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Yahoo Pushing IE7 On Firefox Users 300

Posted by kdawson
from the buy-my-free-browser-please dept.
El Lobo writes "Looks like things are heating up again in the browser wars. Google has been openly supporting Firefox, so now Yahoo is displaying a new feature on search results pages for FireFox users. It appears that Yahoo is pushing downloads of IE7 from Microsoft and including itself as the default search engine installed in the file menu area." I got the invitation to download IE7 when running Firefox on a Mac, and even when running IE5 under CrossOver; but not when running IE7 under Parallels.
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Yahoo Pushing IE7 On Firefox Users

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  • Fair enough (Score:5, Insightful)

    by El Lobo (994537) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @03:59PM (#17092294)
    They are not "pushing". It's just an advertisement. I have seen worse, for example all those Firefox evangelistic campaigns like: "Make history with Firefox", "Rediscovery the web with Firefox", "Add a Firefox button to your web", "Firefox in your email signature", "Firefox site prefeared" . Hell I've even seen a "Screw IE" button once on some "respected" site
    Nothing different from this "Firefox protects you" official Google site: http://www.google.com/firefox [google.com]
    Fair enough. Nothing to see here, folks [bg]
    • Re:Fair enough (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anti_Climax (447121) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:16PM (#17092440)
      I hit one page looking for a free/open source application (wish I could remember which one it was) and was greeted with a large banner at the top and an audio recording saying my computer was "infected" with internet explorer and I should switch to Firefox to remedy it.

      Now I can understand the advantages and disadvantages of Firefox and IE, but annoying me by acting like a jackass isn't the way to convince me to switch.

      I will say, after trying IE7 under Vista at work, trying Firefox 2.0, having issues with IE6 remembering my settings and finding out about IETab [mozdev.org], the switch was an easy decision for me. Pundit asshattery hurt rather than helped the situation.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Salmar (991564)
        There's no question that using Internet Explorer greatly compromises your internet security (now slightly less so with IE7), but yeah, an audio recording imforming you of a browser 'infection' is a bit much. I've even seen some relatively small anti-IE buttons that were similarly disrespectful. Insulting IE users isn't the way to win converts, even if Firefox is the most advanced, customizable and secure browser around.

        That said, I'm still a bit miffed that Mozilla hasn't remedied their JavaScript issues
      • Re:Fair enough (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Anne Honime (828246) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @10:15PM (#17095084)

        I hit one page looking for a free/open source application (wish I could remember which one it was) and was greeted with a large banner at the top and an audio recording saying my computer was "infected" with internet explorer and I should switch to Firefox to remedy it.

        Now I can understand the advantages and disadvantages of Firefox and IE, but annoying me by acting like a jackass isn't the way to convince me to switch.

        After years of us, users of alternative browsers (opera, netscape 4, etc.), we've been fed up by litteraly thousands of "I don't care if it displays badly on your monitor because only IE matters" sites, you find offensive that a correctly designed site reminds you in a mild way that your attitude (among millions of "I pee on W3C standards" like you) has and will harm you ? Now that you're eating your own food, that sounds seriously funny. But I must admit a wave sound is a bit too much ; personaly, I validate my pages and make a warning that my site won't support any broken browser. This links to a list of good browsers, and IE isn't in it, full stop.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by a.d.trick (894813)
        I'm guessing you know almost nothing about web development.

        While this is hardly a good excuse, the fact that IE exists means that web technology is at about the year 2000. Anything developed since then is useless to us because IE does not support it. There are also many other cool technologies that we would love to use (like MathML) but can't because IE doesn't support it.

        As for IE, there's no excuse for its utter crappiness. It's not like Microsoft is a poor, tiny software company. So sometimes web develop
    • by reporter (666905) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:24PM (#17092504) Homepage
      When a market reaches maturity, the numerous competing firms consolidate into a small number of major competitors. Consider the personal-computer market. It once had numerous strong competitors: AST, Gateway, Compaq, Dell, HP, IBM, etc. Now, there are only a few major players: HP, Dell, and Lenovo.

      The same happened in the market for 0x86 processors. The market once had numerous strong competitors: AMD, Nexgen, Cyrix, Centaur, and Intel. Now, there are only 2 major players: AMD and Intel.

