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Sleep Mailing 195

Posted by samzenpus
from the better-than-drunk-dialing dept.
Doctors have reported the first case of someone using the internet while asleep, when a sleeping woman sent emails to people asking them over for drinks and caviar. The 44-year-old woman found out what she had done after a would be guest phoned her about it the next day. While asleep the woman turned on her computer, logged on by typing her username and password then composed and sent three emails. Each mail was in a random mix of upper and lower cases, unformatted and written in strange language. One read: "Come tomorrow and sort this hell hole out. Dinner and drinks, 4.pm,. Bring wine and caviar only." Another said simply, "What the......." If I had known that researchers were interested in unformatted, rambling email I would have let them read my inbox. They could start a whole new school of medicine.

*

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Sleep Mailing

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  • Idle? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Kagura (843695) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:16PM (#26125553)
    Wow. They even used a pic like Idle. Why is this filtering into my regular slashdot now?
    • by corsec67 (627446)

      Because /. has jumped the shark?

    • Re:Idle? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by eln (21727) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:25PM (#26125667) Homepage

      It's all part of Slashdot's master plan to become just another digg/fark clone.

      Think about it: First they create the Politics section to get people used to the idea that they aren't just "News for Nerds" anymore, then they replace their perfectly good interface with a godawful Web 2.0 mess. Then, they introduce the "Idle" section for so-called "humorous" links (man, I was just thinking to myself: there just aren't enough sites out there dedicated to posting "funny" news stories). Now, content that should be in Idle starts bleeding out into other sections.

      Next steps: Creation of "Boobies" tag, site name change to "Rob Malda's Slashdot.org", removal of "Boobies" tag in effort to become a more "serious" funny links aggregator. I can hardly wait.

      • Re:Idle? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Kagura (843695) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:34PM (#26125801)

        replace their perfectly good interface with a godawful Web 2.0 mess.

        I didn't mind any changes they made in the least, except for the silly changes to the user page! Now it takes two clicks and page loads in between to get to my comment page, whereas before it was only one simple click from the main page. This is the only change I've minded, and I mind considerably.

        First they came for my easy-to-read Slashdot color scheme, but I did not speak out...

        • Re:Idle? (Score:5, Insightful)

          by eln (21727) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:54PM (#26126027) Homepage

          I'm with you 100% on the user page. What we have now is uglier and provides less information than the old one. The only reason I go to my own user page is to see if anyone has replied to my comments, and now I have to navigate two (slower) pages to do it. I don't understand what they were thinking on that one. There seems to be no benefit at all to the new page.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by PCM2 (4486)

            Thirded. I don't even understand what the new user page is trying to achieve. Slashdot is the only site I know that keeps the same fugly color scheme and design but expends extra effort to mess up the UI on a regular basis. If I could roll back to the design from 2000, I would.

            • Re:Idle? (Score:5, Funny)

              by Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) on Monday December 15, 2008 @07:50PM (#26126663) Journal
              Yeah, I'm seriously considering creating a mashup website that just interfaces with slashdot, and then cleans up the interface. Idle will not exist at all. Attempting to manipulate the url to goto idle, will result in the user's death, or possibly a just redirect them to digg, which ever is not considered a felony in more places.
              • by corbettw (214229)

                Careful, I think redirecting to digg is considered a crime against humanity in some jurisdictions.

          • Re:Idle? (Score:5, Insightful)

            by freeweed (309734) on Monday December 15, 2008 @10:47PM (#26128211)

            Seriously folks, this is getting to the point of horseshit. I have yet to hear anyone actually DEFEND these changes; the best comes down to "it's not the end of the world". Akin to "hey, modern Windows is good, it doesn't crash very often anymore". ie: a backhanded compliment.

            Time for a new meme. I'm fucking sick of the trashing of Slashdot, and the user page was the last straw. Let's raise this issue on every single story thread. There ain't enough compliant mods to handle us, and we always talk about what the Slash community could do with its numbers...

            As this clearly isn't Rob et al's decision, let's fight fire with fire. Trash this site folks, because the site operators are doing it anyway. Let's make sure every single story has pointless offtopic threads like this until something fucking changes.

