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GrandCentral Reborn As Google Voice 206

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the probably-should-try-that-out-again dept.
Some anonymous person wrote in to say that Google has relaunched and rebranded GrandCentral as "Google Voice." The article says it will "revolutionize telephones. It unifies your phone numbers, transcribes your voice mail, blocks telemarketers and elevates text messages to first-class communication citizens." Sadly, the voicemail didn't integrate very nicely w/ my phone back in the day, so I guess I should give it a shot.
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GrandCentral Reborn As Google Voice

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  • Can't wait (Score:5, Informative)

    by oodaloop (1229816) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @09:47AM (#27165953)
    I signed up to be notified when it's available to new users.

    https://services.google.com/fb/forms/googlevoiceinvite/
    • Re:Can't wait (Score:5, Interesting)

      by SputnikPanic (927985) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @10:47AM (#27166851)

      I don't know, I'm becoming more and more wary about all the personal information Google is acquiring, and this is another area where Google is able to collect and store such information. Gmail, Calendar, Blogger, Desktop and now essentially, Phone Manager. The way things are going, soon Google will will be able to set your alarm clock for you without your direct input. They'll just know what time you need to wake up and voila.

      • by ultrafunkula (547970) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @10:52AM (#27166945)
        I use Google calendar to send me an SMS reminder each morning. I've set my phone up to play an alarm call for these SMS messages from Google - voila, a Google alarm clock. I just need to work out how to schedule the coffee maker and toaster and I'm all set...
        • Re:Can't wait (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Sparhawk2k (680674) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @11:26AM (#27167557)
          While that's cool I find the "alarm" function on my phone a bit easier...
          • Re:Can't wait (Score:5, Informative)

            by tlhIngan (30335) <slashdot@wor f . n et> on Thursday March 12, 2009 @12:01PM (#27168143)

            While that's cool I find the "alarm" function on my phone a bit easier...

            Probably more reliable too - SMS is like email - there's no guarantee in how long it'll take to get to the destination (or if it even gets there at all). The day you need your SMS-alarm to wake you up, is probably the day the SMS network gets slightly overloaded. (I've seen SMS' take days to arrive, and have heard of the oddball SMS duplication - where the same SMS was stuck in the system, and the recipient kept getting it twice an hour for 3 days straight).

      • by cparker15 (779546)

        The way things are going, soon Google will will be able to set your alarm clock for you without your direct input. They'll just know what time you need to wake up and voila.

        One less thing I have to remember to do... Sign me up!

      • Re:Can't wait (Score:5, Insightful)

        by eltaco (1311561) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @06:13PM (#27174171)
        I don't know, I'm becoming more and more wary about all the personal information Google is acquiring, and this is another area where Google is able to collect and store such information. Gmail, Calendar, Blogger, Desktop and now essentially, Phone Manager. The way things are going, soon Google will will be able to set your alarm clock for you without your direct input. They'll just know what time you need to wake up and voila.

        I totally agree, but I'm also looking forward to this. it's a hate-love-relationship. I really hate and abhor the fact, that there's a company out there gathering such immense amounts of data on everyone - for the company's gain, not the public's. On the flip side, I'm truly envious of the quantity, quality and accuracy of their statistical data. I love that this data will enable them all kinds of awesomely cool stuff. I hate that they're essentially using that information to exploit their users.
        it starts off nice and clean with direct and targetted advertising, which by itself might actually be helpful and not bore people with ads that don't have any relevancy to them. But if we project and exaggerate their prowess, we get to a stage where google can directly and on a massive scale, manipulate markets and behaviour.

        this, I'm not looking forward to.
    • I promise I'm not showing off, but I have a question for other existing GC users out there:
      I'm supposed to be able to "upgrade" to Google Voice if I have an existing GC account, but I don't seem to be able to do so.
      This is on the Google Voice info page [google.com]:

      What do I do if I am already a GrandCentral user?
      To upgrade to Google Voice, sign in to your GrandCentral account and follow the instructions at the top of your inbox.

      But when I sign in to my GC Inbox, I do not see any instructions at the top. Have they just not been put up yet?

      • Yes--the instructions just weren't there yet. Someone at Google jumped the gun on that info page. The instructions are now there--it consists of clicking on a button that says "Upgrade me" and then signing in to your google account.