      The search market is facing a similar consolidation -- in 2 phases. The market once had numerous strong competitors: Microsoft, Google, AltaVista, Yahoo, AskJeeves, etc. After the first phase of consolidation, there are 3 major players: Microsoft, Yahoo, and Google. Now, the market is entering the second phase of consolidation. Like the personal computer, the search tool is a commodity product with almost no product differentiation. A search on Yahoo works just like a search on Microsoft Live. Why do we need 3 essentially identical products on the market?

      The market appears to be consolidating into (1) Google being the major player and (2) the merger of Microsoft and Yahoo being the minor player. The recent loss of search market share from Yahoo to Google is also nudging Yahoo into being acquired by Microsoft.

      Yahoo is leaning in that direction by giving preference to IE7.

      • by Rix (54095)

        When a market reaches maturity, the numerous competing firms consolidate into a small number of major competitors. Consider the personal-computer market. It once had numerous strong competitors: AST, Gateway, Compaq, Dell, HP, IBM, etc. Now, there are only a few major players: HP, Dell, and Lenovo.

        And hundreds of thousands of generic small-medium shops. And Acer, Asus, LG, Toshiba...

        The same happened in the market for 0x86 processors. The market once had numerous strong competitors: AMD, Nexgen, Cyrix, Centaur, and Intel. Now, there are only 2 major players: AMD and Intel.

        Actually, Intel had been the only serious player up until quite recently. The addition of AMD is an increase in competition.

        The search market is facing a similar consolidation -- in 2 phases. The market once had numerous strong competitors: Microsoft, Google, AltaVista, Yahoo, AskJeeves, etc. After the first phase of consolidation, there are 3 major players: Microsoft, Yahoo, and Google. Now, the market is entering the second phase of consolidation. Like the personal computer, the search tool is a commodity product with almost no product differentiation. A search on Yahoo works just like a search on Microsoft Live. Why do we need 3 essentially identical products on the market?

        Your history is a bit off. There were several competing search engines (Yahoo, Altavista, Webcrawler, Lycos, Infoseek). We needed a bunch, because there wasn't a single one that could be used reliably. Then there was Google, who could provide comprehensive results, and is the only serious player n

      • by FFFish (7567)
        It'll then come down to a war between Google UI and Yahoo UI. The latter will probably end up with extensions to take advantage of integration with Windows UI/Windows OS and/or use proprietary data standards. The former will unleash its dark fiber network in some way that makes its UI also essential for a highest-quality online experience.

        Heh. The next software war is going to be in virtual reality on highspeed data networks. Snow Crash, here we come!
      • As a Mac user, and a fan of obscure music videos and Husker football games, it's been a serious source of annoyance that Launch and Yahoo Sports both require the latest version of Windows Media Player to run. And when there are so few diverse video sites out there, and the Oklahoma Sooners website linked straight to Yahoo Sports as the only place to hear the Big 12 Championship game for those of us living out of state, that means that sometimes you really miss out on content just for your choice of compute
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by dubonbacon (866462)
      Google are hosting the official firefox homepage and are the default search engine. They are paying Mozilla for this.
    • Re:Fair enough (Score:5, Insightful)

      by asabjorn (903413) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:34PM (#17092596)
      I would agree if it was not for the fact that Microsoft acquired the browser market share that it currently has through questionable practices (read monopoly abuse) so the tactics it is using to target the users of it's biggest competition should be limited. From Yahoo!s perspective it probably makes sense financially to do such a deal with Microsoft, but inherently this is more about Microsoft trying to push it's browse platform as a way to lock users in to it's main platform. Therefore it would be better if Microsoft was prohibited from doing such deals because that would probably increase the competition in the marketplace and Yahoo! could make a similar deal with an alternative browser instead (e.g Opera).

      But I would say that in the so called browser wars the government has largely failed at performing their role in limiting Microsofts abuse of their operating system monopoly in achieving a monopoly position in another market. It is not illegal to have a monopoly, it is just illegal to abuse it.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Rinzai (694786)
        I would agree if it was not for the fact that...

        You know, I always have problems with people that begin their argument with "the fact that." Most of the time these "facts" turn out to be opinions.

