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Social Networks The Internet Businesses

Your Ex-CoWorkers Will Kill Facebook 267

Posted by Zonk
from the just-be-glad-they're-not-after-you dept.
Random BedHead Ed writes "Cory Doctorow writes about the downside of social networking on the Information Week site, with a focus on Facebook. While he starts with some minor but insightful quibbles, he quickly moves to a critique of the core of social networking: 'Imagine how creepy it would be to wander into a co-worker's cubicle and discover the wall covered with tiny photos of everyone in the office, ranked by 'friend' and 'foe,' with the top eight friends elevated to a small shrine decorated with Post-It roses and hearts.' Do you really want to add your boss and coworkers to your friends list? (And more to the point, do you really have a choice?)"
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Your Ex-CoWorkers Will Kill Facebook

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  • Guys I DON'T want following me - temp's from startups, etc!
  • by QuantumFTL (197300) <justin.wick@gmai l . com> on Thursday November 29, 2007 @01:49PM (#21521693)
    The people who run Facebook aren't stupid - there's so much money involved here that I am sure they will find a solution to this. As for me, I'd just block my old co-workers when I leave, unless I strongly trust them on a personal level.
    • by Txiasaeia (581598)
      Unless they're friends IRL, I remove them as "friends" on facebook the minute I walk out that door.
    • by Fred Ferrigno (122319) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @02:58PM (#21522815)
      Why shouldn't you be able to have ex co-workers on your "friends" list? Perhaps thinking of them as friends is the problem. They may not be your friends, but they're social contacts. They're people you might want to maintain some level of relationship with, in case your new job doesn't work out, or you're dealing with your old company professionally, or you just want someone to hang out with when you're back in town, or ...

      Someone else posted a satirical story [pttbt.ca] about Facebook implementing multiple profiles for different facets of your life. In the grand tradition of satirical stories that later prove true, [theonion.com] this is a feature that Facebook desperately needs to implement, to secure their own viability going forward if nothing else.
    • by cmacb (547347) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @03:30PM (#21523281) Homepage Journal

      The people who run Facebook aren't stupid - there's so much money involved here that I am sure they will find a solution to this.


      You mean the same way the smart people at Microsoft have dealt with viruses, spyware, adware, and so on?

      The problem is not with the people at Facebook, the problem is with the users of Facebook, who may not be stupid either, but they are most likely ignorant of how to build a web page, run a blog, mailing lists an so on.

      Facebook and the like automate for the "average" user all the Internet goodies that us bleeding edgers have been playing with for years. There is nothing in Facebook, Myspace or Orkut that I couldn't have done with my own web page, blog, scripts, etc. as far back as the mid-90s. They've just packaged it and put a name on it (and probably filed patents on it for all I know) for "the masses".

      If like most users of Windows, Facebook users just complain about security issues and never "vote with their feet" there will be no reason for those not-stupid people at Facebook to improve things. In fact, since ignoring security and privacy can have a beneficial impact for advertisers (again, assuming users don't see fit to walk) there will nothing but PR campaigns to reassure users while at the same time doing little or nothing to actually solve the problem.

      The issue is not how smart they are, but how much you trust them. Personally from what I've read about them so far, my answer is: "Not very much".

      My response was to cancel my original account before I had populated it with very much information and open a new account with a fake name and nothing of interest to the company or its advertisers. I've yet to hear of a great number of other people doing the same, although I suspect a lot of people who have got a clue will just avoid using it until that is the only way to communicate with their grandchildren (if it gets to that point).
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      "The people who run Facebook aren't stupid - there's so much money involved here..."

      The Facebook people are smart on technological issues but not when it comes to copyright and trademark issues. Facebook's latest idea of using member's photos when the user writes a review of a product and creating an implicit ad, if the user doesn't opt out, is a class action lawsuit waiting to happen.

