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Google To Fund Ideas That Will Change the World 165

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the we-should-all-become-deities-the-end dept.
Peace Corps Online writes "This week, as part of their tenth birthday celebration, Google announced the launch of project ten to the 100th, a project designed to inspire and fund the development of ideas that will help to change the world. They have called on members of the public to share their ideas for solutions that will help as many people as possible in the global community, offering a $10 million prize pool to back the development of those chosen as winners. 'We know there are countless brilliant ideas that need funding and support to come to fruition,' says Bethany Poole, Project Marketing Manager for Google. 'These ideas can be big or small, technology-driven or brilliantly simple — but they need to have impact.' The project's website asks entrants to classify their ideas into one of eight categories listed as Community, Opportunity, Energy, Environment, Health, Education, Shelter and Everything Else. Members of the public have until October 20th to submit their ideas by completing a simple form and answering a few short questions about their idea."
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Google To Fund Ideas That Will Change the World

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  • First Idea (Score:5, Funny)

    by xpuppykickerx (1290760) on Friday September 26, 2008 @04:23PM (#25171761)
    a gun that shoots cookies. either at 600f/s or just gently enough to hit my mouth.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 26, 2008 @04:41PM (#25171989)

      a gun that shoots cookies. either at 600f/s or just gently enough to hit my mouth.

      Noo! that would be the ultimate weapon. Armies would drop their weapons to be shot! Children would run into war and battlefields thereby preventing the armies who refuse to give up their arms to stop shooting to not hit the children.

      No sir! Your idea is extremely dangerous and anti-American! Why peace would break out along with our waistlines!

      What next? C-130 tankers with milk?!? And then what?!? It'll escalate. You'd have others inventing pizza guns and then tankers with beer! There would be no end and our planet would degrade into obese partying!

      Someone call the cops on the parent degenerate.

    • That shit's poetic. =]
  • Who profits? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by ShadowRangerRIT (1301549) on Friday September 26, 2008 @04:29PM (#25171829)

    So who actually profits from this? Does Google sift the data and then start up in-house projects or do they run a program like the MacArthur genius grant, where the money is provided with little to no strings attached?

    Given the earlier controversy over their EULAs containing clauses to forfeit all rights to your IP, this isn't just an idle question.

    • Re:Who profits? (Score:4, Informative)

      by iamhigh (1252742) * on Friday September 26, 2008 @04:35PM (#25171901)
      Why not read the TOS before spouting stupid questions...

      Terms of service

      Google created this call for submissions to engage Google users and the global community in a discussion about how to change the world. Participants are invited to submit proposals about how best to improve our world in a variety of key areas. Users are asked to vote on their favorite proposal. The most popular ideas will be put before a panel of experts to be considered for implementation by Google.

      By participating, you agree to be bound by the Google Terms of Service (http://www.google.com/accounts/TOS [google.com]) and the Google Privacy Policy (http://www.google.com/privacypolicy.html [google.com]), both documents herein incorporated by reference, as well as the following additional terms (altogether "Terms"). If you choose to include a video, you also agree to be bound by YouTube's Terms of Use (http://www.youtube.com/t/terms [youtube.com]).

      1. Participation: Google will post instructions, restrictions and guidelines for this call for submissions on the Project 10100 website. You agree to adhere to these materials. Google reserves the right to reject your proposal or terminate your participation should you not adhere to these materials or the Terms. Google will email you if your idea is chosen as a finalist.

      2. Intellectual property rights: You warrant and represent that any content you submit is your original creation and does not infringe any third party rights, including without limitation, copyright, trademark, patent, trade secret, privacy, and publicity, and that the content is not otherwise illegal or made or submitted in violation of any contractual obligation you might have with a third party.

      As between you and Google, you retain ownership of any intellectual and industrial property rights (including moral rights) you have in and to your submission.

      As a condition of participation, you grant Google, its subsidiaries, agents and partner companies, a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, and non-exclusive license to use, reproduce, adapt, modify, publish, distribute, publicly perform, create a derivative work from, and publicly display your submission and the proposal provided therein (1) for the purposes of allowing Google, the advisory panel and users to evaluate your idea for purposes of the call for submissions, (2) in connection with advertising and promotion via communication to the public or other groups, including, but not limited to, the right to make screenshots, animations and video clips available for promotional purposes and (3) for the purposes of putting your submitted proposal into effect.