        That aside, why is it that everyone makes such a big freakin' deal about what browser Joe Customer uses? The argument I see most posted goes something like this:

        Microsoft has forced too many users to IE! They're anti-competitive--leaving no room for alternatives! Too many people use IE! Don't they know tha

        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Alien Being (18488)
          "Most of the time these "facts" turn out to be opinions."

          In this case, a federal court that ruled that it was a fact that MS abused its monopoly position.

        • The idea is that MS is exactly what you say, "Anti-competitive". Competition generally spurs innovation. If MS is trying to win the "browser wars" by flexing their monopoly rather than by making the best browser, then competition is failing to spur improvement. If the "browser wars" were between opera and firefox, or something like that, that is, two browsers not at all tied to the operating system, then whoever made the best browser would tend to win, and strongarm tactics would not enter into the pictu
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by sremick (91371)
          "That aside, why is it that everyone makes such a big freakin' deal about what browser Joe Customer uses?"

          It's really not that complicated:

          1) When the dominate browser is the least standards-compliant, and actually pushes proprietary features instead of their standards-compliant equivalents, it encourages a proprietary web and is detrimental to everyone else not on the proprietary platform. It is also detrimental to those ON the proprietary platform, because their costs are kept in-check by competiti
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      I've never seen firefox advertising in google while I used it with IE. Just because they have a firefox-exclusive home page doesn't means they spam people to use firefox, like Yahoo is doing. Instead, they hire firefox developers and offer monetary incentives if a adsense user agrees to advertise firefox.
    • by AusIV (950840)
      I don't have IE6 to test with, but I got the impression that this was more of an "Upgrade your browser" ad than "Use IE" advertisement. Most of the people I know didn't even know an update to IE was available. I'm guessing this advertisement was targeted at anyone not using IE, not just Firefox users.

      I do think it's rather silly though, that they bother showing the advertisement to users who can't run IE7 anyway because it won't run on their operating system.

    • One more reason not to use Yahoo. They've sided with the evil empire.
    • by Jahz (831343)
      Firefox protects you

      That page is default start page for Firefox, not an ad. You have to already be using the browser to get there, unless you go out of your way to browse to the Firefox start page...
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:02PM (#17092308)

    Nobody's using Yahoo for search, including people who work at Yahoo.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Yvan256 (722131)
      Nobody's using Yahoo for search
      Except Yahoo Serious [yahooserious.com].
    • ... it's about all of Yahoo's cool stuff. Mail, Music, Shopping, Finance, Auctions, etc. Yahoo has the best personalized web experience, in my opinion, and it doesn't have anything to do with their search.
    • Nobody's using Yahoo for search, including people who work at Yahoo.

      I've found that the search-engine bar on firefox has actually encouraged me to use yahoo (and other search engines) because it makes it so easy, I type the search terms in once and then just pick different search engines from the drop down menu. It is just as easy as going to multiple pages of results from a single engine.

      FWIW, in my searches for hi-rez CD cover art, yahoo image search was often a better tool than google.
  • Does it matter? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by uchihalush (898615) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:02PM (#17092312)
    It's not really a big deal because if the experience on Firefox really better than IE, as we tout it is, then the converters will have no choice but to stick. Even if they download IE to see if it's better, the better browser WILL in fact win. We are not talking about people who are reluctant to switch, it's those who already have. If they are not having an enjoyable experience on firefox then let em leave who the hell cares?
    • Re:Does it matter? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by RAMMS+EIN (578166) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:18PM (#17092468) Homepage Journal
      ``It's not really a big deal because if the experience on Firefox really better than IE''

      That's not the only issue. Another issue is that IE has the bulk of the market share, especially among non-tech-savvy users. This means web developers always have to consider how IE behaves on their sites, even if the behavior is clearly a bug in IE. For years, this has stalled progress on the web, because Microsoft would not support certain features in IE, making it unattractive for web designers and developers to use them.

      The growing market share of Firefox has led more sites to include certain niceties, even if they didn't actually work well or at all in IE. This has increased the attractiveness of Firefox, as well as compelled Microsoft to improve their browser.

