and brief you on it ... or you would at least Google it [google.com].

    Hopefully this will be somewhat of a wake-up call for politicians to educate themselves on the topic of the internet before they start passing legislation on net neutrality. I doubt it though.

    I can laugh at this guy, but if I think of any member of my immediate family they probably think of the internet as a "magic tube" just as much as Senator Ted Stevens. I could go through the frustrating process of trying to explain it to them but that's not so enticing.
  • by Serveert (102805) on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:33AM (#15648827)
    Senator Ted Stevens,

    Your ignorant words accomplish nothing except make you look like an idiot. Just save your breath, shut up, vote against net neutrality, and take your bribe money like a good little corrupt politician.
  • by BrynM (217883) * on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:34AM (#15648828) Homepage Journal

    Internet?!? That bozo can't even understand Netflix:

    "There's one company now you can sign up and you can get a movie delivered to your house daily by delivery service. Okay. And currently it comes to your house, it gets put in the mail box when you get home and you change your order but you pay for that, right.

    "But this service isn't going to go through the interent and what you do is you just go to a place on the internet and you order your movie and guess what you can order ten of them delivered to you and the delivery charge is free."

    I'm calling Netflix in the morning to ask where my other 7 DVDs are... and argue that I shouldn't be charged for changing my Queue. I'll also ask them where their non-internet website is at. My other 7 DVDs better arrive when I get home!

    CSPAN is sometimes indistinguishable from Comedy Central. I can't believe this guy is the President pro Tempore of the senate (third in line of presidential succession). He also chairs the Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. If you voted for this asshat, do the rest of us a favor and please don't ever vote again.
    • by hyfe (641811) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:01AM (#15648910)
      If you voted for this asshat, do the rest of us a favor and please don't ever vote again.

      A majority of the US population seem to have taken variations of this advice already.

      Besides, this is a variantion of the whole 'only the intelligent know they're stupid'-problem.. if you have everybody who realise they're wrong withdraw because of their own perceived stupidity, you'll just be left with the people who weren't capable of realising their errors. Learning is doing mistakes; people who never do mistakes are just good at shifting blame.

  • And the humour is? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by riflemann (190895) <riflemann@bb.cTE ... t minus caffeine> on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:34AM (#15648829)
    Network engineers talk about 'pipes' all the time when it comes to internet links. Tubes, pipes, same thing no?

    Sounds like a good analogy to me.
    • The joke's on us (Score:4, Interesting)

      by pedantic bore (740196) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:14AM (#15648949)
      This "tube" metaphor doesn't seem bad at all, especially given his audience. As the parent post pointed out, if he'd used "pipes" instead of "tubes" it wouldn't be a slashdot story...

      Seriously -- do you expect him to hand out copies of a few dozen RFCs and a map of the backbone sites and say "here, read this, and everything will be crystal clear." Politicians have better things to do than try to understand BGP.

    • by smchris (464899)
      In all fairness, the guy is a politician. He's almost certainly only saying what his aide wrote for him after his aide told him it was a good analogy.

      And being a Republican from Alaska, you have to figure he has pipelines on the mind.

  • by gkhan1 (886823) <oskarsigvardssonNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:42AM (#15648850)
    This is the same guy the threatened to quit the senate if funds for building a brige that led to nowhere in alaska was used for relief after hurricane Katrina. He is mindbogginly isnane, he is. Who the fuck votes for these guys?
  • by palad1 (571416) on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:43AM (#15648855)
    Stop making fun of him, this guy is right.

    Proof is, most emails I get are along those lines :

  • Tubes hah! (Score:5, Funny)

    by taniwha (70410) on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:46AM (#15648867) Homepage Journal
    in my country we use transistors ....
  • by vistic (556838) on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:46AM (#15648868)
    ...the quote in the summary is actually the most accurate thing he said.

