Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Software Linux

OpenOffice 2.3 Released 293

Posted by Zonk
from the yay-free-software dept.
ClickOnThis writes "Surely I'm not the only one who noticed that OpenOffice.org has announced the release of version 2.3! From the website: 'Available for download now, OpenOffice.org 2.3 incorporates an extensive array of new features and enhancements to all its core components, and protects users from newly discovered security vulnerabilities. It is a major release and all users should download it. Plus: It is only with 2.3 that users can make full use of our growing extensions library.' You can download it but be kind and use a P2P client instead, such as bittorrent."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

OpenOffice 2.3 Released

Comments Filter:
  • I wonder (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Virtual_Raider (52165) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @01:26AM (#20664147) Homepage
    When will they focus on usability and speed rather than adding features. It may or may not be feature-complete (whatever that is) but it certainly is not yet quite as easy and streamlined to use even as some early nineties suites... Just my $0.02, don't bite my head off =)
    • Re:I wonder (Score:5, Funny)

      by BadAnalogyGuy (945258) <BadAnalogyGuy@gmail.com> on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @01:30AM (#20664161)
      You must be the other guy who used AmiPro back in the 90s. Man, now that was a good word processor!
      • by bstadil (7110)
        No Samna was the bees knees.
      • by 00_NOP (559413)
        It was. Ami Pro was fantastic. Much better than Word 6
      • by ozbon (99708)
        Nope, there were a fair number of people using it.

        I'm another with many fond memories of AmiPro- I suspect it'd still kick M$ Word's backside now.
    • Re:I wonder (Score:4, Interesting)

      by vidarh (309115) <vidar@hokstad.com> on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @01:30AM (#20664163) Homepage Journal
      For me, the only two missing features is quicker startup and better performance during use... I couldn't care less about anything else they might add.
      • Re:I wonder (Score:5, Insightful)

        by cyborch (524661) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @01:39AM (#20664221) Homepage Journal
        Speed has a lot to say about user experience. It feels slow, which makes it fell like a huge bloated application. Somehow that needs to change, at least before I personally would feel better using it.

        Then egain, I may really just be in the market for a .pages -> .odt converter, rather than a full OOo suite...
    • Re:I wonder (Score:4, Interesting)

      by barry_the_bogan (976779) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @01:34AM (#20664195)
      Too true, I'm doing all my office type work on windows and MSOffice again because I couldn't stand how slow OpenOffice runs. I'll still download this to try it, but I'm unlikely to use it regularly until they make it somewhat more efficient.
      • Re:I wonder (Score:5, Informative)

        by the_womble (580291) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @02:09AM (#20664359) Homepage Journal
        Have you tried turning off Java and increasing memory usage?

        Doing that makes OO on Linux run about as well as MS office on Windows on a P4 with 1Gb (I know, I know, but its the only comparison I have).

        It is still slower than Gnumeric or Lyx, which start up instantly and are never sluggish, but that is not an altogether fair comparison either.

        Of course Oo are still at fault for using defaults that MOST people would be better off changing.
        • Re:I wonder (Score:5, Interesting)

          by Budenny (888916) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @02:19AM (#20664427)
          Yes, I have tried turning off Java and increasing memory. Makes no difference. The problem is this 'adapt row height' thing that it does on opening a workbook. I have some array formulas, and it simply takes forever to get through it. Its not acceptable. The row heights are all defaults in any case, so it must have some other than its literal meaning. There seems to be no information on it, no way to turn it off or find out what it is really doing.

          This needs fixing asap, or its not competitive.
          • Re:I wonder (Score:4, Informative)

            by khanyisa (595216) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @03:14AM (#20664643)
            Presume you've filed a bug with a sample spreadsheet? Do it ASAP and you'll find that someone will probably take it up and fix it, even if it takes a while. The beauty is that it helps everyone else too...
            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by temcat (873475)
              You're too optimistic. For the issues that I filed (being pretty important stuff like absence of Normal/Draft mode and shitty notes implementation), "a while" has already taken five years - and still counting.
              • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

                by mhall119 (1035984)
                Your issues require either brand new features or major re-writes of features. The "adapt row height" slowness is more likely a bug fix or simple optimization, which wouldn't take as long.
          • by richlv (778496)
            lately there have been speed improvements regarding some spreadsheets.