            Honestly, for a while I thought I was the only one. I'm not in the "Slash has gone downhill re: comment quality crowd", but for fuck's sake - STOP TURNING THIS INTO FARK.

            • Seriously folks, this is getting to the point of horseshit. I have yet to hear anyone actually DEFEND these changes;

              Seriously folks, this is so fucking annoying. I've never heard anyone actually DEFEND getting kicked repeatedly in the nuts and punched in the face. WTF is wrong with all of you. Someone PLEASE stand up and pretend to like idle, or I'll have to use words like horseshit which freaks out my spell-checker because it's not a real word like fuck. (It suggests 'horses hit' by the way.)

        • by aaarrrgggh (9205)

          While the user page is the worst, I really hate the lack of a tree style expansion like we had with the slashdotter extensions in FF

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        You'll get over it.

        Warmest regards,

        Jeff Bates

      • Re:Idle? (Score:5, Funny)

        by MRe_nl (306212) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:58PM (#26126071)

        Come in tomorrow and sort this godawful Web 2.0 hell hole out.
        Bring wine and caviar only.

        Sincerly yours
        Cmdr. Taco

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by Jesus_666 (702802)
          Wine32 or wine64? And which size Caviar? Caviar Green, Black, Blue, RE3...?

          Come on man, this is a tech website. Or at least it used to be. You could at least sleep-post a bit more precisely.
      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        You need to get out of your parents basement, nerd. If you ever get a life you will learn that there is more to life then programming and science stories. I for one would be happy to see a more normal audience around here, and this kind of story helps to draw these people in.

      • Re:Idle? (Score:5, Informative)

        by Culture20 (968837) on Monday December 15, 2008 @07:16PM (#26126271)
        You might have blocked out idle, so you might not know that the bleed has gone both ways. There have been serious science stories that some editor decided "Hmm, that sounds funny" and put into the idle section.
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        Explain how the present interface is a "godawful Web 2.0 mess."
        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by Schemat1c (464768)

          Explain how the present interface is a "godawful Web 2.0 mess."

          You have eyes don't you?

          • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

            by lgw (121541)

            I don't think IE users get the Godawful Web 2.0 Interface(tm). At least, I've never seen it (though the change to the comments page sucks goatse).

      • Re:Idle? (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Jesus_666 (702802) on Monday December 15, 2008 @08:40PM (#26127157)
        As for this story: With more background links (such as a discussion in a medical journal) this would be a bona fide geeky news story. While it's been knwn for a while that people can act in their sleep (even to the point of semi-intelligent conversation), something as abstract as writing mails is new.

        I think sleep and sleep disorders are a very interesting and discussion-worthy subject (even though I can't offer any medical/biological insight, I'd be interested in such posts from others with more knowledge than me). The story is just not presented that well.

        So in essence my verdict is "Where's the beef?" and not "/. is the wrong place to post something like that".
        • by cp.tar (871488)

          As for this story: With more background links (such as a discussion in a medical journal) this would be a bona fide geeky news story. While it's been knwn for a while that people can act in their sleep (even to the point of semi-intelligent conversation), something as abstract as writing mails is new.

          While I agree writing mails is new, even intelligent conversation is possible while sleeping. As long as you're not dreaming.
          In my experience, talking while dreaming causes dreams to spill over, and the resulting sentences become nonsensical. Talking in between dreams seems to result in quite normal conversation; the only problem is that I never seem to remember it.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by Jesus_666 (702802)
            I know. My brother used to do this occasionally, although only for short conversations á la: "Wake up, it's time for lunch." - "Yeah, I'll be there in five minutes." Of course he would then go back to seep and not even remember I ever woke him up. Quite annoying until it stopped at some point.
            • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

              by cp.tar (871488)

              I know. My brother used to do this occasionally, although only for short conversations á la: "Wake up, it's time for lunch." - "Yeah, I'll be there in five minutes." Of course he would then go back to seep and not even remember I ever woke him up. Quite annoying until it stopped at some point.