      Arguably, it would be a Bad Thing if this development were stopped just now it's starting to yield fruit. Competition between web browsers is good, it leads to better browsers and better sites.
      • Re:Does it matter? (Score:4, Interesting)

        by ottothecow (600101) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:45PM (#17092690) Homepage
        There is definately a page on my university's site (dont remember where though, sorry) that exploits an IE CSS bug to display a firefox download link only to IE users. No fancy browser-checking code here, just some valid CSS that is improperly displayed on IE.
  • Yahoo? (Score:5, Funny)

    by thrillseeker (518224) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:06PM (#17092352)
    Wasn't that one of the pre-Google search engines?
    • Re:Yahoo? (Score:5, Informative)

      by daeg (828071) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:14PM (#17092428)
      Yes, Yahoo! actually used Google results up through the beginning of 2004. They dropped Google and went with a derivative of the Inktomi search engine which they had acquired through the beginning of 2003.
    • Re:Yahoo? (Score:5, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:21PM (#17092484)
      Yahoo isn't totally useless as a search engine. Just look for Best Search Engine, and it'll point you the right way.
      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by slyguy135 (844866)
        And in the Top Ten results for that search, MSN comes... nowhere at all. Even HotBot came 5th!

        And it didn't come anywhere in the Top 40 either, pop music fans. Oh dear.

      • by sootman (158191)
        Holy crap, that works! Right after two sponsored links, there it is--Google.

        Well, at least the people who run Yahoo's search engine are honest. If it were me, I'd look for strings like that and return 'Yahoo.' :-)
  • by Daath (225404) <lp@co d e r . dk> on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:06PM (#17092354) Homepage Journal
    Ok, where to start. Let's see... Ok, here goes: So what? Who cares?
    No. Seriously. So yahoo got a truckload of cash from Microsoft. Who can blame them? Not I, posting from Firefox 2.
  • by plasmacutter (901737) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:07PM (#17092366)
    It's not "pushing" until they block the user agent of your browser..

    My school started doing this last year.. I navigated to their registration site with safari and got a nice little "we won't let you go to this site with your browser of choice" message..

    I promptly enabled the debug menu and chose MSIE6 as my user agent.. it then let me in and I had absolutely no problems doing what I wanted to do.

    Now this may become a much more sticky problem when they start taking advantage of the "remote attestation" in treacherous computing to prevent you from lying to the servers of anticompetitive schticks like this school of mine.
    • Yours isn't the only one. I'm a University of Phoenix [phoenix.edu] grad, and they have a block on non-IE browsers on their student access site [phoenix.edu]. Worse, one student I know of who goes there tells me that some classes have requirements to read DRMed eBooks with Adobe Reader, and of course, all though there is an Adobe Reader for her platform of choice (GNU/Linux), it doesn't support the DRM.
    • My bank started doing something similar recently. They don't block IE or Firefox. However, they do block Konqueror. I simply changed the user agent ID and everything works the same. I don't think it's really a conspiracy, rather poor coding on the part of the web designer.

      Of more concern to me is the actions of my local TV news station. In the past they offered video feeds in Real format. Real works on all platforms and with all browsers as far as I know. However, they recently switched to some new propri
    • Sometime I think it would be really nifty to see civil/criminal charges for actions like this. Microsoft IS a convicted monopolist, specifically because of IE. Forcing use of IE is somewhat akin to "aiding and abetting" criminal activity.
  • by Justus (18814) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:08PM (#17092374)
    I'm all for getting riled up and everything, but you know, it's rather more likely that Yahoo is pushing IE7 on anyone who's not running IE7 (so Firefox, Safari, IE6 or lower, etc) instead of specifically trying to get you to switch from Firefox.

    This isn't really shocking or terrible or anything, as it seems like Yahoo has a branded download of IE ("IE7 Optimized for Yahoo" is visible in one of the screenshots) and doesn't have a branded version of the other browsers. Does it really matter what browser they advertise?
    • by HalAtWork (926717)
      Why should they bother? Anyone who can update to IE7 will, as IE7 is (or will be soon in certain areas that don't have it already) pushed through Windows Automatic Updates. What is the point of Yahoo advertising IE7 to anyone?
      • by ampathee (682788)
        Uhh.. Because as the GP said:
        Yahoo has a branded download of IE ("IE7 Optimized for Yahoo" is visible in one of the screenshots)
    • When using Opera 9 (OSX), I got another ad, for Yahoo Answers. When using Safari, I got an ad for the search bar. So this ad is targeted at Firefox, which seems reasonable. Safari is not a target as MS has discontinued development of IE for the Mac, and has said people should use Safari. Opera is probably too small to bother, and not growing in market share.
    • by cp.tar (871488)

      I don't see a problem either... and I definitely don't see that ad targeted at Firefox users.
      Or Opera users, for that matter.