      You agree that Google has final authority regarding this call for submission and the selection of the ideas to be considered for implementation. You acknowledge that your submission might be similar to ideas submitted by other participants and/or proposals independently developed by Google, and that Google does not need to recognize your submission should your idea not be the source of the proposal or proposals ultimately implemented. You further acknowledge that even if your proposal is selected by Google, Google is not compelled to implement your proposal in its entirety, or at all. Google reserves the right in its sole discretion to incorporate your proposal or any other ideas into the project or projects finally selected for implementation

      3. Privacy: You agree that personal data you disclose as part of this call for submissions, including name, phone number, and email address, may be processed, stored, shared and otherwise used for the purposes and within the context of the call

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        I'll admit, I didn't click through the three links needed to find the ToS. Of course, it still gives very little information as to how the funding is distributed. The guarantee of IP rights is nice, if they honor it. Problem is, it's really hard to prove the origin of an idea. I can see this being a legal headache for Google, since any new work they do that happens to overlap a submitted idea will probably lead to litigation.
      • by thePig (964303)

        you grant Google a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, and non-exclusive license to use, reproduce, adapt, modify, publish, distribute, publicly perform, create a derivative work from, and publicly display for the purposes of putting your submitted proposal into effect.

        This looks rather dangerous. Since IANAL, can somebody explain whether this would mean that Google would be able to implement the idea themselves?

        • Notice this, right at the start:

          The most popular ideas will be put before a panel of experts to be considered for implementation by Google.

          Google isn't giving this money to the folks with the winning ideas. They're using the money themselves to enact your great idea.

          This is clarified by the FAQ -- once the ideas are chosen, they will start an RFP process to choose who will do the implementation (I would assume they will also have Google people involved in the implementation at various levels). You (as th

      • Why not read the TOS before spouting stupid questions...

        You must be new here.

    • From http://www.project10tothe100.com/tos.html [project10tothe100.com]

      "As between you and Google, you retain ownership of any intellectual and industrial property rights (including moral rights) you have in and to your submission."

      It would seem that the creator of the idea *may* profit.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by CyrusOmega (1261328)
        Replying to self, this is bad but I also just found this http://www.project10tothe100.com/faq.html [project10tothe100.com]...

        "Q: What do I get if my idea is chosen? A: You get good karma and the satisfaction of knowing that your idea might truly help a lot of people."

        Doesn't sound like profit is the name of the game here.
        • by JavaRob (28971)

          "Q: What do I get if my idea is chosen? A: You get good karma and the satisfaction of knowing that your idea might truly help a lot of people."

          Doesn't sound like profit is the name of the game here.

          Not for the idea submitter, no. Google may profit from the implementation of the idea -- they're handling that side of it, so this isn't anything like the MacArthur genius grant, etc -- but I think primarily in terms of image.

          Basically, they are looking to splash out some money implementing a cool philanthropic project (which costs some money but gains them cred and image), and to get the coolest possible idea they are asking outside people for suggestions as well.

          It's not evil -- in the end, the world doe

    • by oGMo (379)

      Given the earlier controversy over their EULAs containing clauses to forfeit all rights to your IP, this isn't just an idle question.

      You mean the ones they immediately fixed? Are you one of those paranoid whiners who has no problem with Microsoft but points out all the evil things that Google must be doing?

      • by KGIII (973947) *

        I don't know about you but most Microsoft fans are pretty clueless as a whole. It seems a bit ironic that you're include calling Google out on a problem or citing a historic problem with Google (that was not fixed "immediately" by any definition though I'll take "quickly" if you'd like but let's agree on the English language from here on out) as being someone who uses a Microsoft product or is somehow related to being a fan of Microsoft.

        If a Microsoft problem shows up we all scream that we know what they di

  • The site says they've got $10 million sitting ready to implement these ideas.... but the idea submitter gets zero (or even any involvement in the process). So they're basically crowdsourcing the brainstorming step, and then will do a normal quote/bid process beyond that. So they've already made a disconnect -- people with truly great ideas are going to want to 1) have something to do with seeing them happen, and 2) want to benefit personally. (Even non-profits pay good salaries!) So I don't think this m

    • by Flaggday (1373017)
      I don't think your (1) and (2) are necessarily true. If we assume there's some truth in the re-usable cliche that "____ is 1% inspiration, 99% perspiration". This contest gives a chance for someone who's got that 1% to get the 99% taken care of by others. I could just post in my blog, or on /., my great idea to help people, but if it wins the contest it's more likely to actually happen.
    • by SQLGuru (980662)

      I think you'd be surprised at how many people would offer up their "wouldn't it be cool if...." ideas. I've submitted one already that probably won't win, but I have no knowledge of how to go about getting it implemented and wouldn't ever try, but if it were implemented, I could see how someone would benefit.