    "I don't have to have the type of speed they're introducing, but the people who are streaming through 10-12 movies at a time or a whole book at a time... for consumers use, those are not you and me, they're not the consumers, those are providers."
  • by peteb0 (798424) on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:50AM (#15648879)
    Stevens made this speech DAYS ago -- yet it's just getting to slashdot TODAY???? Those damned tubes must be clogged again!
  • by carcosa30 (235579) on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:53AM (#15648892)
    When they mention families, duct tape your ass cheeks together.
  • by Don_dumb (927108) on Monday July 03, 2006 @04:54AM (#15648895)
    Quote from TFA
    "I just the other day got, an internet was sent by my staff at 10 o'clock in the morning on Friday and I just got it yesterday. Why?"
    From RFTA - the apparent translation is
    "The other day I just got an email that was sent by my staff a number of days before"

    Judging by the almost complete lack of any real grasp of the English language or how the internet works, could it be that his email was delayed by the fact that he had no idea what the internet was until one of his staff had asked why he hadn't replyed to his emails?
    • Maybe there's another explanation (not that I'm sticking up for this guy. He does sound like a grade A idiot.)

      Ted: Joan [the secretary], I asked for that report to be emailed to me by Friday morning and yet I haven't received it.

      Joan: I emailed it yesterday at 10 o'clock.

      Ted: I could not see it in my inbox when I checked earlier.

      Joan: Maybe you should have another look. You know how slow internet emails can be. *finds email in draft folder, clicks send*

      Ted: Oh yes! It's there now! Damn slow internet!

      C'mon,
  • by Opportunist (166417) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:04AM (#15648925)
    I mean, I can see why a politician can't express himself in a way to be understandable, but as far as I get it it is:

    Without net neutrality, the internet goes down the tubes.
    • No, seriously-- look at his comment:

      And again, the internet is not something you just dump something on. It's not a truck. It's a series of tubes. And if you don't understand those tubes can be filled and if they are filled, when you put your message in, it gets in line and its going to be delayed by anyone that puts into that tube enormous amounts of material, enormous amounts of material.

      What he appears to be saying is "Trucks, unlike the internet, have infinite capacity. You can continue to dump things

  • by i_like_spam (874080) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:06AM (#15648931) Journal
    He has obviously been reading Slashdot.

          Internet Access Via Pneumatic Tubes -- Whooosh! [slashdot.org]
  • by Christoff9 (868550) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:21AM (#15648968)
    Dear Slashdot Community,
    I know that the very structure of this site lends itself to keeping your comments and opinions contained within the slashdot community. However, in this case, it's not a great time to be so inward. You can take just a couple of extra seconds and make a difference with your opinions on Net Neutrality--go to http://stevens.senate.gov/contact.cfm [senate.gov]. Write Senator Stevens a short message expressing your concerns about his lack of expertise on the subject (even his fundamental lack of understanding about what the internet is and how it works). Don't do it by calling him an idiot or otherwise insulting him. Give him a quick summary of how things actually work. Tell him what Net Neutrality *really* is and why it is important--especially to the average consumer. Then take a couple more seconds to go to http://thomas.loc.gov/ [loc.gov], find out how to contact your House rep or your favorite senator from your state, and write a similar message explaining that you were concerned with the views Senator Stevens expressed to the Senate Commerce Committee about his lack of support for even the most basic Net Neutrality legislation. Again explain why you feel Net Neutrality is an important issue for the average consumer. This is particularly important if the Senator to whom you write is one of the other 10 members of the Senate Commerce Committee who voted against adding this minor Net Neutrality amendment to a recent telecom bill (presumably, a Republican from this list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Senate_Committee _on_Commerce,_Science_and_Transportation [wikipedia.org]). It will only take you a few more minutes than crafting the "perfect" slashdot comment, and it will make much more of a difference.