              Oh, I've been told I'd keep up a fairly lengthy conversation. My grandmother claimed my mother used to talk to her like that; they would discuss chores and whatnot while my mother was asleep, and she wouldn't even know the difference. Even when she tried to make sure my mother was awake by making her repeat everything, it still didn't work - she would repeat everything while asleep.

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by amalyn (1405799)
          I have narcolepsy, which might preclude me from any normal research into sleep-Internet use.

          I write email and forum posts in my sleep on a semi-recurring basis [the more stressed out I am and physically exhausted, the more often it occurs].

          It is really interesting [and kind of terrifying, the "oh dear, what did I write this time, and who to?" sinking feeling of realization when I wake up to different browser page open than expected] to see the fluidity of the words I write. More free-flowing, less cho
    • Re:Idle? (Score:5, Funny)

      by ChromeAeonium (1026952) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:34PM (#26125797)

      Why is this filtering into my regular slashdot now?

      The second case of someone using the internet while asleep?

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Chad Birch (1222564)
      samzenpus has done this multiple times, he seems to be pretty bad at posting stuff into the correct section. Either that or (like other people have suggested) it's part of a plot to test us and see if we'll put up with this site slowly turning into digg.

      I know I won't hang around when that happens.
    • Re:Idle? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by owlnation (858981) on Monday December 15, 2008 @07:13PM (#26126245)
      The best thing to do is not comment on this kind of article -- other than to register protest.

      I note the really lame article "The Year of 2008 In Cybercrime" from Networkworld got only 42 comments -- many of which were complaints about the low quality of Networkworld. That's the way to show the editors the failure of their new direction and their sell-out.

      The slow idle-creep has to stop. If they want to have a Digg-type site then let them create a new site altogether. Call it Idle and keep it off Slashdot. The audience for Idle is NOT the same as Slashdot. At this rate someone will have to create a new site to cater for the core Slashdot audience, because it seems that Taco and the boys have stopped caring about their regular readers.
      • by mqduck (232646)

        I don't get it. What's wrong with this story? It's interesting. Why are people complaining about it so much?

        Is anything without hard science or with a picture now unacceptable to the anti-Idleistas?

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Referring to the OP, it is worth noting that Gmail has a Beer goggles plugin available. It should prevent this, unless you do 3rd grade math in your sleep. -ellie
  • Yah right (Score:5, Funny)

    by eln (21727) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:17PM (#26125571) Homepage

    Look lady, I show up to your house with wine and caviar and you make up some lame excuse about "sleep emailing". If you didn't want the second date, you should have just said so! I'm a Slashdotter, I'm used to rejection, there's no need to lead me on and come up with lame excuses at the last minute.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by msu320 (1084789)

      Look lady, I show up to your house with wine and caviar and you make up some lame excuse about "sleep emailing". If you didn't want the second date, you should have just said so! I'm a Slashdotter, I'm used to rejection, there's no need to lead me on and come up with lame excuses at the last minute.

      Your a self admitted slashdotter. You were Doomed the moment she opened her eyes!

    • by CarpetShark (865376) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:45PM (#26125915)

      Actually, she's not lying to you. What many slashdotters fail to realise is that their boring effect on women also spreads back in time. So not only can we put women to sleep; we can put them to sleep right back to when they first contacted us.

  • not uncommon (Score:3, Insightful)

    by ILuvRamen (1026668) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:18PM (#26125591)
    Now that there's ambien and those other zombie drugs, people are sleep driving, jogging, typing, cooking, and eating. I wish I was making those up but every single one has reportedly happened. Maybe drugs that screw with your brain that much that yo go into a semi-conscious zombie haze should be taken off the market. I'm not saying this lady necessarily took them, but that sort of thing has been known to happen on some sleep aids.
    • Re:not uncommon (Score:4, Interesting)

      by badasscat (563442) <basscadet75@yahoo.STRAWcom minus berry> on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:24PM (#26125651)

      Now that there's ambien and those other zombie drugs, people are sleep driving, jogging, typing, cooking, and eating.

      Well I hate to tell you this but those things were all reported before sleep aids even existed.