      Read up on the Taster's Choice lawsuit and how it cost Nestle $15.6 million USD for using the photo of a person, who did
    • by GrumblyStuff (870046) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @04:31PM (#21524143)
      When they let users differentiate friends from coworkers, casual acquaintances, and 'these people I know from years ago who found my profile', well, that'll be for the better.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Feanturi (99866)
      Actually, I signed up on Facebook precisely because of an ex-coworker. We had a friendship at work, and then she quit, with a parting email to various work friends to look her up on Facebook to keep in touch. So now I'm on Facebook, and I really don't like it, because yeah, now I've gone tons of current co-workers on my friends list, one of which I really came to dislike after adding him. And sometimes I wonder about some of the ones not on my friends list, who have some reason to dislike me, what might the
  • People are stupid? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Kintanon (65528) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @01:50PM (#21521707) Homepage Journal
    How many people thought about this 12 years ago and have maintained separate online identities for Work and Recreation?
    I did.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      That's what I call social Notworking.

      My employer might frown on the extensive online tribute work I created in homage to Huey P. Newton.
    • by cybermage (112274) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @01:54PM (#21521787) Homepage Journal
      I Hurt People For Fun

      Does your sig represent work or recreation? ;)
    • How many people thought about this 12 years ago and have maintained separate online identities for Work and Recreation?

      Same here, and I'm very glad I did it. Captain Splendid is completely unconnected to any mention of the real me online.
    • by solar_blitz (1088029) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @01:56PM (#21521835)
      I use LinkedIn for professional networking, and I use Facebook for personal networking. If I know a guy from my work I like well enough to be considered a buddy, I'll add him/her to Facebook. If I know a person on Facebook to be very good at what they do, I'll add them to LinkedIn. It's that simple. It's Structuralism, man - just maintain separate spaces and let them overlap on exceptions only. I'm not going to add everybody I meet at a Conference to facebook, I'll add them to LinkedIn.

      I'm amazed there are people who don't do this.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        That's all well and good...but remember the old chart from health class? The one about having sex...when you have sex with your partner, your having sex with their ex-partners' partners...and their ex-partners' partners. In the end, we've all f***ed eachother. It's like 6 degrees of hide the sausage.

        Same thing applies to social networking sites. You give trusted co-worker Roger your screen name, next thing you know you got Bob in accounting sending you a friend request, saying "hey man we work together!
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by CFTM (513264)
      I never maintained separate identities but I was always aware that anything I posted online could be found by any one looking for it; if I don't want something to be "public domain" I don't put it online, doesn't matter how 'secure' the data is.
    • Yo!

      To me, it always seemed like a no-brainer. I keep a webmail account for all personal communication, and don't give it to work clients. The only people outside work that have my work email address are my immediate family...

      Otherwise, I get clients trying to get me to do work on the side after-hours, and I have to explain Uncle Bubba's "Illustrated Ode to Hooters" email to my boss...

      No thanks!

    • by cromar (1103585)
      I wish I had. Lately I've had to start a disinfomation "campaign" to try and reclaim one of my (very unique) aliases that has become dirtied...
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by myvirtualid (851756)

      maintain... separate online identities for Work and Recreation

      You'll notice from my /. nickname that I did this...

      ...and now sort of regret it, now that I'm consulting and wish I could tie together the various sites at which I lurk, as part of an effort at building a coherent brand...

      ...something which I would surely regret 5 years from now, when I move on to project X.

      Wanna know what's really funny? I chose "myvirtualid" as a quasi-ironic meaningless handle and decided to use it as a throwaway at all

    • How many people thought about this 12 years ago and have maintained separate online identities for Work and Recreation?
      I did.

      How many people thought that their usenet posts from 1992 would be available on a search engine on the Internet (remember, this was pre-web) 15 years later? I certainly didn't. Searching on my name on google groups today makes me cringe. Wow, everybody back then put their real, unobfuscated email address in their .sig.

