Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
The Internet Networking

Charter Launches 60 Mbps Service 299

Posted by timothy
from the deepening-the-digital-divide dept.
ndogg writes "While other companies are throttling their services, and capping bandwidth, Charter Communications, the cable company, is launching a 60/5 Internet service, starting in St. Louis, MO. It's certainly not cheap, starting at 129.99 per month (add another 10 if it's not being bundled with television or phone.) Currently, it's the fastest down stream speed available, and being a cable company, they potentially have greater reach than FiOS." However, there may be a risk to putting too much money down on this service; Charter Communications as a company faces some serious financial problems right now. As reader Afforess writes, "rumors abound that Paul Allen may just cut his losses and run," by selling the company. (Allen is the majority stockholder.)
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Charter Launches 60 Mbps Service

Comments Filter:
  • by alain94040 (785132) * on Thursday January 29, 2009 @07:01PM (#26660041) Homepage

    I don't care so much about the download speed of 60 Mbit/s (although it would allow streaming of live HD, which requires 6 - 10 Mbit/s sustained).

    What I'd love is the upload bandwidth of 5 Mbit/s. Forget about file swapping: the killer app for the family is video conferencing that works. Can you see me? I'm tired of the pixellized, ugly, breaking video chat on skype.

    Of course, I wouldn't trust a soon-to-be-bankrupt provider on anything, especially the promise that they don't plan to throttle the traffic. Yeah, right!

    --
    5 Reasons You Shouldnâ(TM)t Incorporate Your Business [fairsoftware.net]

    • I'm almost ready to boycott the internet.

      Every other country in the world can get symmetric broadband by now.

      • by Fex303 (557896)

        Every other country in the world can get symmetric broadband by now.

        What planet are you living on? Outside of Europe and Japan, everyone's at least as screwed as the US when it comes to broadband.

        • by Chabo (880571) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @07:19PM (#26660277) Homepage Journal

          You mean outside of the industrialized world?

        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by Daengbo (523424)

          What planet are you living on? Outside of Europe and Japan, everyone's at least as screwed as the US when it comes to broadband.

          Every time I go into a supermartket, I'm beaten over the head with 100Mb/s service for about USD25 a month with a year contract. No caps. I don't know the upstream and I'm too lazy to switch off of my current service at about 50Mb/s for the same price.

          XPeed. 100Mb/s. Add Korea to your list.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by athakur999 (44340)

        You can get symmetrical speeds with FIOS. Their 20/20 plan is $65/month. Of course, the usual disclaimers about limited FIOS availability apply.

        I use their 20/5 plan which is $10/month cheaper. 5 Mb/s is fast enough for all of the time critical upstream I need (VOIP and the occasional video call) and it's fast enough that I can get to a >1 share ratio on torrents in a reasonable amount of time. I'd rather put that $10 into savings instead.

        • by hclewk (1248568)

          When I lived in Provo, UT I got 15/15 for $40 per month and a $100 setup fee. Now I live in Texas and I get 10/1 for $65 through Charter. It makes me sad.

        • Their 20/20 plan is $65/month.

          I live in a small town in Iowa, and $65/month gets me 100/100 + phone. (They refuse to unbundle it completely -- it's that or pay more and get TV instead of, or TV with, that phone.)

          Actual, real Internet connectivity may be less than that, I'm not sure. However, I have gotten sustained 11 megabyte per second transfers between home and work, with both on the same ISP. That's video data, over scp -- so while there is compression happening, I doubt it's doing much.

          Doesn't seem quite full-duplex -- I'm getting

    • What I love about charter is how they don't make secret deals with the RIAA as far as I know. They sell you internet access, you get it. Deal is done.

      I wish I could get charter where I am at.

    • by Chabo (880571)

      It was nice being on campus at my undergrad school during winter break... at one point I was one of about 10 people sharing the huge pipe the school had (multiple 1Gbps connections), in order to normally feed 16,000 students and staff. The on-campus network was 100mbps ethernet, so ~12MBps down and up.

      In order for Remote Desktop to my Windows machine to run smoothly, I had to limit my BitTorrent client to 2MBps down, 500kBps up. That was nice... :)

      Now I'm in the Real World (tm), and I have my Comcastic (tm)

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by vindimy (941049)
        Here at UCLA (which participates in Internet2 [internet2.edu] and CENIC [cenic.org] and some other organizations), it's not uncommon to see 40 Mbps download/upload in offices and 25 Mbps download/upload through the campus-wide WiFi for students. I can get WinXP SP3 in around 5 seconds...