      Any idea that people have that they would follow through with, sure, they'll keep it.....but if you aren't going to do anything with the idea, why not submit it and at least get credit for the idea.

      My

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by smoker2 (750216)
      "relinquish control of their intellectual property"
      It's assholes like you that prevent the world moving forward. Everything has its price in your world, even blood. Just maybe there are people out there who want better things for less fortunate people - no payment needed thanks !
    • by SnowZero (92219)

      people with truly great ideas are going to want to 1) have something to do with seeing them happen, and 2) want to benefit personally. (Even non-profits pay good salaries!) So I don't think this model provides adequate benefit to the idea owner to relinquish control of their intellectual property. Will the really good ideas come out?

      If your idea is a slam-dunk winner for profitability, or if you expect to make money on an idea, go talk to a VC firm. If you've got a good idea you should be able to get it funded. The current system already works for this kind of idea.

      What about all the ideas that could help many people, but require substantial investment and would at best break even? Outside of philanthropic efforts (such as this contest), the current system fails. VC firms won't touch something that won't turn a profit, and charitie

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by LingNoi (1066278)

      Maybe some of us aren't money grabbing assholes like you? Possibly (like Google) we want to give our ideas so that those less fortunate then us can benefit.

      You sound like the kind of guy that asks for a pay check when sending a patch to an open source project. GTFO.

  • 5 simple things (Score:1, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    1: Some renewable energy source that actually can handle dense loads 24/7. Solar can't. Nuclear really can't because contractors are too inept or corrupt to do a job right. Pretty much, fusion is the only thing we got going.

    2: Batteries (supercaps preferably) with an energy density approaching gasoline.

    3: Automatic pilot for cars so dense highways can be created to allow for the maximum density out there, so one drunk driver wrecking doesn't hamstring thousands of people.

    4: Reliable, reusable space v

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Red Flayer (890720)

      1: Some renewable energy source that actually can handle dense loads 24/7. Solar can't. Nuclear really can't because contractors are too inept or corrupt to do a job right. Pretty much, fusion is the only thing we got going.

      Dude, if you have fusion going, then wtf are you doing applying to google for some share of a 10MM grant?! You could have billions in VC funding.

      5: Tape backup that has a modern arial density, and that is inexpensive. Hard disks are fickle and fragile, and tape isn't perfect, but can st

      • Dude, if you have fusion going, then wtf are you doing applying to google for some share of a 10MM grant?! You could have billions in VC funding.

        You really missed the begging Bussard did between the time he DID have fusion going and the time he died, didn't you?

        He even begged Google. They put his talk on their web site [google.com] and didn't give him any bux.

        = = = =

        Eventually the Navy dribbled out enough money for the next set of lab work, which should have been done as of last month. Now we're waiting for the Navy t

    • 1: Some renewable energy source that actually can handle dense loads 24/7.

      SIMPLE things?!? You mean "Simple in concept but impossible in reality?" Yeah, fusion fits that bill. Another idea: the prepetual motion+ machine. Not only does it move forever, it turns a turbine to generate power. From nothing.

      Also zero-point energy. That sounds interesting. I'd be suprised if someone hadn't proven it is impossible, or a misunderstanding of some physics concept.

      Perfect solutions to energy problems probably will always be fiction.

    • by HTH NE1 (675604)

      3: Automatic pilot for cars so dense highways can be created to allow for the maximum density out there, so one drunk driver wrecking doesn't hamstring thousands of people.

      Don't drink and drive: spill and you might short out your autodriver.

    • Re:5 simple things (Score:5, Insightful)

      by techno-vampire (666512) on Friday September 26, 2008 @05:09PM (#25172269) Homepage
      Nuclear really can't because contractors are too inept or corrupt to do a job right.

      So, let's see, that means that you're simply going to dismiss the technology because you assert that the people doing the work aren't capable of doing it correctly. Do you have any proof, or are you just expressing your own anti-nuclear bias. Oh, and before I forget, fusion is a form of nuclear energy as well.

      • by Kagura (843695)
        Oh, and before I forget, fusion is a form of nuclear energy as well.