            if the document is not confidential, you could provide and i could test whether it is still problematic with latest dev snapshots (or maybe you can try that yourself)
      • by Ajehals (947354)
        Is this purely a windows issue? I don't seem to have start-up issues on Linux, especially on older and underpowered hardware (running Debian in both cases), but then I only have Koffice Gnome-office to compare it to side by side, all three are open and ready to go within 3-8 seconds of launching the application (normally 3-5 seconds, closer to 8 at desktop start-up for obvious reasons.), The only start up annoyance I have is the recovery options.
    • Re:I wonder (Score:5, Interesting)

      by namityadav (989838) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @01:37AM (#20664213)
      It is always good if someone bothers to post about an application that (s)he is not impressed with (Like you did). But it will help more if users like you give specific examples of what's missing or what's slightly difficult to use etc. In my case, I got so frustrated by the slow loading of documents in MS Office, the ever-so-frustrating virus-scanning of every document, and the lack of flexibility and anti-virus/anti-spyware mess of Windows (I know that the topic is not OSes), that I decided to move to Linux completely (After 5-6 years of dual-booting - Linux for work and Windows for gaming and office documents etc). Surprisingly I haven't had a single format problem in any MS document that I have imported, and I am very happy with my odt documents that I just save as Word doc before sending and nobody has complained. Although I know that I am no power user. So maybe you are saying that OpenOffice is not ready for the power user. But in that case, I would like to know where and why.
      • Re:I wonder (Score:5, Informative)

        by Virtual_Raider (52165) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @01:49AM (#20664273) Homepage
        Well I didn't want to come across as a whinger and I did want to get the first post so I had to make it quick ;) but I was referring to a general sluggishness. It does work. It does work well and I use it as my main suite at home, and I have never had any problems with MS formats (other than some obscure PPSs with macros but I understand why this is like that [and how to fix it] so I don't complain about that). Nevertheless it does take its sweet time to load the application and to open large, heavily-formatted files. Also the fact that it freezes while saving is annoying. So my point was: it is good, but rather than adding extra functionality I would like it better that they made the excellent stuff they have now to work faster. Like somebody else rightly said, making it feel smoother adds a lot to the "it's a serious and professional app" experience.
      • Re:I wonder (Score:5, Interesting)

        by haeger (85819) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @01:56AM (#20664309)
        I am by no means a "power user". I've used OO.o for a few years when doing mostly linux-work. Now I'm transitioning into project management more and more and in this world, almost everything is Microsoft. Documents are put into sharepoint, all documents exchanged are MS-Office and MS-Project is the standard tool.
        Sharepoint connects nicely into MS-Office and so does MS-Project. Everything is "interleaved" or whatever I should call it. This doesn't mean that I can't use OO.o or KPlato or something else, but it does mean that its harder for me to do so.
        Yes, the filters on OO.o are great, but are they good enough for me or do I have to do some extra work to convert those documents? Most likely there's something that won't work and I'd hate to be the one to explain that I broke document just because I wanted to use OO.o instead of the MS-O that the company provides.

        Microsoft is damn good at making sure that it's harder to use competing products than it is to use theirs. Let's hope that the EU will make them open up all specs so that all companies can compete on equal terms.

        .haeger

      • by JPMH (100614) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @07:43AM (#20665693)
        My biggest problem with OOo was that it was far too easy to create spreadsheets that simply didn't work for other people looking at them with Excel. For a new user, playing with spreadsheets for the first time, to find this out having created some quite big and complicated spreadsheets in OOo was a huge turn-off. I now invariably use my old version of Excel '97.

        AFAIK, there is not even a snag list of things to be careful of, that will work on OOo, but will break the sheet on Excel.

        As well as formatting and display issues, as far as I remember the most systematic mistake I'd made was using mathematical formulas on ranges of cells including cells that are empty or contain strings. OOo would just treat them as having the numerical value zero, and carry on fine; but on Excel it would make the whole formula return an error.

        Going through and debugging this (finding workarounds to make it work on Excel) is something I don't want to have to do again. Because I don't know what other things are there that may then not work on Excel, I no longer use OOo for spreadsheets.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Cl1mh4224rd (265427)

        So maybe you are saying that OpenOffice is not ready for the power user. But in that case, I would like to know where and why.


        This is one reason for me: http://www.openoffice.org/issues/show_bug.cgi?id=66871 [openoffice.org]

        I guess since I was the first to report it, it might not be such a big deal, but that's kind of bad...
    • Re:I wonder (Score:5, Funny)

      by clarkkent09 (1104833) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @01:43AM (#20664243)
      When will they focus on usability and speed rather than adding features.