    • by Sparr0 (451780)
      I did, and haven't. I am glad that people can learn about me by searching for my online persona. I would not want to associate with anyone who would handle that in a negative way, so why hide things?
    • by EtoilePB (1087031)
      Ditto. I've been using the same online name since 1995 but although I've told some "internet people" my real name, I hardly ever tell "real people" my internet name. ;) So far, so good.
    • by HTH NE1 (675604)
      `It seems that you've been living two lives. One life, you're Thomas A. Anderson, program writer for a respectable software company. You have a social security number, pay your taxes, and you... help your landlady carry out her garbage. The other life is lived in computers, where you go by the hacker alias "Neo" and are guilty of virtually every computer crime we have a law for. One of these lives has a future, and one of them does not.'
  • Easy solution (Score:4, Insightful)

    by fotbr (855184) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @01:51PM (#21521731) Journal
    Hide all your data. Add only the friends you want to be able to see your facebook page.

    Or just not use Facebook in the first place.
    • Or just not use Facebook in the first place.

      Yes, that is an easily solution, but probably not one that the people at Facebook would favor. That's what the story is about.

      • by fotbr (855184)
        True. Which is why it was the second option I suggested, the first being to keep your info private (as in, only your friends can even see you're on facebook) and to only add real friends (ie, not every single person you come into contact with).
        • Which is why it was the second option I suggested, the first being to keep your info private.

          Even if you make it "private", there's still a decent chance it can leak one way or another. Like let's say you put something that says, "Only share within my network." So you let one of your coworkers into your network because he's your actual friend, but then he's dumb enough to set your boss as his friend. Suddenly your boss is in your network.

          Of course, you can choose instead to only allow things to be vis

          • by fotbr (855184)
            Perhaps the "purpose" of having social networks is defined by one's personality. My friends and I use it for keeping in touch with each other, so allowing things to be visible only to direct friends is a great solution for us. I don't care Maybe it goes against the trend of adding everyone you ever meet to your friends list, and being interested in what everyone THEY meet does/says/is interested in, but I think thats where personality comes in.

            Take my slashdot setting for example - I've added a few people
  • uh, dont use it? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by 192939495969798999 (58312) <info@devi n m oore.com> on Thursday November 29, 2007 @01:52PM (#21521739) Homepage Journal
    Maybe just don't use it. What is your company going to do, fire you for not wasting work time creating a virtual soap opera?
    • Re:uh, dont use it? (Score:4, Interesting)

      by QuantumFTL (197300) <justin.wick@gmai l . com> on Thursday November 29, 2007 @02:18PM (#21522199)
      I agree that if one is concerned about a service, they should consider not using it. But for me, not only has Facebook allowed me to keep in touch with friends and family, it's done something greater - it's how I found the love of my life.

      My Fiancee and I went to the same high school but were in different grades. Despite being in a musical together, we only talked on perhaps two occasions. One day she wondered what I had been up to (people at my old high school still talked about me after I left due to my NASA work) and sent me a message. Less than a week later, I visited her at her school and discovered someone absolutely amazing.

      So, despite all I might disagree with, I owe much of my current happiness to both NASA and Facebook. May they both live long and prosper :)
    • by Otter (3800)
      I can't believe I'm defending anything that quotes a person pretending to be named "danah boyd" but -- the submitter completely missed the topic of the article. He connected two random bits of it to conclude that it's about workplace issues, which isn't at all the real point.
  • by CFTM (513264) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @01:54PM (#21521791)
    It's beyond me why people are so quick to spill their most personal secrets on a social networking site; it just seems to me that people have no idea that anything that they say, type or post is often available for the world to see. Sorry but I don't like that kind of invasion of privacy and I never have...I can remember being 13 years, being on AOL and being wary to give any personal information out that I would want to be in public domain, but I seem to be very alone in this idea in my peer group (26 now).

    Heck, I've even had people I used to work attempt to add me to their friends list and I rejected them. Then again I'm one of those people who only accepts invitations from people I know in the flesh, don't allow myself to be searched for and never post anything on the profile anyways.
    • by Minwee (522556) <dcr@neverwhen.org> on Thursday November 29, 2007 @02:02PM (#21521943) Homepage

      It's beyond me why people are so quick to spill their most personal secrets on a social networking site

      It's because they're hoping to score with Hot Internet Chicks. Why is this hard to understand?

      If playing every Mario game ever made has taught me anything it's that guys will do anything, even eating strange mushrooms and jumping head first into sewer pipes, for the vague possibility of impressing women.