      I'm not saying this lady necessarily took them, but that sort of thing has been known to happen on some sleep aids.

      I think it's more likely that it happens to people taking sleep aids because they are overtired to begin with... which is why they're taking sleep aids.

      In other words, correlation != causality.

      Now, as for this, I found the summary both interesting and hilarious. I would be both freaked out and amused if I woke to find the stream of my subconscious having been typed out into a series of emails. Of course, I'd put a lock on my computer that would require complex thought to unlock shortly after...

      • Re:not uncommon (Score:4, Interesting)

        by Architect_sasyr (938685) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:51PM (#26125985)

        Of course, I'd put a lock on my computer that would require complex thought to unlock shortly after...

        It doesn't help. It takes three rather complex passwords and a USB fob to unlock my computer, and yet every now and then I wake up in the morning to find a bucket load of C on the screen and no idea how it got there.

        What scares me is that "doctors" have "just" discovered this - when I'm sure hundreds (if not thousands) of slashdotters can claim to have done it years ago.

        • by ibbie (647332)

          It takes three rather complex passwords and a USB fob to unlock my computer, and yet every now and then I wake up in the morning to find a bucket load of C on the screen and no idea how it got there.

          I've done that a time or two, myself, though I only need two complex passwords (no USB fob). And let me tell you something I've learned: if you still make your deadlines, and the code passes your test suite, don't knock it. It may be that your inner muse is a night owl, but it might also have a temper.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        Gmail's "Mail Goggles" [blogspot.com] feature is starting to sound more and more useful...
    • by TheLostSamurai (1051736) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:55PM (#26126039)
      I used to take Ambien, but was lucky enough to not have any of those things happen to me while I was sleeping. I did however suffer another side effect, Sexsomnia [wikipedia.org]. Not a bad way to wake up, having sex with someone, but after a few times my girlfriend just starting slapping me in the face to wake me up.

      Also, none of my friends seemed to want to go camping with me.
    • by glitch23 (557124)

      Now that there's ambien and those other zombie drugs, people are sleep driving, jogging, typing, cooking, and eating. I wish I was making those up but every single one has reportedly happened. Maybe drugs that screw with your brain that much that yo go into a semi-conscious zombie haze should be taken off the market. I'm not saying this lady necessarily took them, but that sort of thing has been known to happen on some sleep aids.

      Somehow when those activities are being performed by people asleep they are being done just as well when the person is awake. The real problem comes when people are doing those activitites and then fall asleep. Usually when the order of activities is like that is when people stop driving on the road, stop jogging on the sidewalk, start cooking without potholders; that's when major accidents can happen. That is also a sign of sleep deprivation if it occurs for just a few seconds and if the person doesn't kno

  • by puto (533470) <theflatline@yahoo.com> on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:19PM (#26125601) Homepage
    Actually,

    Many people take sleeping pills, pain pills, mix them with booze. And these all cloud or fog the memory, and bring out bizarre behavior.

    I went through a period of sleeplessness and my doctor gave me a Ambien(a hypnotic) to put me down at night.

    However, having spend a better part of my teens and 20s "experimenting" was able to evidently ride the drug out and function. I just did not remember it. My girlfriend has stories of me cooking dinner, calling my parents, and moving around the house very slowly.

    I am going with she was high.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Canie (652059)

      Ambien is definitely a likely culprit.

      I took it for a time and one night I emailed to a friend after taking it but before I went to bed. I had no recollection of it afterward. A couple of days later I wrote essentially the same thing to my friend, totally confusing her. That's how I found out about the first message.

      It also caused horrible, screaming nightmares that freaked out spouse and our 3 dogs.

      I adhere to what I've read elsewhere: If you're gonna take the stuff, take it immediately before going to bed

    • Many people take sleeping pills, pain pills, mix them with booze.

      Straight up, or on the rocks?

      And these all cloud or fog the memory, and bring out bizarre behavior.

      ... working for a few months on a Blagojevich'ed project does that to me, too.

      I went through a period of sleeplessness and my doctor gave me a Ambien(a hypnotic) to put me down at night.