      "they" being every software developer who ever existed
    • by teh moges (875080)
      Couldn't agree more. I usually start writing in KWrite then convert to OOo to do formatting. When I am at work, I just open MS Word.
    • Re:I wonder (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @01:55AM (#20664301)
      I agree, but let's come up with some specific examples for the OOo developers,

      1. Use Tango Icons [freedesktop.org] (another example [musichall.cz]).
      2. Ditch the floating toolbars, dock everything by default.
      3.1 Simplify the toolbar: only show toolbar icons by default that are used every hour (eg, open, save, bold/italics, etc.). Eg, I haven't tried 2.3 but in Ubuntu 2.2 there's a button to toggle AutoSpellCheck. It's not used that frequently -- move it to a dropdownlist. And then we might even see the OpenOffice.org help button.
      3.2 Group toolbar items into tabs (call them the Office Ribbons if you want... the Office Ribbon is just a ripoff of Dreamweaver UI Tabs [webindexing.biz] anyway and I'm sure they borrowed the idea from someone else. Stealing good ideas is a good thing).
      4. Don't flicker in the spreadsheet when scrolling through lots of selected cells (eg, select a whole page and scroll)
      5. Choose good default graph colours and design. Get gnome's jimmac to pick some... he may be colour blind but that guy knows colours [musichall.cz].
      6. Grey-out icons with alpha, not with a every-second-pixel-grey mesh.
      7. Make better HTML output targetted at profiles of browsers... the current one doesn't understand shadows or borders, and with CSS3 you can support that stuff. For older browsers that don't support CSS3 drop shadows then fake it with nested DIVs or something.
      8. Have a strict ISO OpenDocument profile to save documents as... not just ODF 1.0 but check for proprietary stuff all through the document.
      9. Don't use Java for ODF... well allow it as an option but come up with some JavaScript syntax (Java is too heavy to type, prefer Javascript/Python/Ruby or something). Use a P4X syntax for accessing a document object.
      10. Allow arbitrary border images. Allow acronyms and abbreviations for disabled users.

      Some of these are probably addressed in 2.3... sorry for the dups :)
      • I have to use the OO spreadsheet to support some gawdawful SQL queries that are linked to some legacy CRM stuff...but it's like walking barefoot on gravel compared to Excel.

        I think OO would do fine for anyone who hasn't spent years living in MSOffice - otherwise it's torture - I had to buy Office for an Admin who threatened to walk over OO formatting frustrations.

        Wahhhh! Where's the frickin format painter???

      • by mattr (78516)
        Yup. I've contributed lots of test cases, bug reports and enhancement requests to OOo.

        But still, they just need to get power users to use the thing and lots of low hanging fruit will magically appear.
        Problem is much of it requires confidential docs I don't want to post..

        For example in very long text documents I would sometimes see it try to split it into pages to display it even though not displaying in print view.

        Also I just tried the db forms thing for a client to be able to access a mysql db. It is total
      • by mattr (78516)
        p.s. I was quite bummed I couldn't get mysql editing through OOo working in the PortableApps.com version. Worked okay with windows though. OOo should help them get it going and recommending it, it's a very good way to show people OOo and I like being able to carry my own configuration with me.
      • by LetterRip (30937)
        "3.2 Group toolbar items into tabs (call them the Office Ribbons if you want... the Office Ribbon is just a ripoff of Dreamweaver UI Tabs [webindexing.biz] anyway and I'm sure they borrowed the idea from someone else. Stealing good ideas is a good thing)."

        Actually the Office Ribbon are probably more properly considered 'ripoffs' of the Blender Button panel - the tabs for Blender are icons instead of text but other than that the resemblance is quite strong.

        LetterRip

      • Re:I wonder (Score:4, Informative)

        by Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @05:01AM (#20665077)

        OK, I'll play too. Some of these are really usability flaws and some might be classed as bugs but feel like usability flaws to the user:

        1. Fix mail merge in Writer. The whole data sources mess is broken, and the mail merge feature itself is unable to do simple things like merging to a single document that can subsequently be edited.
        2. Fix handling of fonts and typography (starting with being able to draw OpenType fonts properly and export them to PDFs at all).
        3. Fix the style selection mechanism. I don't generally use around 100 styles in one document, and I don't need 15,746 different views of the styles. I just want a list of the dozen or so styles I actually care about.
        4. Provide commands to revert the formatting of selected objects/text to the default for the current character/paragraph/whatever style individually. The vague "Default" command on the menu is unhelpful.