  • I was hoping (Score:4, Insightful)

    by kcbanner (929309) * on Thursday March 12, 2009 @09:48AM (#27165961) Homepage Journal
    It would be a voice synth or something, that was really high quality. I was disapointed.
    • Yeah, I was wondering if I was the only one. Suddenly, a New York train station, Majel Barrett, and cell phones all converged in my mind. It was a happy place.

      Maybe I should go outside for awhile.

  • Pleasing Apple (Score:5, Informative)

    by MacColossus (932054) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @09:49AM (#27165971) Journal
    Maybe Google gave it up for undisclosed cash to Apple since they are using the same term for a new type of multicore support in Snow Leopard. Eric Schmidt sits on Apple's board. Crazier things have happened.
    • Re:Pleasing Apple (Score:5, Informative)

      by JustinOpinion (1246824) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @11:16AM (#27167365)

      Maybe Google gave [up the term "GrandCentral"] for undisclosed cash to Apple since they are using the same term for a new type of multicore support in Snow Leopard

      I think this has more to do with branding. Google likes to put their name in products they take over. "GrandCentral" doesn't sound like a Google product. "Google Voice" does (and tells you roughly what it's all about). When Google bought Keyhole [wikipedia.org], they re-branded the product "Google Earth".

      In fact take a look at this list of Google acquisitions [wikipedia.org]. Most of them were re-branded by Google, and most of the new names contain "Google" in them (with limited exceptions, like AdSense, which has a strong brand of its own).

      For something like YouTube, they didn't change the name since it already had a strong brand and following. But GrandCentral? It didn't have a huge following or mindshare. So rebranding it just makes sense. I doubt Apple had anything to do with it.

  • by D-Cypell (446534) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @09:52AM (#27166015)

    "Im sorry, I can't take your call right now, but if you leave your name, phone number and message, I will get back to you as soon as I am out of Beta...."

    • by L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @10:37AM (#27166685)
      "Thank you for leaving your message. Our content parsing algorithm has found that you were calling about 'were you Thursday night I saw you with her!' Would you like to hear some targeted advertisments for singles websites? We've automatically updated the contextual advertising database to reflect on the recipient's possible need for STD testing."
  • Free features (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 12, 2009 @09:52AM (#27166025)

    Last I heard all their features were free, but I kinda felt bad because I knew the ones I liked could disappear at any time because that was what they said the plan was after they left beta.
    All features would be free during the beta, and then they said the "core" ones would be free after that with the rest being paid.

  • by Viol8 (599362) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @10:02AM (#27166165)

    I don't want a revolutionary new phone - the basic idea of the telephone was got pretty much spot on in the 19th century - talk into mic , listen from earpiece. What I want is a phone service thats reliable , cheap and works in an emergency. What I DO NOT want is a phone service that gives me a friggin "select from the following options" load of BS when I lift up the receiver! I have enough of that crap when phoning help desks. As for listening in when someone leaves a message - wooooo! Someone correct me but I believe you've been able to do that with steam powered cassette based answerphones since the 1970s.

    • by Scutter (18425)

      While I agree with you on the "select from the following options" comment, the real benefit for me with GrandCentral is the phone aggregation feature. I don't have to keep telling my family and friends a new phone number, and I can have calls ring at any and all of my various phones (home, work, cell, skype). Is that "revolutionary"? I suppose so.

      • by SkyDude (919251)
        I signed up just for the reasons you mention. What I'd wish for is that Vonage offer a similar set of features.

        I know, forward to my Vonage number, and I do. What I've learned is that calls that come from GC to Vonage pick up a significant delay.

    • by LordKronos (470910) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @10:17AM (#27166369) Homepage

      Really? I didn't know that steam powered cassette based answerphones would let you listen in on a voicemail to your home line even though you were in the office. Like they always say...you learn something new every day.

      What I DO NOT want is a phone service that gives me a friggin "select from the following options" load of BS when I lift up the receiver

      Good news. If you had RTFA you would have read the part where it says this is optional.

      • I didn't know that steam powered cassette based answerphones would let you listen in on a voicemail to your home line even though you were in the office.

        Sure. All you need is a walkie-talkie next to the answering machine, and a robot to push the button whenever the machine starts recording.

        • Don't forget that your walkie talkie needs one hell of a range. And of course, you need to be comfortable with letting any random person listen in on your voicemail.

    • What I DO NOT want is a phone service that gives me a friggin "select from the following options" load of BS when I lift up the receiver! I have enough of that crap when phoning help desks.