      Well, either your doctor is a saint, or a sadist, when we put our dog down, she never got up again.

      My girlfriend has stories of me cooking dinner, calling my parents, and moving around the house very slowly.

      Hey, great for your girlfriend ("He finally cooked dinner for me!"). Great for your parents ("He called us again!"). And if you were moving around very slowly, you probably didn't wake up with any bruises, from any events that you don't remember to have occurred.

      Please keep it quiet, or my girlfrien

    • That was my first thought as well. I know several people who took Ambien and would wake up in the middle of the night and do very odd things, such as eat an entire pie from the fridge, or go ride on the exercise bicycle, start cleaning with the vacuum cleaner ("Um, mom? It's 3AM"), and go back to sleep with little memory of the event.

      Some of them even sent emails.

      These were doctors and nurses who often work the late shift at work.

      Ambien makes you sleep, but apparently you don't sleep well.

    • by Haoie (1277294)

      Any kind of drug that interferes with natural sleep [either preventing or aiding] can lead to some weird, weird side effects.

      But granted, this is some extreme case.

    • My wife took those things at one time. She has done and said some strange things she completely doesn't remember. At one point she took my journal (not a particularly private one, just something I frequently write things in) and wrote me a piece of haunting, non-rhyming poetry about our relationship. The handwriting veers off and down to the right, but then lines back up on a new line on the left, and the words are both lucid and completely different from her usual style. She swore she didn't remember d

    • by mqduck (232646)

      Many people take sleeping pills, pain pills, mix them with booze. And these all cloud or fog the memory, and bring out bizarre behavior.

      I'm sorry, but I don't know where you get your information. It may be true about specifically alcohol, but it's not an accurate blanket statement about the other two categories. Opiates, for instances, which count as both sleeping pills and pain killers, have no effect on memory or behavior (unless you count the change in behavior resulting from the change in mood and degree of consciousness).

  • by rolfwind (528248) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:19PM (#26125607)

    Recently, a guy sleepwalked to death from his hotel room balcony:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/3727373/Briton-sleepwalks-to-his-death-off-hotel-balcony.html [telegraph.co.uk]

    and another guy was acquitted of rape because of sleepwalking:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1085927/How-man-raped-cleared-sleepwalking.html [dailymail.co.uk]

  • by deft (253558) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:20PM (#26125611) Homepage

    Yeah, I see the solution so clearly now, Was trying to solve this riddle for years.

    'Cheating on your husband' is to 'virgin birth'
    as 'drunken emailing' is to 'sleep mailing'.

    SOLVED!

  • Oblig. (Score:5, Funny)

    by robinsonne (952701) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:22PM (#26125633)
  • She was either SLEEPY and doesn't remember well, or she was drinking alcohol and thought it would be cute to show friends how drunk she was (later regretting it).
    • Re:Not buying it (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Cochonou (576531) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:30PM (#26125733) Homepage
      You know, you can talk to sleepwalkers, and they will answer you. Sleepwalkers can also handwrite. Why wouldn't they be able to type in an e-mail ?
      A widely reported behaviour of sleepwalkers is to redo in their sleep movements and actions they are very used to, like dressing up. Typing in an URL and a password might be such a repetitive action. Of course, you may also be right. But it doesn't seem that far-fetched to me.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        Typing in an URL and a password might be such a repetitive action.

        This is true. For 'lower security' passwords that I don't change often (yet are sufficiently complex), I often can't remember exactly what the password is if I have to tell it to someone else, I have to type it.

  • Missing something? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by dexmachina (1341273) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:25PM (#26125671)
    From the summary and TFA, it sounds like she found out emails that she didn't recall writing had been sent from her computer, so she went to a doctor and they concluded she was sleep walking. No where does it say anything about observational studies being conducted, or anything that suggests anyone actually saw her do this. So...why exactly was the possibility of her account being hacked/pranked by a friend ruled out?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by penguinbrat (711309)

      I can see some hacker out there laughing his off at this - for his new fangled virus randomly puts together jargon'ed sentences, and sends out emails (along with his virus) from the address book, and we intelligently come up with "Sleep Mailing"...