        Not to brag - I actually fear what might happen if some worm or hacker gets access to such high-speed network... :/
    • Bredbandsbolaget charges 349 SEK for this including telephony (which normally cost 125 SEK by the regular network.)

      349 Swedish kronor = 43.616973 U.S. dollars

      Normal price is written as 399 sek for 60 mbps, 50 sek for telephony and 100 sek off the price.

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by etnoy (664495)
        Actually, BBB charges 270SEK (around $34) for 100/40mbps. I'm on it right now, and it is fast! Also, telephony included and I get a fixed IP, no download cap and all ports open in all directions.
        • by aliquis (678370)

          40 mbps up? With what? The regular ethernet stuff? We're not on 10 mbps up longer?

        • by aliquis (678370)

          Also isn't the price for the ethernet option 320? You pay 270 because you have SIP thru them? Or what? Why haven't anyone told me? For how long has this been?

          I pay 75 SEK for my "call all swedish landlines free"-SIP, but I'd switch in an instant if I'll pay -50 SEK :D

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Lumpy (12016)

      Also it really does not matter much. If they dont have 1TB pipe running to the headends for the 60Mbps services it's gonna be saturated within minutes.

      Also, If most servers you connect to are no where near that it's a waste. Sites like slashdot and others throttle individual users to keep you from sucking it all up for everyone else.

      And then with Charter hating P2P people, you wont get any faster Torrents.

      My 1.2mbps DSL at home is as fast as Comcast's 5mpbs when it comes to downloads and video streaming.

      • Also, If most servers you connect to are no where near that it's a waste.

        I have 100 mbit, and I can tell you that while most servers aren't anywhere near that, it's not a complete waste. I can run torrents without even thinking about whether I'm lagging others in the house -- I'm not. Ditto for YouTube, or just about anything else.

        And, plenty of sites will let you download as much as you like.

        And then with Charter hating P2P people, you wont get any faster Torrents.

        Yeah, there is that. And with Charter actively inserting ads, it won't be much good for legit surfing, either.

      • by timeOday (582209)

        Also it really does not matter much. If they dont have 1TB pipe running to the headends for the 60Mbps services it's gonna be saturated within minutes.

        Only if too many people use it at once. And why would they? How many hours per day of high-def video will each household be streaming? That's approximately the total amount of bandwidth that people can use. Once people have at least that much upstream and downstream, the need is met and anything more is likely to go unused.

        You might think my argument

    • What I'd love is the upload bandwidth of 5 Mbit/s

      It would be nice (I live in NYC and the largest upload link I can get at home is 512kbps), but I don't think 5Mbps is enough to be all that pleased. FiOS, on the other hand, is offering a symmetric 20Mbps connection for $70/month.

      I know we're probably in the minority, and that the majority of people probably don't care much about upload speeds. But it's not that small of a majority, I don't think.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Danny Rathjens (8471)
      What's with the fake signature block you have put into your comment? Trying to trick search engines into promoting your blog? Please stop abusing the system and only put your actual comment in the comment field.
  • Full power (Score:5, Funny)

    by Panspechi (948400) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @07:06PM (#26660103)
    Just plug it straight into my veins... oh yeah, that's the good stuff.
  • According to Fawaz, Charter will not impose bandwidth-usage caps on any of its high-speed Internet subscribers. By contrast, Comcast's policies limit users to 250 Gigabytes of data consumption per month.

    Nice. Very nice. I guess there are providers out there interested in competing on the technical merits of their service, while giving the consumers what they want.

    • by westlake (615356)
      I guess there are providers out there interested in competing on the technical merits of their service, while giving the consumers what they want.

      and if the majority of your customers are stressed enough to consider scaling back to dial-up at $10/mo what then?

    • Speaking as someone who is using Charter internet to type this comment right now, their service is awful. It costs too much, the tech support and service people are crap, and it COSTS TOO MUCH. We could be getting DSL from the phone company for half of what we pay now, but their high-speed service area stops about a mile from our house. And we're definitely not going back to dial up. As soon as we can get internet from AT&T, we're ditching Charter's services and going to a dish. Charter isn't inter
      • I was stuck with these bastards for a year. They went out of their way to get file sharers (this was two years ago before it was cool), had terrible speeds (we were lucky to get 100 kbps down and we were on a 10Mbps plan), and frequent outages.