      According to the article, they've made it an option to turn that off:

      Google Voice eliminates some of the annoyances of its predecessor. You can, if you wish, turn off that "press 1, press 2" option, so when the phone rings, you can just pick it up and start talking.

    • by Drakonik (1193977)

      "Back in my day, a phone was a phone and we didn't have any of you young hoodlums' fancy options. now get off my lawn!"

      Hooray, you like simplicity. FUCKING GREAT FOR YOU. Buy a simple phone plan and a simple phone for yourself, and let those who DO want fancy options and features have them.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      So a hand cranked phone you yell into while stanf right in front of it was the pinnicle of telephones? really?

      First off, you are making a mistake in limiting what a phone is. I suspect you haven't actually grokked that it is just a way of communication. Now we have lots of ways to communicate at a distance. Talking with someone in real time is just one of them.

      I can't think of any cell that isn't reliable and works in an emergency. Ironically, during black out in December, I used my G1 as a flashlight to fi

  • by LordKronos (470910) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @10:11AM (#27166285) Homepage

    Since Caller ID has become virtually useless for identifying anyone other than friends and family (it is regularly blocked or spoofed), it would be nice if Google Voice gave you the option to view the ANI info (which is what is used internally by the phone systems for billing and E-911, and is generally considered unspoofable). I've been waiting for someone to do so for a long time.

    • by lefiz (1475731) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @10:52AM (#27166941)
      I'm not quite sure why this is modded as funny, since CallerID and ANI ("Automatic Number Identification") are actually two separate elements of a call as noted above. ANI is a built in signaling component of SS7 that generally cannot be modified by the calling party. See definition here. [bandwidth.com]

      Still, although ANI may not be "spoofable," it can be manipulated or uninformative. For example, any call placed from any phone in my office carries a general company ANI even though the call could be originated from any of hundreds of phone numbers owned by the firm. We also have off-premise extensions (OPXs) that connect to the office PBX via SIP. Calls placed from those OPXs have the same ANI as calls made from the physical office, which would be deleterious if a call was placed to 911 from one of these phone. (We have implemented a safety workaround for this, but the point still stands.)

    • by mcgrew (92797)

      Since Caller ID has become virtually useless for identifying anyone other than friends and family (it is regularly blocked or spoofed)

      That's why it works for me. If a name shows up I answer the phone. If it's a number they can kiss my ass, I have a cell phone and pay by the minute and I'm not going to pay to be talked to by some random stranger.

  • I think I'd better keep an empty bladder for the next couple of days, so I don't pee my pants with excitement when I get the upgrade notice.

    Aw man, if I had an Android phone syncing my Gmail/Google Voice contacts, too... darn you, AT&T! Hurry up with that!

  • What's the deal with this statement in the summary?

    "Sadly, the voicemail didn't integrate very nicely w/ my phone back in the day, so I guess I should give it a shot."

    What's different between that and, "Sadly, Windows didn't work well for me in 2002, so I guess I should try Windows 7?" Or "Sadly, I hated my Nissan Altima from 2004, so my next purchase should be an Altima from 2009?"

    I'm not saying your shouldn't try it out, but that sentence reads like a big fat non sequitur.

    • by ArcherB (796902)

      What's the deal with this statement in the summary?

      "Sadly, the voicemail didn't integrate very nicely w/ my phone back in the day, so I guess I should give it a shot."

      What's different between that and, "Sadly, Windows didn't work well for me in 2002, so I guess I should try Windows 7?" Or "Sadly, I hated my Nissan Altima from 2004, so my next purchase should be an Altima from 2009?"

      I'm not saying your shouldn't try it out, but that sentence reads like a big fat non sequitur.

      Actually, it would be more like, "I loved Windows 3.11, but it didn't connect to the Internet well. Maybe I'll give XP a shot."

      It's not that he didn't like the system. One feature did not work well for him. That feature was a deal breaker. Now that a new version is out, he's hoping that one feature will work so he can benefit from the rest.

  • by MDMurphy (208495) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @10:19AM (#27166405)

    I've had a GrandCentral account for years, never used it. First thing I did today was login and search the help for "port number". As it has said for the past few years:

    "Although you can't currently port your existing number to GrandCentral, we hope to offer this option in the near future. Check out our blog to stay up-to-date with GrandCentral news and learn about new features."

    If I have to give the people who call me a new number, it's not worth it. Maybe if I was moving and was getting a new number anyway ( though cell phones and Vonage don't require this ), then I'd use it.

    • The whole point is to not have to give out your real number!