    • Even your hypothesis is overly complicated. There's a human behavior that explains every single feature of the story and is very common in humans. It's called 'lying'.
  • by Joe the Lesser (533425) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:25PM (#26125673) Homepage Journal

    iN SovIET RUsia, U must BE New OVERlordS, PROFit1!

  • Every once in awhile I review my outgoing box, mostly to make sure I haven't made some commitment and then forgotten about it... But after reading this, I'll be checking my outbox more often, and more carefully.

  • by syousef (465911) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:31PM (#26125747) Journal

    A few years ago in my mid 20s I was diagnosed with Sleep Apnea. I knew I wasn't well. I felt tired all the time, wasn't as sharp as I was because of the tiredness, was falling asleep at work even after weeks of early nights and was getting headaches. It even got to the point where I'd occasionally hallucinate or experience sleep paralysis. The kicker was falling asleep at my desk and in meetings at worked. I had to fix it or my life would very quickly end up in the toilet. It took weeks to work it out because doctors were doing blood tests etc. Once I video taped myself sleeping I knew exactly what it was and I didn't need a medical degree.

    That video was one of the most revolting things I'd ever seen, and to this day thinking of it literally makes me cringe. I looked like some sort of snorting pig. I would stop breathing for between one and two minutes, then take the most loud awful pig like snorting deep breath, take a couple more shallow breaths, then stop breathing for a minute or two again. I'd do this for the length of the video. It turns out no one who had heard me snore wanted to bring it up out of politeness. I think they assumed I knew. On the other hand I had NO idea. I didn't think it was possible to do that in your sleep without knowing, but not only was it possible, it had been going on for months (or possibly even years) before I worked out what was happening.

    Now I'm on a CPAP machine at night which opens up my airways so I don't stop breathing. I hate the damn thing - being hooked up to a mask blowing air into your nose just sucks badly - but just a couple of nights without it and the headaches return and I start feeling tired again. The change when I went on the CPAP was instant - mornings I felt so fresh and awake that it was surreal. I'd rather be dependant on a damn machine than constantly fall asleep, lose my job, walk around like a zombie moron, behave inappropriately or sluggishly because I'm half asleep, be unable to drive, and ultimately die of blood pressure related illness. I don't think I'd be alive today without it.

    Anyway the point is this experience has shattered any illusion of knowing what happens when I'm asleep.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by puto (533470)
      Was your apnea due to you being overweight?

      I used to work in a sleep center and all of our apnea patients had at least an extra 30 lbs on them, I would say only about %.0005 were thin.

      I would reccomend that if you are carrying around some extra lbs, to ditch them, get some exercise, and you will not nead the machine.

      Weight, apnea, sedentary job, especially being as young as you are is not a healthy way to be.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by bonehead (6382)

        I have sleep apnea. I'm also very thin. The doctors are always riding my ass to GAIN some weight.

        But, yes, you're right. Being overweight is one of the major causes. It's just not the only one.

        • by puto (533470)
          Have you thought about the surgery?

          It works wonders for most.
          • by syousef (465911)

            Surgery actually doesn't usually work. Success rate is abysmal over the medium term, and all the varied types of surgery are described as very painful. Not to mention the cost and risk of complication.

            Surgery is a wonderful life saving technology but it should never be your first resort unless other options are ineffective.

          • by bonehead (6382)

            Yeah, I have thought about it. In fact, I'm still thinking about it.

            I have some anesthesia issues that make surgery *slightly* more dangerous for me than for most people, but with a good doctor in charge, that's a manageable risk. And, my apnea is fairly mild, compared to what I've heard that other people are going through. It doesn't disable me, it just means I need a good 14 to 16 hours of sleep to actually wake up feeling refreshed.

            It's inconvenient and unpleasant, but I'm still on the fence as to whe

      • by syousef (465911)

        Yes, I'm overweight. I've been overweight my whole life though and only developed sleep apnea in the last six or seven years. My sleep specialist does recommend I lose weight but after examining my airways doesn't think I'll be CPAP free even after the weight loss.