        It was slower to connect to my school's servers from two blocks away than from 2000 miles away in Michigan (using a Comcast "5Mbps" connection that was 2/3 the price)

    • by sremick (91371)

      There are a few left. I gave Adelphia (now Comcast) the boot and went with DSL from a local telecom. 6Mbit down, 1MBit up... but it tends to be faster than Adelphia ever was with their supposed 8Mbit, and I get some of the best tech-support and customer-service I've ever experienced.

      Might as well enjoy it while it lasts I suppose. I had the same thing recently with my cell company (Unicel) until they were just bought out by AT&T *barf*.

  • Lulz (Score:4, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 29, 2009 @07:08PM (#26660121)

    Charter stock trades at 9 cents a share today. That's up from 8 cents yesterday.

    • So they increased shareholder value by over 10%? That's a pretty sweet deal, I would have been all over that if I knew it was going to happen.

    • by reboot246 (623534)
      So, instead of paying my last Charter bill, I could have bought 1800 shares of Charter stock. Yep, they'll be out of business shortly, but I'd love to have that faster service.
  • 60/5 meg (Score:2, Insightful)

    by nurb432 (527695)

    And with what limitation?

    If its anything like comcast you can burn thru that in no time. Top speed ratings are worthless if you cant actually use it.

  • chapter 11 (Score:5, Informative)

    by fredan (54788) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @07:13PM (#26660175) Homepage Journal
    from wikipedia:

    "On January 28, 2009, Charter Communications reportedly filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy."

    Charter Communications [wikipedia.org]
  • by sempiterna (1463657) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @07:15PM (#26660213)
    As a previous charter customer, I wont ever re-subscribe to charter if I have the choice of providers. For the first year I had charter latency was worse than dial up. All their customer service would tell us is that "It's a known issue and it's bound to improve.. sometime." No credits, no refunds, just.. that's how it is, deal with it or cancel your account. After they upgraded their backbone, they blocked port 25, 80, 110, and most of the server ports inbound, and their upload speed was really, really poor. (5 mbs service, with 128k upload MAX) I would not want 60mbs internet if they blocked nearly everything I want to do on the internet.
    • by Tumbleweed (3706) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @08:31PM (#26660981)

      Yeah, but then I'd be living in Finland.

      Not. Gonna. Happen.

    • things work differently here in the U.S.

      improvements in consumer broadband is hard to come by when all your major ISPs are plagued by internal corruption [wikipedia.org] & incompetence [wikipedia.org]. of course, the high prices & poor quality of service just get blamed on file-sharers and power users. that way nothing ever gets fixed, and you never have to improve your operations.

      it's so bad that some communities have had to resort to simply sidestepping private ISPs and setting up municipally-run public ISPs. that's about the on

  • fastest? (Score:5, Informative)

    by MoFoQ (584566) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @07:16PM (#26660229)

    fastest? no.
    As an example, there are several providers that have 1Gbps (1000Mbps) service in Japan
    here's one [eonet.jp]
    here's another [gate02.ne.jp]

    Maybe the fastest for US cable internet companies thus far but it's nowhere near being the fastest, period.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      Shame /. isn't a US centric site~

    • fastest? no. As an example, there are several providers that have 1Gbps (1000Mbps) service in Japan here's one [eonet.jp] here's another [gate02.ne.jp]

      Maybe the fastest for US cable internet companies thus far but it's nowhere near being the fastest, period.

      What, are you trying to make us feel bad? This is a U.S. Web site discussing a U.S-centric article about a specific U.S. Internet Service Provider. What was your point again?

      • by Spatial (1235392)

        What was your point again?

        It's interesting. Not everything is about the size of your e-penis.

      • by MoFoQ (584566)

        No...slashdot is a global web site.

        There are plenty of articles from outside the US
        Swedish professors "censored" by Israeli company [slashdot.org]
        Red Dwarf [slashdot.org] (need I say more?)
        ISP in Ireland in bed with RIAA [slashdot.org]
        Dutch pirates [slashdot.org] ("arrrrrr")

        no matter how high tech the US is (moreover, the silicon valley)...it is so rudimentary when it comes to Internet speeds (and I'm referring to just the high population density locations).
        shoot...the east coast has fiber deployment and higher cable speeds while we in the silicon valley have crap.

        • No...slashdot is a global web site.