      Correct me if I'm wrong, but haven't we been able to search directly from our browsers for quite some time now?

      From all I can see, Yahoo is targeting IE6- users.

      You know, the ones still using Yahoo. </troll> ;)

  • I don't see a problem with this. I you don't want to download IE7,.. fine. No hurt feelings. I don't use Yahoo's services; I prefer Google. Google wants me to download and install its Google Toolbar, Google Desktop search engine, et cetera. I choose not to and I did not experience their offerings as a nuisance or anything more evil than what I experience when I walk into a random stones-and-bricks store. By the way, Google does not promote FireFox as a form of pure altruism. Businesses make business decis
  • I just tried Yahoo Search. I haven't seen the ad for IEv7 in half a dozen different searches (using Firefox v2.0 as my browser).

    Could this be because I have already installed IEv7? Or because I was using FF v2.0 and therefore not a likely candidate for upgrading?

    In any event, I favor anything that would encourage people to migrate from IEv6 to something that was more secure and complied better with web standards, even IEv7. We'll all be better off for that.

  • I've seen the same thing, and I'm on a Mac which obviously prevents me from using IE7 if I wanted to (which I don't).
  • I am guessing this the next logical step from the toolbar plague we experienced a few years back.
  • Hardly pushing (Score:4, Insightful)

    by grasshoppa (657393) <skennedy.tpno-co@org> on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:16PM (#17092450) Homepage
    It's a freakin' ad.

    Pushing would be forcing you to install IE7 to use yahoo.
  • by Handlarn (911194) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:18PM (#17092466)
    Yahoo and Internet Explorer 7 vs Google and Firefox 2...

    What to chose? Hmmm... What to chose?
  • ads? too many (Score:3, Interesting)

    by tomstdenis (446163) <tomstdenis@@@gmail...com> on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:29PM (#17092552) Homepage
    I just re-opened my yahoo account. I'd say a good 35% of the screen is ads, all over the place, along the left, in the message pane, along the right, the top, ads ads ads.

    Compare that to google with it's adsense ads. Small, unobtrusive, text ads....

    Whether Yahoo prefers IE or not [btw the BETA client works just fine in Seamonkey..] is moot compared to the horrible placement of all the ads...

    Tom
  • by Chaffar (670874) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:31PM (#17092562)
    Use the Lynx/Teoma combo.
  • by gsn (989808) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:31PM (#17092576)
    so I just went to search.yahoo.com [yahoo.com] after eons and what do I see on the top of the page

    "Use Yahoo! to search from Firefox
    Just select "Yahoo!" from the search box drop-down menu in your browser"

    screenshot [flickr.com]

    So Yahoo seems to be advertising its own search service more than anything else. Huh...who'd have though a search company advertising their own search service - the horror. They are hardly pushing it - that'd be forcing you to download IE7 with the yahoo toolbar bundled and blocking dedicated FF+typically Google users like me.

    Utter bs. Must be a slow news day.
  • Who actually uses Yahoo any more, anyway?
    • by Frankie70 (803801)
      Who actually uses Yahoo any more, anyway?