        Obligatory disclaimer/excuse: I haven't yet had chance to install 2.3, so although I've seen no reports that the above have been addressed in this version, some of this may now be out of date.

        • by richlv (778496)

          Fix the style selection mechanism. I don't generally use around 100 styles in one document, and I don't need 15,746 different views of the styles. I just want a list of the dozen or so styles I actually care about.

          well, there's "applied" view and "hierarchical" view, which both improve usability.
          though the bug where set view is forgotten after closing/opening stylist is annoying...

          Provide commands to revert the formatting of selected objects/text to the default for the current character/paragraph/whatever s

          • well, there's "applied" view and "hierarchical" view, which both improve usability.

            Sure, but the one thing I'd guess most people want — a view that shows a list of styles they are likely to need (whether or not they are used yet) for the current document type — is still missing. If the default list of styles only had a small number of things in it, that might be OK, but since it has vast numbers of things I doubt many people ever use, all the "show everything" views are cumbersome. Meanwhile, the "show applied" alternative is no use when you're starting from a blank document

            • by richlv (778496)
              for a new document you might try "text styles" - for most documents this might even be enough, and the list nicely fits in a small stylist window.
              there's also "automatic" mode, which seems to produce similarly short list, but i am unsure about criteria used for it :)
        • by Petrushka (815171)

          FWIW ...

          Fix handling of fonts and typography (starting with being able to draw OpenType fonts properly and export them to PDFs at all).

          Agreed.

          Fix the style selection mechanism. I don't generally use around 100 styles in one document, and I don't need 15,746 different views of the styles. I just want a list of the dozen or so styles I actually care about.

          Also agreed. How hard would it be to have the stylist remember which view I was last using (normally "hierarchical"), instead of always presenting me with the default?

          Provide commands to revert the formatting of selected objects/text to the default for the current character/paragraph/whatever style individually. The vague "Default" command on the menu is unhelpful.

          Here maybe I can be helpful: for text, select text and ctrl-shift-space; for a paragraph, put cursor within paragraph without any text selected and ctrl-shift-space.

          Obligatory disclaimer/excuse: I haven't yet had chance to install 2.3, so although I've seen no reports that the above have been addressed in this version, some of this may now be out of date.

          Don't let that stop you. I'm quite sure that none of the actual important stuff that impacts on people on a day-to-day basis will have been changed --

        • by ILikeRed (141848)
          The Mail Merge issue is preventing migration from MS Office in several offices that I am aware of. And in a couple they still keep a few old computers running Office 97 for specific Mail Merge jobs for (very expensive) Rena envelope printers because newer versions of Office don't do the job well - so they are actively looking for a replacement. It's a great opportunity for Open Office I hope they take advantage of someday.
      • by paskie (539112)
        You have forgotten to mention the bugzilla numbers of the bugs.
    • I'm not sure that a version announced using the word 'growing' is a good thing at all. My ooo installation, on Mandriva Linux, already takes up 440 Mbytes and is sloooow! This is too much already! I'm considering getting rid of it and changing to something less bloated before it engulfs the whole machine!

      -wb-
    • by mspohr (589790)
      WordStar forever!!!

      Absolutely the most streamlined WP ever... great for touch typists... didn't use any of those dammed F* keys and didn't need a mouse for navigation.

      WordStar should be good enough for anybody.

    • by smchris (464899)
      Easy and streamlined -- use AbiWord. Really.

      A few years ago I had the argument with a guy about features. He was saying the wonderful thing about Word is that it DIDN'T have as many features as other word processors. (I can always be called upon to laud WordPerfect.) To me, that's insane. Don't use what you don't need and don't tell me I shouldn't have what I can use and we'll both be happy.

      As an aside, the comparison between OOo and Word the other day was interesting because it looks like Word still h
  • Error bars - woohoo! (Score:5, Informative)

    by Goonie (8651) * <robert.merkel@benamb r a . org> on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @01:37AM (#20664211) Homepage
    Openoffice's charts have been pretty much useless for any scientific work because they don't support proper error bars.Apparently the new charting tool [blogs.com] will have full error bar support.