          Which is all irrelevant to the topic at hand, which is a specific U.S Internet provider. What was your point again?

  • What is the cap? Can you only get to the max of 60meg in off hours?

  • by Frosty Piss (770223) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @07:16PM (#26660239)
    Incedently, Charter is Paul Allen's company. They are bleeding money right now with a stock price of... EIGHT CENTS! They've been skirting insolvency for a few years now and the Securities and Exchange Commission is saying that if they fail to refinance some of their debt, they will be forced into bankruptcy.

    http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2008683150_charter29.html [nwsource.com]
  • Why the lame upload? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Hsensei (1055922)
    I love the 20/20mb/s service i get with FiOS. My friends leech off my FTP at 1MB/s. and for only 70 USD. I wanted the upload, I could care less about down. I do cheer more competition in these speeds that can only help bring prices down across the board.
  • Man, that makes my RoadRunner Turbo (22 Mbit down/ 2 Mbit up) look like crap!
  • It's cable. (Score:4, Informative)

    by DurendalMac (736637) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @07:28PM (#26660389)
    This is a cable connection. Sure, they advertise 60Mbps, but your mileage will vary, namely far down. In the evening you will likely NEVER hit that, especially if a lot of people in your neighborhood are online. That'll saturate a shared cable region in no time. That and your latency is probably going to suck. Maybe I'm just bitter, but I just ditched Commiecast 8Mbps service for 7Mbps DSL and I'm happy as hell that I did. No more random connection drops, no more shitty latency spikes, just a clean connection so far. I hate cable.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The limit for one 256bit QAM is 38.8mbps. This means that Charter is using a second QAM channel (must be using a DOCSIS 3 modem) to provide the extra bandwidth. If anything, this effectively doubles the amount of bandwidth they have with only a select few customers taking full advantage of it.

      At the Cable Expo in Philadelphia last summer, I saw demonstrations of 150mbps synchronous connections on coax cable using 4 QAM's.

      Seems like if they do it right, all of their customers in this market will benefit from

  • But call me back when you have 60/60 at a reasonable price.

  • by GPLDAN (732269) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @07:36PM (#26660479)
    Charter is the cable company in rural areas, while Comcast gets the major cities. This is one of those areas that I don't fully understand the legislation at the state level that would allow this. How does Comcast get Ann Arbor, Brighton, most of the Detroit suburbs and Charter has to handle the rural areas of Livingston, Jackson, Washtenaw, Wayne, etc.

    What a brilliant deal for Comcast. They get densely populated areas where their return on infrastructure investments are the best, and where more affluent people live, and Charter gets to handle all the heavy lifting of running a cable network in the hard to reach places.

    I always wondered how that cherry-pick arrangement came to pass, if any of you know, please respond because that would perhaps enlighten us as to Charter's financial woes.

    On the flip side of that, I visited a datacenter for Charter and it was really nice, obvious they spent alot on it.

    Oh, and BTW, Charter filed Chapter 11 yesterday.
    • I always wondered how that cherry-pick arrangement came to pass, if any of you know, please respond because that would perhaps enlighten us as to Charter's financial woes.

      Corruption, bribery, and malfeasance in office. Obviously Comcast put in the winning bid.

      Any more questions?

    • by Gybrwe666 (1007849) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @10:26PM (#26661825)

      Its very simple, really, and there is nothing sinister or state-regularted about it (which, in some minds, might be the same thing...

      Charter grew up like every other cable provider: acquisition. Cable franchises are granted on a city (or county) by city (or county) basis. In other words, Charter (or a company it acquired) negotiated at some point with the municipalities in question and bought the rights to provide service.

      So, they bought those cities.

      Note that rural areas are generally much cheaper for a cable company to expand into. Two reasons: one, franchises are cheaper, because of the lower number of potential subscribers, and two, in a rural area the costs associated with building a system are *RADICALLY* cheaper. For instance, in the county of Charters HQ (St. Louis, County, Missouri) the average cost per foot (inclusive) to lay fiber is about $8/foot. (Okay, this was the cost in 2002, but it will suffice for this discussion.) However, if you across the river from St. Louis, into Southern Illinois (also Charter territory) the cost per foot averages about $2 per foot. (also 2002 figures). In other words, a sparsely populated, more rural or rural area *CAN* be a cheap acquisition and buildout for a provider. Obviously, this is dependent on simple cost-ratios, and there will come a point where an area is simply too underpopulated to cost-effectively support.