        Good luck burning coal in your power plants without involving any atom nuclei. ;)
    • by TigerNut (718742)
      I've seen some pretty high density on the highway already... we don't need more of that.
    • by zogger (617870)

      Solar power is the only form of practical fusion power we have now, it is likely to be the only form of practical fusion power for the next several decades at least, and it scales from small dedicated solar powered devices to multiple megawatt sized solar farms. As for it being 24/7 we don't need that so much, the grid itself doesn't run peak capacity 24/7. We typically get larger demands during the heat (and sunshine) of mid day, when solar really rocks. As an adjunct to what we have now, a few billion pan

    • "Some renewable energy source that actually can handle dense loads 24/7. Solar can't. "

      Wrong, look into solar thermal. They store the super heated liquid so it can spin the turbines all night. In fact, there is talk of it being able to be a base load.

      "Nuclear really can't because contractors are too inept or corrupt to do a job right. Pretty much, fusion is the only thing we got going."
      I can't even imagine where you get this idea.
      Also, look into the IFR.

  • 10. What one sentence best describes your idea? (maximum 150 characters)

    Build a complete set of social and computer networking tools that can be distributed on/via USB Sticks.

    ---
    11. Describe your idea in more depth. (maximum 300 words)

    CBBS opened a new vista of social networking in 1978, which lead to Fidonet, to parallel UUCP, etc.
    Build a set of tools which allow the modern update to it, with sneakernet as the backbone.

    This could be used by families to share photos. Researchers with huge data sets on the l

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 26, 2008 @04:50PM (#25172067)

      How ironic, here was my entry

      10. What one sentence best describes your idea? (maximum 150 characters)

      Beer Sandwiches.

      ---
      11. Describe your idea in more depth. (maximum 300 words)

      Ever since that first man drunk a fly infested bucket of rancid water and fermenting honey, alcohol has been a mainstay of society. If we were able to fuse the brilliance of beer with the genius of the sandwich, the possibilities would be endless!

      ---
      12. What problem or issue does your idea address? (maximum 150 words)

      Beer is an aqueous solution which is prone to spilling. A "sippy cup" would address the problem, but will leave the user humiliated. A beer sandwich is the most logical solution

      ---
      13. If your idea were to become a reality, who would benefit the most and how? (maximum 150 words)

      Most importantly, people who drink and drive. You see, a beer sandwich is a food, and there are no laws against "eating and driving". It would take stress off of the courts and put less innocent people behind bars.

      ---
      14. What are the initial steps required to get this idea off the ground? (maximum 150 words)

      Someone needs to cross beer and sandwiches. Is it really that hard? You're freaking google!

      ---
      15. Describe the optimal outcome should your idea be selected and successfully implemented. How would you measure it? (maximum 150 words)

      Everyone around the world gets to enjoy beer sandwiches!

  • Wrong name? (Score:3, Funny)

    by complexmath (449417) on Friday September 26, 2008 @04:38PM (#25171939)

    The prize pool is only ten to the 6th.

  • take the warning labels off everything, the stupid people will die, this will have the following effects: 1 reduce global population. 2 increase the global IQ 3reduce the amount of really stupid slashdot stories.
  • by acid06 (917409) on Friday September 26, 2008 @04:53PM (#25172085)

    Google isn't asking for profitable ideas or anything like that.

    Sure, some of them could end up being profitable, but that's not the point. They want to invest in nice ideas which could improve the life quality of people. From the video, you can clearly see they're interested in ideas that could, for instance, ease the burden put on poor people in countries like Africa. You can hardly profit from that.

    This is called philanthropy. And it's amazing how people from the US find this so absurd.
    Sometimes, there really isn't a catch.

    • Google isn't asking for profitable ideas or anything like that. Sure, some of them could end up being profitable, but that's not the point. They want to invest in nice ideas which could improve the life quality of people. From the video, you can clearly see they're interested in ideas that could, for instance, ease the burden put on poor people in countries like Africa. You can hardly profit from that. This is called philanthropy. And it's amazing how people from the US find this so absurd. Sometimes, the

    • Sometimes, there really isn't a catch.

      Just like its ok to blindly accept a EULA because the company certainly only has your best interest in mind. Call me jaded, but I have see one too many "no strings attached" offers turn sour

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Garse Janacek (554329)

      ideas that could, for instance, ease the burden put on poor people in countries like Africa.

      Or improve the quality of education in countries like the US...

    • From the video, you can clearly see they're interested in ideas that could, for instance, ease the burden put on poor people in countries like Africa.

      1) What they are clearly showing us, is not necessarily the big picture. In any case, I hope that Google profits from this, it is a company and in order to do more projects like this it needs to profit.