      • You know that this is slashdot - and here everyone also have lists of friends and foes ?

        You are allready assimilated... restistance is futil!
      • It's beyond me why people are so quick to spill their most personal secrets on a social networking site

        It's because they're hoping to score with Hot Internet Chicks.
        Seriously, I met this girl at a bar a few weeks back, and when I asked her for her email she said she'd find me on facebook instead.
    • by Tony Hoyle (11698)
      What's so secret? I get drunk and on a saturday night? Hold the phone.. major world secret there.

      I mean, from TFA.. maintaining lists and 'top friends' (which personally I don't do, since I don't rate my friends against each other) is fine because it's the accepted way of behaving in modern society. Why does the AP say it's 'creepy?' - because they don't like facebook? Because they're afraid of what their friends think of them?

      I'd seriously consider not employing someone with that attitude because it's
      • Not everyone I meet in this world is my friend. I'm sorry if this offends you, but it isn't antisocial. I don't use any social networking site, but I can't see how rejecting someone as a virtual friend would have any bearing on the workplace.
        • by Tony Hoyle (11698)
          You prove my point in face. If you distrust someone so much then reject them.

          It's still not an invasion of privacy or anything else. You simply choose not to tell them about stuff.

          OTOH someone who posted crap like that about facebook is probably the kind of person who doesn't like socialising in meatspace either, and not a good co worker.
          • by CFTM (513264)
            What is the basis for this claim? To me it seems completely off base but if you can construct a cogent argument around your premise I'd love to read it.
    • by e2d2 (115622)
      They do it for the same reason you made that post - self expression. We're all special snowflakes remember?

      Combine that with social pressure - "are you on myspace, facebook, AIM, etc..?" and you see the trend.

      We all find different avenues to express ourselves. It can be a bit overwhelming, being bombarded with all this expression, personal information, emotions. Best taken in small doses.
    • by DoofusOfDeath (636671) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @02:20PM (#21522225)

      It's beyond me why people are so quick to spill their most personal secrets on a social networking site;

      Probably the same reason we pick our noses in our cars, despite everyone being able to see us. It feels more private and anonymous than it really is.

    • Better than that (im the same age, for what it matters), I just dont use the popular social networks.

      I'm available on Usenet. That right there cuts down on the stupidity of social networking sites.
    • I agree. I do (and have done) my best to avoid being trivially findable. I don't understand why anyone would willingly give out personal information... After all, that's the first step on the road to being seen [youtube.com] by someone.

      In all seriousness though, these sorts of services make finding people trivially easy. That's great if only your friends are looking for you. Not so great otherwise.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Gat0r30y (957941)

      Then again I'm one of those people who only accepts invitations from people I know in the flesh

      Did you mean that in the biblical sense?
      No wonder I have been rejected so much! (maybe thats cause i'm always on /. instead of out trying to get some
      Don't be a fool, wrap your tool!
  • by Trillan (597339) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @01:54PM (#21521801) Homepage Journal
    I can't imagine why, but I don't seem to care what my coworkers think, what my boss thinks, or what my ex-coworkers think. Perhaps that's why I was willing to add them.

    I do recognize that some people have the kind of boss that demand to be added to my profile. I'd simply have ignored him. If I was really pushed, I'd either let him fire me (fun times ahead!) or give him access to the limited profile.

    Again, though, my boss isn't an ankle-dragging technical cretin.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by CFTM (513264)
      Yeah, my boss would never make a request like that, not to mention I think it'd probably be an HR no-no. Although if I ever had a manager who did, I'd probably laugh at them for a really long time, hopefully long enough to get fired :) And as the parent said, being fired for that = some serious fun times ahead! :)
      • by geekoid (135745)
        yeah..except in some career paths it will follow you and hurt your career at other companies.

        And of course you won't be fired for THAT; However the economy is in a down turn could be reasons they, regrettably, have to let you go.
  • by Zigurd (3528) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @01:55PM (#21521813) Homepage

    'Imagine how creepy it would be to wander into a co-worker's cubicle and discover the wall covered with tiny photos of everyone in the office, ranked by 'friend' and 'foe,' with the top eight friends elevated to a small shrine decorated with Post-It roses and hearts.'