      Also, you have to look at Charter's history to understand why they have lots of rural populations under their belts. The original founders, headed up by Jery Kent, all lived in rural areas of Missouri. When Paul Allen bought into the company, he had completely and totally bought into the "wired world" concept. As a result, between the founders (who desparately wanted service in areas nearly and hour from the edges of St. Louis), Jerry Kent, and the relative cheapness of such systems, there was a gold-rush mentality on these outlying systems that no one wanted.

      So Charter ended up in lots of smaller systems and areas.

      Not necessarily a bad business plan, just one they screwed up with some unrelated decisions much later.

      Bill

  • by RzUpAnmsCwrds (262647) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @07:42PM (#26660519)

    To all the people who are going to point out how much better broadband is elsewhere.

    How much do you pay for an 1100 sq ft (102 m^2) apartment? How much do you pay for energy? For gas? For food?

    Do you REALLY want to get in to a cost of living comparison between, say, Tokyo and here? Because I will GLADLY accept my crappy 12Mbps Comcast internet in exchange for 3-4 times more living space.

    And, by the way, "gigabit" Internet service often isn't. My university has "gigabit" Internet service (in that the computer labs are wired with GigE and 10G uplinks), but the entire campus shares 4Gbps of Internet bandwidth. For anything but other universities (Internet2) or Akamai (local mirror), it's not significantly faster than the 12Mbps Comcast I have at my apartment. Of course, the fact that everyone is torrenting probably has something to do with that.

    • It gets worse than that, if you don't have a newish car(<10 years old), you'll pay huge fees for that too. The fees actually start at three years and ramp progressively higher.

      My family has four older cars, so if I were living in Japan I'm sure I could effectively multiply my rent by three to figure what it costs to register/store/insure them. I guess it's cultural bias, but if I were in charge of manufacturing cars I would be glad to show that 20-30 year old ones still work great. For that matter I h
    • by Spatial (1235392)
      Nice post. [youtube.com]
    • by HalfFlat (121672)

      I can't compare with the US. But I can compare with living in a major Australian city.

      Rent per square meter is much higher in Tokyo; this is undeniable. But:

      • If you're willing to compromise on raw space, you can find much cheaper accommodation in inner city Tokyo than you can in central Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Perth, Darwin or Canberra.
      • In most of Tokyo, the public transportation is so good that you do not need a car. This is not an exagguration.
      • That same public transportation is not only
    • by Yuuki Dasu (1416345) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @11:59PM (#26662373)

      The problem with your argument is that you assume that only Tokyo has good broadband. The whole country has amazing connectivity.

      How much do you pay for an 1100 sq ft (102 m^2) apartment? How much do you pay for energy? For gas? For food?

      I live in a city of about 80k people, about 45 minutes from Kyoto. I live alone in an apartment that's a very comfortable size for me - over 400 sq ft - and pay only about $400 a month in rent. Even in winter I only pay about $45 a month in electricity. Public transportation and my bike mean I don't even know offhand the price of gas. Food, I can cook for myself cheaply or go out to low-end restaurants for around $10.

      My 50mbps cable costs me $40 a month.

  • by geekmux (1040042) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @07:46PM (#26660569)

    I guess it's just me, or the local market I live in, but I can get 50/5 fiber service for $80/month now. WiMAX services in the area offer up to 150/150 (no, that's not a typo).

    Local university speed tests are pushing 90 down and 80 up.

    I guess I'm just lucky in my area. Always has seemingly been ahead of the bandwidth curve. Nothing against others offering this, as it's definitely fast.

    • I guess it's just me

      Lucky you. Best I can do is 18 down, 1 up with AT&T U-Verse.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      I guess it's just me, or the local market I live in, but I can get 50/5 fiber service for $80/month now. WiMAX services in the area offer up to 150/150

      Gee thanks for all that info. Too bad you were so much more interested in talking about yourself than in actually passing any useful information along that you left out where your "local market" actually is.

      • by geekmux (1040042) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @08:40PM (#26661055)

        I guess it's just me, or the local market I live in, but I can get 50/5 fiber service for $80/month now. WiMAX services in the area offer up to 150/150

        Gee thanks for all that info. Too bad you were so much more interested in talking about yourself than in actually passing any useful information along that you left out where your "local market" actually is.

        First off, as a fellow smart ass, I can recognize a compliment. Spank you very much.