      I've been using grand central for about a year. I love it. It allows me to keep my cell number private.

      I also use the G1 Central app for android. It is the best solution out there.

      • Unfortunately, though, when you call out from your home number, it would transmit your home number instead of your google voice number.

        One solution is to block the number, which is not what I'd usually want. I want people to know I was calling them, but I'd want the caller ID to display the number they should call me back on.

        The other solution is to use a computer to setup the call (in which case google will call you and then connect you), or call into google voice, then enter the number it should forward i

        • by Rich0 (548339)

          Your other option would be to use phone services that allow you to set your caller-ID number. Most non-consumer VOIP services allow this. Google has an app for android which allows you to use your GrandCentral number as your caller ID.

          However, none of this avoids the need to port my number. Sure, I understand the idea is that I don't give everybody my direct numbers and instead give them the GrandCentral number. However, the problem is that I've ALREADY given out these numbers and would just as soon hav

          • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

            by whoop (194)

            I've been on GrandCentral for a year now, and thus far, it's been great for filtering many calls I don't care to receive much. Anytime I started a new service (cable, credit card, etc), I just tell them my GC number. Now, I don't waste my time with Comcast calling to try and tell me it's "only" $130 to add internet phone to my cable bill, or Best Buy calling me every day to say I haven't spent my $5 reward zone coupon. Hell, once I get converted and can just get text message transcripts, I'll be in heave

      • Exactly! We use our GrandCentral number when companies ask for our phone number. (Especially if the company is an online outfit that we're not sure we trust 100%.) If the company decides to tele-spam us (or sell our number to a company that tele-spams us), it's pretty easy to deal with them. Just mark those callers as "spam" and you won't be hearing from them again.

  • I quite literally used my invite to GC yesterday expecting to use it as is. I'm totally thrilled to see it becoming something even greater!

    There is an app for Android called "G1 Central" -- it integrates well with the G1. Hopefully Google will release an even better app or, better yet, integrate Voice with the entire dialing, contacts, and voice mail system. I'm sure T-Mobile would love to have the load off!

  • by ShannaraFan (533326) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @10:24AM (#27166465)

    I'll admit it - I still have a landline phone in my house. My satellite receivers require it, my DSL service requires the line, I feel better knowing it's there in case of an emergency, AND it keeps my teenagers from using up all of our shared cell minutes (the boy used 2700 minutes all by himself last month). In spite of these reasons, I was growing to hate that phone. We get maybe 2 legit calls on that phone a month, the rest are all telemarketers, a dozen a day sometimes, almost always between 6:00pm-9:00pm. It was driving me nuts.

    Along comes GrandCentral. Now, my home number is call-forwarded to GrandCentral. From there, I've whitelisted the numbers that are allowed to call us. Some of those numbers ring my cell, some ring my wife's, some ring both. Everything else goes to voicemail or is blocked as spam. Blocked callers hear a "number not in service" message. Voicemails are sent to us as emails.

    Very slick, VERY convenient, and it's removed a serious annoyance. Bliss...

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      " I was growing to hate that phone. We get maybe 2 legit calls on that phone a month, the rest are all telemarketers, a dozen a day sometimes, almost always between 6:00pm-9:00pm. It was driving me nuts.

      So why didn't you sign up with the Do Not Call Registry?

      Also, you can record the "sit" tones - the 3-tone "number not in service" tones that you hear - onto your answering machine, and the telemarketers predictive auto-dialer will hang up. As an added bonus, if someone calls you long-distance, they can stil

      • I *am* on the DNC... I'm using a broad definition of "telemarketer". I get calls from various charities seeking donations, "we'll be in your neighborhood tomorrow". I get scam calls telling me that my car warranty is about to expire, or trying to get me to subscribed to my local newspaper. There was the election spam during the month of October. The list goes on and on, but the bottom line is, I used to get a LOT of annoying, pointless phone calls - those all stopped thanks to GrandCentral.

      • I'm on the DNC list (since day 1) and it worked nearly perfectly for several years, but now I'm starting to get more callers. I think people are starting to catch onto the fact that their chances of getting any sort of punushment is almost zero. After this many years, only a few dozen telemarketers have been fined. Most businesses don't seem to care because they know they aren't big enough to catch the attention of the FTC.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      "(the boy used 2700 minutes all by himself last month). "

      well, you've add another thing for me to dread as my daughter get's older.