    That would be LinkedIn.
  • Finally (Score:5, Funny)

    by j.sanchez1 (1030764) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @01:55PM (#21521823)
    Your Ex-CoWorkers Will Kill Facebook

    At least those idiots will do something right before they die.
  • Seriously, the whole thing is creepy.
  • by mcmonkey (96054) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @02:02PM (#21521935) Homepage

    Do you really want to add your boss and coworkers to your friends list?
    That's like saying, you really want to eat? Yes? Here's some sulfur. Some people you work with might actually be friends. Some are just coworkers.

    (And more to the point, do you really have a choice?)
    Yes.

    You might say, well if I'm friendly outside of work with one coworker and add that one person to a friends list, but then that person adds every one in the office, including the big boss, to his/her list, can't those people then link back to my page?

    Well, yeah, welcome to society. This is not news. This is not technology related. Folks interact. Something you share with one person may in turn be shared by that person with others. It's called discretion, get some.

    • In many corporations politics are critical to your success. This permeates through the corporation.

      Now what do you do if your boss says they want to be your 'friend'?
      This could be politically damaging no matter how you answer it.
      What if he isn't in political favor and you want a promotion to another department?

      Yes, politics is stupid shit, It's wasteful, harmful, and hurts organization. It is real, and in some career tracks, inescapable. Fortunately IT workers are buffered away from it more then oth
      • by mcmonkey (96054)

        Now what do you do if your boss says they want to be your 'friend'? This could be politically damaging no matter how you answer it. What if he isn't in political favor and you want a promotion to another department?

        I'm not saying it doesn't happen. I'm saying, this is nothing new, not particular to Facebook, and not a technilogical issue.

        What if you're having a party and your boss finds out? What if you want to invite some coworkers but not others? Same issues with friend lists and social networkin

    • Something you share with one person may in turn be shared by that person with others. It's called discretion, get some.

      If people had discretion, Facebook wouldn't have a business, because people wouldn't be throwing personal information online willy-nilly.

      This is not technology related.

      Sure it is, because the obvious question is, "What technology can Facebook come up with to mitigate this problem?" What kind of web/database magic could be worked that can improve social networking? People apparently ne

  • Just hit ignore. I do that all the time to friends, family, coworkers etc. They really don't need to see the photos I have posted, nothing horrible that would get me into trouble mind you. just simply a none of their business scenario.
  • in the real world... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday November 29, 2007 @02:06PM (#21521987)
    The problem with social networking sites like Facebook, Myspace; et all, is not in regards to their intended use. Rather, it is in the fact that often times in our "new" professional working environment, we have the view that being professional, is the same as being social. So, as a manager, my employees actually feel hurt when I deny them access to my private, closed access Myspace page. When asked I reply with "company policy, sorry" but the reality is, the old rules of there being a division between work and home is dead. If I try to separate my personal life from my professional life, my employees feel an emotional detachment from me, which hinders professional development. However, if I were to include them into my social networking, they would quickly confuse my personal choices with their professional behavior. For example my peers have received feedback during coaching conversations to employees "how can you try to coach me on appropriate topics of conversation while at work when last night your status was 'i need a blunt and some cock tonight'". Details aside, yes it is the case that the difference is at work vs not at work, but people confuse that happens in our personal lives with what happens in our professional lives. My father worked at IBM for nearly 40 years, and the rules he lived by in the office were the complete and total opposite to what I experience at another Fortune 500 company. It is unfortunate that my 17-25 year old employees simply do not see the difference between work and play. More worrisome is my 25-40 year old peers who cave to the pressures to involve the employees in their social networking sites, and have serious professional consequences when something goes awry, or someone decides to create drama. A possible solution posed by some companies is to create internal professional networking sites. Managed by company employees and governed by existing policy, these sites work to enable managers to have professional relationships with employees, while maintaining work-life balance. However, Myspace is compelling, as is sex, and lurid details about interesting people's lives (or uninteresting lives as the case may be). Simply stated, bad bosses use Myspace as a way to monitor or snoop on employees personal lives. As such, everyone, Managers and Employees alike should view it with a healthy dose of skepticism and distrust.
  • What is Facebook? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by zappepcs (820751) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @02:08PM (#21522021) Journal
    Seriously? I thought real people grew out of social networking when they got out of college...