    Best,
    Chris
  • by owlnation (858981) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:23AM (#15648977)
    ...do not welcome our old clueless overlords...
  • Geek clique (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Decker-Mage (782424) <jack_of_shadows@yahoo.com> on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:27AM (#15648988)
    So the guy says tubes when he really means pipes. Given that his generation didn't even have an internet, at least he got somewhere in the ballpark. Every profession, group, or clique has it's own terminology and it isn't surprising when a non-member mangles the terms. If you are polite, which this group obviously is not, you politely correct the individual and explain what is meant by the term. Given that pipes as a term bears zero relationship to the actual hardware, he actually did damned good in my not so humble opinion. As a teacher/professor in multiple fields, I can easily switch to vernaculars which would leave most of this audience gasping for breath, or at least grasping for Wikipedia if the terms are even in there. I try to avoid that or explain paranthetically what I mean.

    As for the issue at hand, he isn't far off the mark although I think Congress is totally ill-equipped to address the issue just as they were ill-equipped to address the SPAM issue. Frankly I think the market should decide. If the telecomm providers try to double-tap the content providers they will more than likely get a very rude shock when the large content providers purchase, if they don't already have it (Google}, dark fiber, fire it up, and do an end run around the telecomms industry. It wouldn't be hard for the larger providers to do so and with cross-trading capacity agreements, they could probably do a better job, cheaper, actually. Then the telecomms providers wouldn't have a basis for complaint at all. All that excess capacity they already have to handle peak traffic would just sit there, not earning them a dime on their capital investment. Couldn't happen to nicer people (SBC anyone?).

    • Re:Geek clique (Score:5, Insightful)

      by macadamia_harold (947445) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:42AM (#15649025) Homepage
      So the guy says tubes when he really means pipes. Given that his generation didn't even have an internet, at least he got somewhere in the ballpark.

      Except that this isn't your clueless uncle we're talking about. We're talking about someone who will be deciding the future of something he doesn't understand. Understanding basic concepts like this is this man's entire job.

      So, yes, it is a problem. The man's not doing his job, and we're all going to suffer for it.
  • by jejones (115979) on Monday July 03, 2006 @05:51AM (#15649048) Journal
    Next he needs to explain how Solaronite works.

    "Take a can of your gasoline. Say this can of gasoline is the sun. Now, you spread a thin line of it to a ball, representing the earth. Now, the gasoline represents the sunlight, the sun particles. Here we saturate the ball with the gasoline, the sunlight. Then we put a flame to the ball. The flame will speedily travel around the earth, back along the line of gasoline to the can, or the sun itself. It will explode this source and spread to every place that gasoline, our sunlight, touches. Explode the sunlight here, gentlemen, you explode the universe."
  • by eagl (86459) on Monday July 03, 2006 @06:16AM (#15649124) Journal
    By his argument, my ISP should chop bandwidth to your site unless you or your ISP coughs up extra money, because ones and zeroes to and from your site should somehow be more expensive than ones and zeros to and from sites on my ISP's subnets... That is, unless you pay EXTRA. See, paying for bandwidth only ONCE isn't enough, and to ensure that this senator's internets (I think he meant email but he could mean pRoN) isn't held up a few minutes by me browsing your site once or twice a day, ones and zeroes passing along the public funding subsidized internet should pass through various tollbooths, with each carrier charging whatever they can get on top of the network access and bandwidth fees I personally pay.

    Most places call this extortion, and the mob made quite a living doing this. Apparently the mob has gotten to congress in a big way, since approx 50% of the senate commerce committee seems to have been bought off (plus/minus the ones who are simply ignorant). I'm not sure whether to send a letter to my congressman or stockpile .45 ammo and bottled water, but it's clear that the telecom mob is pulling strings here. Pay up or get cut off is the message, no different than the moonshiners back during prohibition, and congress is dancing like the drunken bought-off puppets they are.

    Over the top? Maybe. But read the distinguished Senator's attempt to explain how the internet is made up of "tubes", and you'll realize why I'm convinced they're dipping at both the cash and booze troughs. A 2nd grader sopping full of Jack Daniels could come up with a better explanation of how the internet works...