        Secondly, to answer your question, my local market is the Tampa Bay area.

        (That would be in Florida.)

        (Florida, the one in the United States.)

        (In case you were wondering...)

  • If they go out of business, then you don't pay.
    Most likely someone will buy them the bankruptcy and they will need to honor the previous contract for consumers.

    Now, I wouldn't pay any in advance.

  • by Miseph (979059) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @08:11PM (#26660791) Journal

    I'd never realized that Paul Allen had anything to do with Charter, let alone ran it. I admit that I did very little homework on them before signing up... just enough to find out they were the only viable broadband option available to me where I live (DSL is too far from a switch and therefore very slow, there are no other cable companies in the municipality because of an exclusivity contract, and there's simply no way I can afford a T# or satellite connection). I also soon found out that they're ridiculously overpriced, have terrible customer support, routinely underserve their customers and can't even manage a channel numbering system that remotely reflects the actual FCC granted channels the networks broadcast over.

    It figures that only a company run by a Microsoft exec could actually make my blood boil worse than Comcast.

    • by Jherek Carnelian (831679) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @09:07PM (#26661227)

      It figures that only a company run by a Microsoft exec could actually make my blood boil worse than Comcast.

      Allen was co-founder and left Microsoft in 1983. He's hardly to blame for what's happened since.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Vertana (1094987)

      I have Charter and routinely have charges that don't add up. Only those $2 agent fees of course... agents that I never talk to because they don't know anything (although that's every ISP)? And once my Internet went down and after a few phone calls to Charter, they sent over a technician under the understanding that if it was due to a problem on my side of the network (I.e. cables, my LAN, etc.) then I would have a charge, however, if the problem lay on their end, they would not charge me. Turns out they acc

  • Money down? I see no mention of 'money down' anywhere except the FUD warning. You pay your monthly fee, and you get your internet. There's nothing to be scared of.

  • A PuTTy ssh session just doesn't need all that much speed.

    • A PuTTy ssh session just doesn't need all that much speed.

      True, but it does benefit from low latency.

      The typical dial-up connection would have enough latency to make an interactive shell a bit annoying (I've done plenty of SSH-over-dialup). You can work around it by writing little scripts and then uploading them (or pasting them into the console window) instead of typing everything into the console manually, but it's still annoying.

  • Yah, right! (Score:4, Informative)

    by Vskye (9079) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @09:34PM (#26661459)

    Just from my personal experience with Charter.. in our area I had their 5MB down service and it sucked bad. I was getting just a tad above 56k modem speeds most times and I called support and lucky me, I wandered into a bunch of script reading droids in India. I got so pissed off, when I went and paid the bill I brought the modem with me and told them I canceled, for good.

    I have AT&T DSL service now and I've been happy. (about 4 blocks from the switching office)
     
    Personally they'll never be able to offer that fast of service here.

  • I had Charter for years before Verizon brought FiOS into the area. It wouldn't matter if they had quantum routers that somehow got the internet to me microseconds before someone finished writing it; I am not enough of a sadist to do business with that black hole of customer service ever again.

    If Comcast is really worse than Charter as I hear, I literally weep for their subscriber base.

  • by sponga (739683) on Thursday January 29, 2009 @10:49PM (#26661963)

    I remember all the naysayers about how cable was doomed and that docsis 3.0 was vaporware, FIOS was supposed to be the next big thing. Well it came to my area as one of the first places in the nation and "mehhhh" is all I have to say, but luckily our city council has their heads screwed on straight and demanded more speeds/options for their citizens. FIOS could blow them out of the water, but they hold back or you have to cough up big bucks to get real fiber speeds.

    As far as I can see, FIOS has laid down the fiber and they are still withholding speeds in a lot of areas where service is available.

    Alone head to head FIOS has faster speeds, but might be a little more expensive and you have to sign a damn contract with them for a couple years.
    I found my ping to actually be better on cable than the same FIOS line coming into the home, roommate has FIOS and I have cable internet because triple package is cheaper.

    TWC is doing the same thing nationwide with the implementation of docsis 3.0, since they skipped 2.0.

    Although to be honest, 99% of the websites/server out there do not even supply the speeds close to max out the connection of fiber. Everyone on FIOS trying to download at max speed will never work, streaming already works pretty good and this will be a glory to P2p/Warez scene.

I use technology in order to hate it more properly. -- Nam June Paik

Working...