        In any case I find excercise difficult as I also have a bad ankle due partly to arthritis and partly to an injury I sustained ice skating in my teens. Ironic for a guy like me that's never enjoyed sports much. (The ankle specialists I've seen say

        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward

          there are two ways to lose weight:
          1. exercise more
          2. eat less

          while you may have trouble with (1) due to your physical injuries, there's no reason you can't do (2).

          and, while this is somewhat beside the point, there are quite a few non-impact exercises you could do even with a shot ankle. look it up.

          seriously, if you don't want to die younger than you have to, can the excuses and do it.

          • by lgw (121541)

            Changing *what* you eat to eliminate junk food is a great way to lose weight.

            Once you've done that, eating less (without excercise) is a crappy way to lose weight - your body will (in most cases) just reduce your resting metabolism to make up the difference, which is quite unpleasant. Regular excercise helps far more for wieght loss by simply keeping your resting calorie burn rate high than it helps with the actual calories you burn, unless you can actually manage an hour of stairclimbing each day.

            Without

      • by evanbd (210358) on Monday December 15, 2008 @10:25PM (#26128071)
        0.0005%? You've seen 200,000 patients? Impressive.
    • by FooGoo (98336)
      Citation needed....youtube perhaps?
    • Initially, I too, found it quite sinister experiencing the unconscious me but that subsided pretty quickly. I began recording myself (audio) because I was having a very intense paralysis/possession dream. I wanted to know whether I said/did anything during these dreams. What I discovered was shocking. In the past year I've screamed, shouted, giggled, made bizarre comments and strange sounds, hummed etc. It is constantly surprising to experience the varied pitches and vibes coming out of my mouth. I sh
      • BTW: Your audio posts *are* frikkin' hilarious. I'mma gonna get a mic and record myself sometime in the next couple of months. I've been told that I talk a *lot* while I sleep. (I've even woken myself up a time or too!)

  • Are they sure this stuff actually came from her? I get spam like this all the time - just not from people I know.

  • When you sleep, you are in a Theta/Delta state of consciousness (generally 0.5 - 7 cycles per second). Doesn't mean you can't function, you just function in a very different state of consciousness as you do when you're awake (Beta/Alpha, genrally 8-40 cps). Theta states are associated with meditation, "super learning" and other things (possibly sleep walking/talking/emailing).

    At the very least, I find it intriguing and would love to learn more about how people communicate during these states of consciousnes

  • I've apparently made calls to other people at 8 in the morning without remembering it 2 hours later. In fact, I was quite confused when they referenced the earlier call, I didn't believe them at first. But I figured that my cell phone log isn't lying to me. I was told that I was quite intelligible, too. Oh yeah, before somebody asks, I wasn't high or on sleeping meds, although I might have gone to bed late.

  • by Skyshadow (508) * on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:43PM (#26125895) Homepage
    I have a history of sleepwalking from time to time, usually when very stressed.

    Back in 2000 when I was trying to find a job before college ended, I got up, logged into my Linux box, sudo'ed to root and changed the root password -- to this day, I have no idea what I reset that sucker to.

    In 2002 when I was (rightly) worried I was about to be laid off, I crawled into our closet, started tossing my wife's shows out and screaming about needing to rewire to stop my idiot users. I have no idea.

    Anyhow, based on the few times I've woken up during this, it's like I'm acting in a way that makes perfect sense but obviously does not -- I'm operating from a completely made-up set of rules for my reality.

    • by syousef (465911)

      My wife once can home from hospital after having her shoulder located, quite drugged up with pain medication. I put her to bed and asked her if she'd like the window left open to which she responded "Yes please, leave it open to let the butterflies in". I also told her about getting my boat license, and she told her parents (avid boaters) about it but a week later when I mentioned it she said "When did you get your boat license? You never told me!"

  • Marisa? Does that mean the date is off?

    C'mon, I thought we were finally getting somewhere. I even went out and bought the finest wine and caviar, all for you, my 44-year-old somnambulist. Does this mean my robe and wizard hat will continue to collect dust?

  • Doctors have reported the first case of someone using the internet while asleep...