    With any luck, I won't have to fire up MSOffice ever again...

    • by Tablizer (95088) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @02:04AM (#20664339) Homepage Journal
      Openoffice's charts have been pretty much useless for any scientific work because they don't support proper error bars.

      Then don't make errors ;-P
           
    • by Radish03 (248960) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @02:21AM (#20664437)
      I got really excited when I read your post. Error bars were the sole reason I reinstalled MS Office last week. Unfortunately, I just ran Calc and checked out the new chart tool. Nothing seems to have changed, other than a new, fancy interface. It still lacks the ability to use a data range as error bars for a range of data points, and still lacks the ability to display a trendline equation on the graph. Looks like I'm still going to be split between OO Writer and MS Excel.
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by doxology (636469)
        Gnumeric [wikipedia.org] seems to support error bars.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by kocsonya (141716)
        Charts have been useless for any serious work since always. With every beta test that Sun ran on the StarOffice variants detailed reports of missing chart features have been submitted to them. Nothing happened throughout quite a few revisions.

        A lot of work went into eye-candy like all those toolbars that pop up and disappear, which is extremely annoying when you just move the cursor through the document and your view jumps up and down as the toolbars came into existence and disappear, but many reported bugs
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by antiknijn (752777)
      If you're serious about your charting, why not look into good alternatives like R, Octave or GNUPlot? These all come for free and offer vastly superior charting possibilities than Excel.
    • Take a look at Veusz (Score:3, Informative)

      by xiox (66483)
      Take a look at Veusz [gna.org] if you want proper scientific charting on Windows, Linux and MacOS. [plug]
  • The extensions if done right. As to take out the features that are not used.

    So we have the core of the application and then if you want a feature you add it through extensions. Kinda like firefox. Whether it works out that way is another question. I haven't downloaded this release yet to know if they have made it faster.

    I am with the stay with the features you have and make openoffice faster. What features are missing? None that I really use and if a feature is missing I could probably get by without it, fo
    • Extensions are good for things that:
      * Are rarely used
      * The developers don't have time to code
      * Things the application can't do better natively

      If there are features that are used regularly and can be done better natively, its certainly worthwhile coding them in. Beyond the speed at start up, I haven't found it to be particularly slow.
  • by pembo13 (770295) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @01:54AM (#20664299) Homepage
    as is inevitable, it might help if you give details, and leave out things like "doesn't act exactly like Word"
  • The big feature! (Score:4, Informative)

    by aurelito (566884) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @02:45AM (#20664535)
    The big feature, as far as I'm concerned, is the fact that the page is now centered in print layout view. Until now, it was left-justified, and that absolutely drove me nuts on my wide screen monitor. If it bothered you too, check this version out.
    • by pembo13 (770295)
      Thanks for the tip, I wonder what was the original reasoning for a left justification.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @02:51AM (#20664559)
    I am deeply troubled by this announcement.
  • by RzUpAnmsCwrds (262647) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @02:56AM (#20664573)
    This is getting old. In Vista, the UAC elevation process checks the file signature. Since the OOo installer for Windows elevates, it should be signed. So should the actual application binaries, but the installer is particularly problematic.

    A code-signing certificate is around $100 per year. This is peanuts for the OOo Foundation.

    Mozilla signs their Windows binaries. So do Adobe, Corel, Apple, NVIDIA, ATI, Sun, Microsoft, and thousands of small software companies.
  • by suv4x4 (956391) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @02:56AM (#20664575)
    It's faster than their download servers right now, maybe because the story just broke...

    As for this release, I'm still a rabid fan of MS Office but when I dual-boot into Linux this is my Office suite (got it under Windows as well). It's nice that MS has some promising competition, even if it's not ready to quite replace MS Office (especially with the advancements made in 2007)
    • As someone who recently had to work on a modestly complex text document from multiple locations on various versions of Windows (with varying versions of Office) and OS X, having the ability to use Openoffice.org on all the machines was a godsend. No worrying about differing .doc formats and text layouts. No illicit installations of MSOffice (so that I could use the same version on differing computers). And at the end a simple print to PDF that anyone could open.
  • by mdm42 (244204) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @03:09AM (#20664609) Homepage Journal
    What I really, really want from OOo is a cleanup of the code to the point where merely-mortal developers like myself can actually do something useful with it. As it is, the codebase is just this great big hairy ball of stuff -- completely unapproachable unless you have someone willing to fork out a paycheck for you to bang on it full time.