    He even claims that net neutrality has caused the DoD to create it's own "separate internet". What a load of crap. This guy is either stupid, amazingly ignorant, chemically imbalanced, flat-out-drunk, or, since we assume senators don't fit into those categories, bought off by someone. He's so wrong that as a citizen I'd like to believe that he's merely ignorant, but it's not POSSIBLE to be that wrong about the structure of the internet. What part of DARPAnet and the relationship between NIPR and SIPR nets, and the fact that the "internet" is merely ones and zeros running around wires and glass, is he unable to understand?

    There is so much excess capacity laying around that Google is buying up so-called "dark fiber" (unused fiber optic cable) by the hundreds of miles. How long until these corrupt senators figure out a way to blackmail google into halting their purchases? I give it a year, because net neutrality is big money, the mob never backs off of money this big, and senators need their cut because it's going to be a tough election cycle and campaigns are expensive.
  • by eagl (86459) on Monday July 03, 2006 @06:38AM (#15649187) Journal
    It's as if toll booths were being put up on interstate freeways... We already paid for those roads and we keep paying for them through income and gasoline taxes, so the local govts have no right to collect additional tolls. But that's what's being threatened here, and it needs to be fought tooth and nail. Another example is if cities started charging extra phone fees for incoming calls because they originated outside the city limits. The govt absolutely forbids that kind of gouging, but it's exactly what they're trying to do with internet bandwidth.

    2 examples of why we need govt regulation to ensure network neutrality. It's become an essential national resource just like the phone system or the telegraph before that, so what's different this time? Oh yea, it's congress who has changed course 180 degrees from protecting national resources to ensuring that more money gets into a select group of hands. That's all that's changed.

    We used to be able to trust congress to at least pretend to act in the national interest, but the DMCA, the repeated MPAA/RIAA copyright modification attempts, and now this make it pretty clear who congress is working for.
  • by Effugas (2378) * on Monday July 03, 2006 @06:42AM (#15649207) Homepage
    This has nothing to do with charging Google for video, and everything to do with this [practicallynetworked.com]:

    Thank you for your message.

    The Comcast @Home product is, and has always been, designated as a residential service and does not allow the use of commercial applications. A VPN or Virtual Private Network is primarily used to connect Internet users to her or his work LAN from an Internet access point.

    High traffic telecommuting while utilizing a VPN can adversely affect the condition of the network while disrupting the connection of our regular residential subscribers.

    To accommodate the needs of our customers who do choose to operate VPN, Comcast offers the Comcast @Home Professional product. @Home Pro is designed to meet the needs of the ever growing population of small office/home office customers and telecommuters that need to take advantage of protocols such as VPN. This product will cost $95 per month, and afford you with standards which differ from the standard residential product.

    If you're interested in upgrading your current Comcast @Home service to Comcast @Home Pro, please e-mail your name, address, and phone number to: sales@comcastpc.com. Prior to Sept 15th, you will be contacted by one of our Comcast @Home Pro representatives to discuss upgrading from your current Comcast @Home residential service.

    While VPN is not a prohibited use of the @Home Pro product, Comcast does not provide support for VPN technology. All inquiries regarding VPN should be directed toward your company's network administrator.

    Currently, the Comcast @Work commercial services do provide VPN support. If your company pays for your internet service, or if you would like to use supported VPN or IP tunneling, please contact our commercial services at 888-638-4338 or visit www.comcastwork.com.

    If there is anything else we can help you with, please contact us. Thank you for choosing Comcast@Home.

    Steve Comcast@Home Email Response Specialist

    Stop talking about this like it has anything to do with video. This has nothing to do with video, and everything to do with them turning off telecommuting (indeed, any encrypted communication) [computerworld.com] by default.

  • Excellent Point! (Score:4, Informative)

    by Baavgai (598847) on Monday July 03, 2006 @07:32AM (#15649374) Homepage
    Strangely, the Senator has elegantly illustrated one of his points.