      28% [informationweek.com] of the market uses Yahoo.

      i.e. The number of people using Yahoo to search is more than the number of people using Firefox to browse.
  • huh! (Score:2, Interesting)

    by syd108 (1035104)
    I thought we only discussed about stuff that matters? Oh well if that were true I would have not posted this either
  • Interesting... (Score:2, Interesting)

    by ogott (1004378)
    Seems as if right now, when I'm performing a search on Yahoo.com using Safari, there's an 'ad' on the bottom of the page leading to a download of the Yahoo Toolbar for IE or Firefox (explicitly for Win, Mac, Linux). On the other hand, when I use Firefox (under Mac OSX as well), there is the link for IE7 instead.
  • by Chris Tyler (2180) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:45PM (#17092688) Homepage
    I just tried a search on Yahoo and got the same ad. They must have checked the User Agent string to see that I was using Firefox. But why didn't they check to see if I was using Windows? -- why bother advertising IE to me if I can't run it on my system?
  • Who? (Score:2, Funny)

    by Iriestx (1033648)
    Yah-who?
  • Yahoo does not get it. Can you imagine that even now, Yahoo's Launchcast service does not support Firefox! When one attempts to use it, he is faced with this "Error Code: 24."

    No wonder they (Yahoo) are a struggling company by some measures these days. It does not have to be that way. It's because of this reason that it is my mission to avoid Yahoo services as much as possible.

    The pushing of Internet Explorer 7 is yet another arrogant and bigoted notion that tends to lean on the premise that all internet u

  • Pushing users off (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 03, 2006 @04:50PM (#17092740)
    I used to set my family's computers homepage to yahoo. But they have since redone their TV listings so that they load like crap. Before that they made it so that many of their videos would only work with Window's media player.

    It's not just that they're pushing ie7. It's that they are becoming too microsoft-flash-ajax centric, especially for people with older computers and slow connections (yes, not everyone can afford broadband/new computers). Yahoo doesn't really care about these users, I guess because they are not the ones they want to market to. But I do have a broadband connection and Yahoo's TV listings load horribly now (they just changed them to an ajax layout).

    Yahoo is really taking steps backwards, not forwards. I hope that their deal with Microsoft was worth it, because they are losing people heading to their website.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Disclaimer IIARNY (I am a relatively new yahoo)-

      People see what they want to see, I guess... Yes, Yahoo! does tend towards flashy / cool, but do me a favor and surf on over there with images off / css off / flashblock, etc and tell me what you see.

      (go ahead, I'll wait)

      If that's the web you want then get cracking and "make it so", it's not that hard. See what it's like to surf with a screenreader or keyboard only. (here's a search for you: accessibility on developer.yahoo.com [google.com]) ... or on one of the A-Grade [yahoo.com]
  • as much as they want....
    Yahoo is only used for weather pages, way too noisy... and -
    W2K can't run IE7, not to speak about the "Advantage" thingie....
  • Although I am a Firefox user, personally I don't see anything wrong with what Yahoo is doing here. They are using THEIR website to promote a product of THEIR choice which may also be configured to use Yahoo as the default search engine. They are not forcing anyone to download IE7 and unless you run out and buy a copy of Vista before the end of January it was not pre-installed on your computer. Granted, IE7 was listed by Microsoft as a critical update in their update services, but that was the doing of Micro
  • I just ran some searches and it's not doing it any more.

    However, I did notice it doing that every time I accessed Yahoo using Firefox. I waited until I saw their actual advertisement version, clicked the "Ad Feedback" button, and told them what I thought about being asked to switch browsers.

    I think it's a good thing to show the ad to IE 6- users on Windows, but it doesn't make sense anywhere else.
  • That is all.

  • by Iriestx (1033648) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @05:51PM (#17093158) Journal
    Boy.. I just can't seem to find this IE7 they recommend in any of the Ubuntu file repositories.
  • Hmm... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Areian (973206) on Sunday December 03, 2006 @06:06PM (#17093294) Homepage
    Strange, but I couldn't find the ad on either http://www.yahoo.com/ [yahoo.com] or http://search.yahoo.com/ [yahoo.com] using Firefox on my XP machine. In fact, the first time I opened http://search.yahoo.com/ [yahoo.com], the site told me how to access the yahoo search-plugin on a default Firefox install....
  • IE6 for MS update only - Check
    FF 2.0 - Check
    Thunderbird - Check
    Zone Alarm - Check
    Avast AV - Check
    Ad-Aware - Check
    Spybot - Check
    CCleaner - Check
    Registry Mechanic - Check
    ERUNT - Check
    Winamp - Check

    So given that I have XpHomeSP2 + current patches, MS Office 2003 + current patches & I use non MS for everthing else, then why am I worried? When MS makes it a hard requirement to run my current OS then I'll worry.

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