      2) Africa is not a country.

    • by Chysn (898420)

      > Sometimes, there really isn't a catch.

      You think this statement is going to make you look all socially-conscious, but I can see right through your little angle.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Term limits for all Congresspersons.

    That by itself should result in the solution of a whole host of problems.

    • one better (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Term limits for all governmental employees, every single one, plus no pensions. Make all of government be forced to compete and live in the real world eventually and you'll see a lot less bullshit out of government.

  • Education (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mikethicke (191964) on Friday September 26, 2008 @04:55PM (#25172107)

    Use Google's infrastructure and clout to combat censorship and surveillance of dissidents by oppressive regimes.

  • 10. What one sentence best describes your idea? (maximum 150 characters)

    Artificial sentience.

    11. Describe your idea in more depth. (maximum 300 words)

    Beyond artificial intelligence, this project aims to create a sentient being. Using recent advancements such as ultra-fast processors, massive storage capacities and object-oriented coding, this being would be a conglomerate of interacting objects, each representing an aspect of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. Put simply, it would be your standard AI, w
    • by Plutonite (999141)

      Not bad, but I (and others, see numenta) are working on that already in far more realizable terms, and we don't really need Google Inc's money for anything. Except we need beer. And hardware. And hookers.

      And blackjack.

  • I submitted my idea, open source voting. I know theres a foundation out there already, but I was hoping if Google took the lead they could actually make it a reality. Heck, maybe they will bring about a direct democracy system where all issues are first released to public for voting (directly) then if there are not enough public votes it falls into a representative body of voters (congress). Would be cool if they made the server side technology system to supplement something like that and it actually DID im
  • by sane? (179855)

    By imposing the terms Google has, they have ensured that only a small subset of ideas will only ever be submitted to them. No commercially viable ideas can be proposed, and their instance that they can ignore the creator means they will only get what nobody really cares about.

    Google should get a clue, up the funding by an order of magnitude, ensure the individual benefits ($1m minimum) AND maintains control and then they might get something worthwhile. If you have a solution to the energy crisis you will no

  • by owlnation (858981) on Friday September 26, 2008 @05:41PM (#25172523)
    Here's a great idea that would change the world...

    Search.

    You know, that works really, really well.

    I know, it's a crazy idea and I bet no-one at Google has thought of it.
  • A math program that teaches anyone math regardless of skill level.
  • by PPH (736903)
    Until I've got my flying car, there's not really any point in getting side tracked with something else.
  • We can do it on the cheap in Cali where you don't have to pay overtime!

  • ... doing no corporate evil?

  • Shoot 90% of lawyers, put politicians to work on farms, appoint intelligent people who despise power to positions of leadership.
  • by vkg (158234) on Friday September 26, 2008 @06:40PM (#25173003) Homepage

    May those who help most win so they say.

    I made three entries - the hexayurt, the infrastructure package, and the low cost medical care.

    The Hexayurt
    The hexayurt is a reasonably well tested next generation disaster relief shelter built on free/open source principles and industrial supply chains. It comes from work done at the Rocky Mountain Institute. The basic idea is to take 12 standard 4âx8â industrial panels, cut six in half diagonally and fasten them into a cone (see the site for pictures) and use six whole panels for the walls, giving a durable shelter of 166 square feet, big enough for 5 people at UN standards. These shelters will survive 80 mph winds easily.

    The emphasis on using standard industrial materials is the key. Nobody can afford to carry extensive stocks of emergency housing for disasters in the developing world, which often displace millions of people. Airfreighting tents is expensive and inefficient, and tents are lousy shelter for long term use, which is all-too-frequently how they are deployed. The Hexayurt idea is that industrial cities near regular disaster zones (Bangaladesh, strife-torn areas of Africa, the hurricane belt) take their existing industrial infrastructure and add a few simple new skills so that before or after a disaster they can mass produce a simple, long-life shelter for affected populations. This is a step towards disaster relief self-sufficiency at a regional level, so that these areas begin to be able to cope without being so reliant on patchy and poorly-funded international relief effots.

    The Hexayurt concept has been tested by US DOD, and is an integral part of the STAR-TIDES program. American Red Cross and Netherlands Red Cross both think it is a great idea and have supported its development, and AMURT is considering the system. All of this has been done by a persistent self-funded open source development effort.

    http://hexayurt.com/ [hexayurt.com]

    The Hexayurt Infrastructure Package
    The hexayurt is a free/open disaster relief shelter which has its own entry. However, a shelter alone is not enough to really help people after a disaster. If you have 100,000 perfectly good shelters in a field, the next problem you face is water and sanitation: without some deployed solution, people will get sick and die.