    If the point is that law makers have no business legislating things they know nothing about, this guy is the poster child. Ironically, this is one of the party lines against Net Neutrality and he's now a shining example.

    On the flip side, if the congressmen actually understood the issue, and the way they should be rightfully eviscerated for corporate toadyism come next reelection campaign, they'd leave it alone.
  • by iiioxx (610652) <iiioxx@gmail.com> on Monday July 03, 2006 @09:00AM (#15649706)
    ...because Senator Ted Stevens just demonstrated an artful execution of the Chewbacca Defense.
  • by UnknowingFool (672806) on Monday July 03, 2006 @10:27AM (#15650244)

    For those who don't know about Senator Stevens, he is a senior member of the Senate and has lots of power. He is the chair of the commerce committee. I only follow the Senate now and then, but to me he seems to be the model of what's wrong with American government. When the government need to cut down the budget, he refused to cut a $400 million bridge project in Alaska. To many, the bridge was a pork barrel project that connected the main part of Alaska to a remote village of 300 people. Currently the village uses ferries. Those dealing with the situation didn't want to remove it completely but rather postpone it or at least fund it in phases.

    When Big Oil execs testified in front of Congress last year, he refused to swear them under oath as is the custom. Time and time again Stevens seems to be doing what is in the lobbyist's best interest like right now with the net netruality bill.

  • Highway analogy (Score:3, Interesting)

    by CustomDesigned (250089) on Monday July 03, 2006 @10:48AM (#15650418) Homepage Journal
    There is nothing really wrong with a pipe or tube analogy, but perhaps this highway analogy is better. The Telcos run a freeway (constructed with public funds). While there is no backup, special couriers (real time protocols) who need to arrive within a fixed time frame are often delayed. The highway engineers (IETF) propose toll lanes (QOS) which are restricted to cars purchasing a special pass.

    However, this doesn't generate enough revenue for the Telcos, so they come up with an even "better" idea. They install traffic lights at the freeway entrance ramps, which allows cars onto the road at timed intervals, keeping the freeway nice and empty. They also install reserved on ramps which are available only to cars with special passes.

  • by sgrbear (213362) on Monday July 03, 2006 @11:20AM (#15650641)
    He got the whole Internet in his "In" box. That would surely eat up a lot of bandwidth.

    Just the other day, someone e-mailed me Usenet, but fortunately my Spam filter discarded 98% of it.
  • As a former Alaskan resident, I feel more than enough standing to complain about this evil yahoo.

    During hearings on oil industry price gouging, Sen. Cantwell wanted to put those testifying under oath. Stevens arrogantly refused. The oil execs promptly and obviously lied throughout the hearings. Stevens made it possible. They basically pissed on the face of the Congress, and by extension, on the American people, and Stevens held their dicks.
  • Follow the Money (Score:4, Informative)

    by gesualdo (149094) on Monday July 03, 2006 @03:27PM (#15652220)
    A few pages about the people from whom Stevens has been taking [publicintegrity.org] bribes [opensecrets.org].

    1 News Corp $47,250
    2 Boeing Co $41,900
    3 Verizon Communications $36,550
    4 Veco Corp $31,750
    5 Viacom Inc $23,000
    6 AT&T Inc $22,500
    7 General Electric $20,000
    7 Walt Disney Co $20,000
    9 BAE Systems $19,000
    10 Northrop Grumman $18,000
    11 Cubic Corp $17,250
    12 Mantech International $16,500
    13 Intergraph Corp $15,600
    14 Cassidy & Assoc/Interpublic Group $15,569
    15 General Dynamics $15,000
    15 Lockheed Martin $15,000
    15 Northern Lights PAC $15,000
    15 Teamsters Union $15,000
    19 Science Applications International Corp $14,500
    19 Sprint Nextel $14,500

    Has all this corruption and ineptitude in our government caused anybody else to come to the conclusion that gun control is a bad idea?

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