    Here were are at the obvious end conclusion. Social networking sites are not bad just for children, they are bad, period. Diary books normally come with a lock and key, social network sites come with an invitation for you to share your personal diary with the rest of the world, whether the rest of the world has any desire to read it or not. Social networking is to the Internet what reality tv is to video based entertainment. If we could get the pages judged by American Idol judges, perhaps it would be a bit better, but as long as bright neon spandex clothing continues to be sold in XXXL sizes, social networking sites will continue to plague society.

    I personally think it is a bonus feature for my next job interview that I don't have a social networking account.
  • They don't have a clue what Facebook is, and even if they did, they wouldn't use it because the UI is too confusing for them.

    That's what happens when you code PL/SQL for ten-plus years in a 4-GL IDE - your brain turns to mashed turnips.

  • Right...

    That would be so unprofessional, not to mention risky. Feelings would be hurt. It's one thing to selectively lunch or dine or smoke with or chat with a core group of co-workers. It's obvious, and natural.

    However, ranking the entire company or division or building/site would risk incurring strange or dangerous reactions. Imagine the spurned one-time fling or would-be lover spurned by company policy or by a new, hot competing love interest in our outside the company.

    I think LISTING friends for all to
  • Your Ex-CoWorkers Will Kill Facebook

    In former-Soviet Russia, your ex-coworkers kill you [guardian.co.uk]!

  • Your Ex-CoWorkers Will Kill Facebook

    No, no, no. That's not right at all.

    Bill's Ex-CoWorkers Will Fucking Kill Facebook

    Or buy it.

  • The columnist is freaking out because he/she has to go to Facebook to get their Facebook messages ... huh? This article is some kind of weird rant.
    • by hodet (620484)
      That's what it sounds like to me. People make way too big a deal about facebook. All he needs to do is cut out the email alerts or better yet stop being such a sheep and don't use the site if it is so awful to him. People are so fucking emotional about the stupidest things.
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Bearpaw (13080)

        All he needs to do is cut out the email alerts or better yet stop being such a sheep and don't use the site if it is so awful to him. People are so fucking emotional about the stupidest things.

        How stupid is it to get so fucking emotional about the stupid things people get so fucking emotional about?

        Oh wait ...
  • fix it! (Score:3, Insightful)

    by hey (83763) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @02:19PM (#21522215) Journal
    Corey makes some good points. Facebook is better than MySpace. Maybe we can take his suggestions and make something better than Facebook. Different types of relationships (ie not just bidirectional friends) would be a start.
  • It's socially awkward to refuse to add someone to your friends list

    No, it's not. Nor does clicking the easily found "deny" button automatically make somebody "a foe." Actually, come to think of it, this here Slashdot place is one of the only ones I've come across that allows both friend and foe designations.

    -- but removing someone from your friend-list is practically a declaration of war.

    No, it's not. Well, maybe if you're so unable to deny the initial friend request then this is a problem, but neither
  • These pundits get paid to talk about technology in terms of way it would've been done in the past and how ridiculous it looks now to do that, relating to the past.

    Its new technology, its here, just use it or loose it.

    As with telephone, way in back times, you didn't have to see the person you're talking to. That must've been pretty weird experience, when to talk to someone you really had to go over and see them.

    Revolutionary technology is always weird, you don't have to walk then miles and think ten days to
    • Revolutionary technology is always weird, you don't have to walk then miles and think ten days to figure it out. It even more pathetic, trying to bend yourself out of shape, trying to imagine weirdness of said technology. Its been said too, that people never really accept new ideas, rather they die and newborn get to understand that the world way it is, is just normal.