    ...to include System Administrators and it won't be that surprising... :-)

  • This would happen on the graveyard shift back in the day. I only ever sent out one that was mildly incoherent.

    I caught myself on all the rest. I wish I still had the file I kept of them; a few of the gems I kinda remember:

    something about hot dogs

    information regarding the customer's order of shoes arriving on time.

    I worked at a domain registrar/hosting company :)

  • ...and i bet she got qwertyitis too...
  • I read the secrets that you keep
    When you're posting in your sleep

    A friend said he'd been caught contributing code to a dial-up BBS he was co-sysop of while asleep (a GBBS system, writing ACOS (a variety of BASIC) code). The sysop at the console broke into chat while he was typing, and he just kept typing code into the chat buffer instead of the editor, not getting any audible signal that his mode had changed. And it wasn't just a data send as there would be typos, pauses, and corrections made to the typos.

  • by david.given (6740) <dg AT cowlark DOT com> on Monday December 15, 2008 @07:27PM (#26126401) Homepage Journal

    Back in 2005 I entered Nanowrimo: National Novel Writing Month. You have to write a 50,000 short novel in the month of November. That's a lot of writing. It took me about two hours per day, every day, and as I suck at scheduling this meant I ended up doing it late at night instead of sleeping.

    The result was that I would occasionally fall asleep at the keyboard. And keep writing. Some of it was gibberish:

    I spent the rest of the night running things over in my head, tyo get them straight before running down, and helping a friend try and find a contact lens he once dropped on the beach.

    Some of it made sense, but was just strange:

    Personally, I suspected that those rock-eating worm creatures had just taken over the planet. It would probably sdve a lot of time.

    (No, rock-eating worm creatures did not feature anywhere in the story.)

    Some of it was my subconscious talking to me:

    I was beginnig to become a veteran; the mind-numbing perspectives flashed by, until I became aware of a jagged corner on the side of another corner and cnother...

    I shook my head and the nightmarish image faded. Must get some more sleep, I thought idly.

    But I was really pleased with this, which is an entire appropriate nightmare dream sequence that I wrote in my sleep:

    My dreams, such as they were, were haunted by the memory of magic: the feel of the magician rummaging around in the back of my mind; the inexpressible flow of power as I held the power stone; watching Chrana's grain of sugar skipping about on the table... power and energy flowed round in endless circles, while I was trapped in the middle unable to dip my hands into the flow. On one side of the vortex Sarah screamed and threw her hands up in front of her face as the car spun. On the other, Chrana gleefully juggled monstrous blocks of sugar. At last, with a burst of sheer willpower, I flung myself into the flow only to discover that I had limitless power but nothing to focus on. I strove for focus and perceived the universe, but was powerless to change anything...

    (All typos original. This is all first draft stuff, straight from my subconscious!)

    Unfortunately the whole thing, a technical fantasy novel, turned out to have pretty major plot flaws in it which I never got round to fixing. But if I ever end up finishing it, that last passage is definitely going in.

    • by Aphoxema (1088507)

      That actually makes amazing sense, it's like some kind of startling gaze into your Id.

      Do it more o.o

    • by puto (533470)
      Reads like you were channeling Carlos Casteneda after Don Juan Mateos had just dosed him with one of his plant concoctions in order to get him to see the crack between worlds.
    • That is absolutely amazing, what you wrote in your sleep. I've never written/typed while sleeping, but I have had lots of lucid dreams. One of which I remember quite well (most recent), where I was conversing with a dream character about the fact that I was lucid dreaming. I remember, word for word, one sentence I muttered to him, trying to explain the concept of lucid dreaming:

      "It's like virtual reality for your brain, but you're not in it (your brain)."

      That always stuck with me. Your excerpt makes me wond

  • Please keep this crap in the idle section ... PLEASE. What the hell are you guys thinking?
  • I swear to you this really happened [webwizardry.net] a few years ago. The transcript was slightly edited for clarity (a few unrelated comments were removed), but f0rked claimed to have no memory of this.

    Note the reference to Ripper [anus.com], which he thought was funny at the time.

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