    Far too many open-source projects miss the point that one of their major "features" is clean code, design and architecture documentation; a big part of the "user base" are the people who might want to live (sometimes) inside the code. That means you have to keep the barrier to entry low for the programmer who is a noob to your codebase. (We could talk about how some OS projects lack developers who are clued enough to actually write clean code or design decently, but we won't go there ;-)

    Until a real and deep codebase cleanup happens OOo is "open-source" in name only as far as I am concerned.
    • by JohnFluxx (413620) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @06:12AM (#20665341)
      I just have to defend OSS here :)

      OpenOffice.org is a horrible mess _because_ it was developed in house with paid developers etc.

      Look at the koffice code instead - it's beautiful. It uses KDE parts, the Qt library, the general KDE spelling framework, and so on. It's modular and reusable. The formula thing (one part that I happen to know about) it used koffice, but also has it's own program for standalone math editing, and is also used by another program that uses it as frontend to math engine (maxima etc).

      I know reuse isn't proof of clean code, but it's evidence of such :)

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by jeremyp (130771)
        I fail to see how being proprietary necessarily makes code horrible. I've seen good and bad open source code and good and bad proprietary code. I think the quality of the code is more a function of how well the project is run than whether it is proprietary or not.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Abcd1234 (188840)
          I fail to see how being proprietary necessarily makes code horrible.

          Well, to play devil's advocate (I happen to agree with you, actually), it may be true that, given the scale of large open source projects, and the nature of the collaboration (anonymous over the intarwebs), it may simply be necessary for developers to write cleaner code, as that code is one of the primary forms of communication between the various team members. After all, it's not like koffice developer #1 can just walk down the hall and a
  • British English. (Score:3, Informative)

    by Ashe Tyrael (697937) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @04:18AM (#20664917)
    Depressingly, they still haven't fixed the British English localisation (Not the spell checker, the actual UI and stuff.) There was some hoohah about the en-GB versions after 2.0.2 being broken or something, so OO wouldn't release 'em. Even now, the OO website still has the same guy doing it who doesn't appear to have actually done anything since then.
  • So will this version finally remember the window size of a spreadsheet and not always open it maximized on the 2048x1536 head of my two-headed Mac? Nothing I do to it changes this behavior. I have to manually unmaximize and resize every damn time!

    And how about how if you try to move to another cell while it is recalculating it keeps repeating the recalculation until you wait for the redraw to finish?
  • What improvements are there that I care about from a user perspective? And how does OO 2.3 compare to the newly released Lotus Symphony suite?

    Does the spreadsheet program have a useable Text-to-columns function yet, and can it use web data or consume web services for data? It seems like last time I checked, Excel was still quite superior to OO's spreadsheet offerings.
  • by carandol (1110309)
    My first discovery on installing OOo 2.3 (for linux) is that Open Document files created in KWord no longer load into Writer correctly -- the default text style turns to Times New Roman, no matter what it was in the original document. Since I work on an old Thinkpad T21 (which takes 30 seconds to load OOo), I tend to use KWord for most of my writing, and only load up OOo if I need to do more complex things like tracking changes or printing A5 booklets. I've filed a bug report, reinstalled 2.2, and now wait
  • by 140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @08:36AM (#20666051) Journal
    Pretty soon Turkministan and Azarbaijan and the little tropical paradise of Tuvalu and the Little Henderson Atoll will join ISO as full voting members and ratify not just the speed track of OOXML but also the final blessing. So hurry up guys and start wasting your time coding "pagebreak like in Word5, cutesy£ greek character in front ofî everyæ spaceê likeü inï wordstarÑ 1986"

    [ducks and runs away and hides]

  • by mgpeter (132079) on Wednesday September 19, 2007 @10:03AM (#20666979) Homepage

    If any admins out there would like to mass deploy OOo 2.3 onto their Windows Workstations, I created a "Mass Install Utility" that enables you to deploy it with a few mouse clicks.

    Check it out here [pcc-services.com].

    Note that I do recommend Novell's OOo version, but I do create the installer for the standard version as well (which I just updated to 2.3). To download the complete versions of the Installation Utility (which includes all files necessary) you must use Bittorrent and get the files from my tracker here [pcc-services.com].

How many QA engineers does it take to screw in a lightbulb? 3: 1 to screw it in and 2 to say "I told you so" when it doesn't work.

Working...