    There are lots of appropriate technology solutions to sanitation, cooking without wasting wood or generating toxic smoke, purifying water to drink. All of them are under-funded, under-tested, and under-adopted. Millions to tens of millions die every year because this âoeappropriate technology infrastructureâ is not being properly funded, and the result is needless loss of life.

    The key is to understand that credible candidate technologies exist to provide all the same basic essential services that people enjoy in the developed world on a budget of maybe $200. Furthermore, the services can be provided house-by-house. For example, rainwater is collected on your roof, then purified using a biosand filter to give you safe drinking water, rather than having a water purification factory down the road and pipes. These systems are basic, and some need work, but some combination of SODIS, solar water pasteurization, thermophilic composting toilets, sulabh toilets, solar cookers, rocket stoves, gasification stoves, biosand filters, microsolar, microwind and microhydro will provide all the basic essential services of life in nearly any climate anywhere in the world. What hasnâ(TM)t been done is a global systematic program of testing each of these individual technologies in each region of the world, making local adaptations, cleaning up and publishing the designs, making training videos, running educational courses, and looking for chances to integrated, combine and synthesize systems into whole packages which are proven to provide all essential services in the field. This is our proposal.

  • ...in marketing. Make something difficult to understand to get people interested, put a lot of words around it. Doesn't matter what you're doing, the aim is to get people intrigued as to what the fuck you're on about.

    Why don't you just fucking fund the projects already and quit with the sleight of hand and weasel words.

    To this day the only software Google have put out that I've found better than the competition is their search engine. I'm sure there are other niche products but I hate Chrome, can't stand Pi

  • These are worthy of mention...

    The Aquanator captures power for underwater currents.

    http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/09/26/1096137100758.html?oneclick=true [smh.com.au]

    The Florida current has 30 times the flow of all rivers
    of the World.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_stream#Possible_renewable_power_source [wikipedia.org]

    The Antarctic current has 135 times the flow of all the
    rivers of the world.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antarctic_Circumpolar_Current [wikipedia.org]

    There are a lot of other underwater currents around the world.

    This next idea has b

  • by ynotds (318243) on Friday September 26, 2008 @08:53PM (#25174077) Homepage Journal

    Two of their five "criteria" do not sit well together:

    • Attainability: Can this idea be implemented within a year or two?
    • Longevity: How long will the idea's impact last?

    The rapid implementation requirement kills anything I would want to bring to the table, that is stuff we haven't been able to fix in a generation though the need has been increasingly evident because it requires a more patient approach than markets will tolerate (even while they burn googillions in retirement savings without a thought that we might like some priority to investments which at least try to provide a "better" world we might retire into.)

  • by gringer (252588) on Friday September 26, 2008 @09:06PM (#25174145)

    This reminds me of Microsoft's Competition:

    http://www.microsoft.com/nz/imaginecup09/about.aspx [microsoft.com]

    In 2009, the Imagine Cup challenges the world's most talented students to "Imagine a world where technology helps solve the toughest problems facing us today."

    I find the goal a bit too broad for a challenging competition, there are also a few requirements, some of which I find a bit odd:

    • Use of a Mobile device
    • Implementation or consumption of a XML Web Service
    • .NET Framework 2.0 or later;
    • Visual Studio family (Express, Standard, Professional, or Team System) for development
  • ... I doubt they will choose the best ideas. There are a tonne of great ideas with no voice to the ones who are capable of implementing them.

    I hope for the best, but I'm a bit skeptical of this.

  • It takes upwards of 20 times that much for a regional roll-out within the US, and they expect 10 mil to cover global development of this idea?

    I doubt I could even market a simple molded plastic widget worldwide for 10 million.

  • Unfortunately their form appears unable to accept perfectly legit email addresses!

    The problem is either ".co.uk" is not accepted, or possibly that I have my own domain name.

    Either way, it does not accept "anne@thwacks.co,uk" (or near equivalents) as an email address. Theyn will have to do better than that if they want to save the world!

  • That would be a great thing for millions of people right there. Instead of a website which essentially says 'go away' - faqs faqs faqs everywhere, but never a human to see.

    And they should redesign google groups so that those of us who no longer have perfect kid vision can actually see whats going on.

"Don't worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you'll have to ram them down people's throats." -- Howard Aiken

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