      What's so revolutionary about a web page with a database back end and some automated scripts that run to send out some notifications here and

  • and in a cool way as well (I thought about coding something like this in my spare time, otoh at the moment I have very little of that).

    ------------
    First of all every account is allowed as many profiles as they want, every profile can be completely different, and tagged with a descriptive name so you know what it's about ('work profile', 'ex's profile', etc.)

    Every profile also has a 'trust value', the higher the trust value, the more you need to trust people to show this profile.

    Every user has a trust value
  • A fellow without much credibility in my book since the dustup with Ursala LeGuin over his posting her entire one paragraph story and then not allowing comments on his fake apology to her. Putting up a comment board to comment on his stories and articles from around the web and then not allowing comments, what a concept. Also if you mention that fact on his site you get the dreaded 'removal of your vowels' censorship. Funny how the most avowed 'liberal' folks turn into little Nazis when given a tiny bit of p
  • Automatic De-list (Score:5, Insightful)

    by LionKimbro (200000) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @02:38PM (#21522511) Homepage
    It's socially awkward to refuse to add someone to your friends list -- but removing someone from your friend-list is practically a declaration of war.

    So, these services should just automatically de-list people after a year or two, unless you consciously refresh them.

    Done.
    • Hmm, I don't think you're notified if someone delists you. And most people don't supervise their friends list other than adding folk.

  • This is why I keep around 4 or 5 independent personalities online, each for a distinct forum/social network site.

    This is only one of them.
  • Those who spend all their time 'networking' and those who have friends. If you the later, then I don't know if facebook the like are even a big issue. One will use it communiicate with the larger group of friends, but how many of those will be at work? Most people pretty quickly learn not to contaminate the place one has to be at everyday with excessive personal relationships.

    For the former, it is not an issue either. Everyone is their friend, and everyone is included. It is all about earning opportu

  • 'Imagine how creepy it would be to wander into a co-worker's cubicle and discover the wall covered with tiny photos of everyone in the office, ranked by 'friend' and 'foe,' with the top eight friends elevated to a small shrine decorated with Post-It roses and hearts.'
    That would be creepy.

    But what exactly does that have to do with adding friends on Facebook?
  • Wake up call - Friend or Foe is not Facebook. It is an add on application used to rank your friends list, one of several. Personally I find the whole idea of ranking people from important to not important pretentious - so I do not install those applications.

  • 'Imagine how creepy it would be to wander into a co-worker's cubicle and discover the wall covered with tiny photos of everyone in the office'

    ZOMG! Run for the hills!!!!

    maybe my imagination is weak because that would hardly even register...
    why would i care?
  • by RiddleofSteel (819662) on Thursday November 29, 2007 @04:46PM (#21524359)
    I've already run into this issue with my Xbox360 profile. Several coworkers and I were all on each others friends list to play Gears of War against each other. Then my boss joined us which was fine. Then a month after that I get a friend request from the CEO of the company. At first I thought nothing of it, until the CEO commented on how later I was up on the 360 a few nights ago and how I was 10 minutes late the next day. Now I have two accounts, but what sucks is all my achievements, unlocked content, etc are on the original account. Also I've given up my myspace account(didn't use it much to begin with) because some stalker chick at work kept sending me friend requests and making comments about my profile and pictures. I really don't think this social networking stuff is for the better.
  • Groups... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by PhotoGuy (189467) on Friday November 30, 2007 @04:40AM (#21530105) Homepage
    I wish Facebook would add a feature that allowed grouping your friends into categories (coworkers, friends, etc.) for your own organization purposes. I used to have a bunch of former co-workers, and distant former friends on my friends list. But I live far from most of them now, never come in contact with them, and probably won't, except in rare cases. So I don't need to know that Jane painted her living room and is waiting for the hottub to be installed. It got ridiculous all the status updates for people that I really didn't interact with.

    So I pruned my list down to mainly people I am actively friends with, or with whom I keep some lines of communication open.

    It'd be nice to be able to put users into categories with different features; I don't want to see status updates for former co-workers, and so forth.

    (And on a side note, please kill Funwall. :) It's the new equivalent of mass-mailings of cutsie-pie stuff.)

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