      Thanks~

      • My daughter doesn't use her phone to talk, with her it's texting. 23,000 text messages in one month. Luckily, our plan includes unlimited texting for all phones.

  • by WindBourne (631190) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @10:40AM (#27166737) Journal
    They are now listening in and converting Voice to Text. I suspect that they are using an AI to figure out the heurestics of converting voice to Text. At some point, that will be useful in a number of new areas. Not just better transcription, but will be EXTREMELY useful for selling products to the Feds. Want to know exactly what Abdula is saying to his Cousin Obama in Pakistan or Saudi Arabia? Of course, that will lead to new translators as well. It could convert nicely from Arabic to English.
    • by Churla (936633)

      Better yet, with newer technology that can track variances in the voice to determine if there is a high probability of lies in the statement can I sign up for a flag that would say "This person is probably lying to you in this voicemail" ?

      Imagine the usefulness.

  • by dustwun (662589) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @10:41AM (#27166755) Homepage
    So, now instead of listening to 3 different phone numbers for one person, the NSA simply has to listen to one, or just play the calls back later at their convenience. It's PERFECT! /I am not currently a tinfoil subscriber, I just channel their logic sometimes.
    • Does not matter to us. Bush said that we could listen to all conversations and we do.

      With that said, you do not have to tell all your friends about this. And yes, your mom went on to tell Harriet, her new beautician that you are sounding more and more tin foilish. Our suggestion is that you drop such silly conversations.
  • by Contusion (1332851) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @10:42AM (#27166771)
    How does google plan to make money off of this? TFA mentions that they'll be transcribing voicemail to text in near real-time. Will they also be sifting those voicemails for marketing keywords? If my buddy calls to brag about his new car, will I be seeing BMW ads next time I log into gmail?

    *Pulling the tinfoil hat even lower over the brow now* Will Google Talk also have the ability to monitor calls made through their service for marketing info?
    Yeah, it sounds like a great service, but what's the cost in privacy?
    • by caseih (160668)

      Quite likely, actually.

      As for the cost of the phone system itself, GrandCentral's money-making plan was very simple, actually. All telcos charge you to make calls to numbers on their network. This is why so many networks have voice mail prompts that are so stinking long. "Press * if you want to page this person, or press 5 to leave them a message, or just wait for the tone." It's all designed to keep callers on the line longer so they can charge them more. Of course American cell companies double-dip,

  • I sit at work all day with one phone on my desk and one in my pocket. It'd drive my colleagues (and me) nuts if they were both to ring at the same time.

    If this could use Latitude to see where my cellphone is, then I could set up certain behaviours, like:

    * If my mobile is at home during working hours, chances are I forgot it - ring the desk phone.
    * If it's at work during working hours, don't ring the desk phone.

    • by Vengeance (46019)

      You can toggle any given phone on or off at any time from the web interface. If you forget your cell phone, turn it off when you get to work. Turn off your work phone and turn on your cell phone when it's lunchtime and you are away from your desk. That's just one more advantage of GrandCentral, people can still reach you in such situations without trying every contact number they have.

    • It'd be nice if I could give different users different priority levels, too...

      For instance, my wife could have a PANIC button that she could push, that'd make Google Voice do everything it can to reach me - call all the phones, etc. While normally, she just gets "normal" priority...

  • Google Voice Basics: Requirements
    Print

    To use Google Voice, you just need a touch-tone phone and a Flash-enabled browser

    Oh well. It was -almost- really cool.

  • What about video? We've been told we'd have video phones for as long as we've been promised flying cars. Seriously, how hard would it be to integrate video into this phone system?

    OK, sure there are hardware and protocol requirements. But nearly any current "chat" service offers video. Even if you didn't want to do this directly from you computer, Google could sell or license phones that connect directly to your wireless router that have a small screen and camera. They could even sell a device that connec

    • Re:Video? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by raju1kabir (251972) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @11:15AM (#27167341) Homepage

      Who wants video phones? There are really only two times that I use (or want to use) video calling:

      1. Very occasionally, for remote meetings with colleagues that I know well and like, mainly because it is amusing and allows us to connect after not working side-by-side for a long time.

      2. When dealing with tiny kids at a long distance.

      Other than that, it's awful. I hate it for ordinary business calls because I can't read email, munch on raisins, pick my nose, stare out the window, or whatever else I'd normally do. And I've never felt like I want to see my friends when calling them.

      Assuming I'm not too terribly odd in this regard, the market for video is probably limited.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      IT's not hard, just very few peoplea ctually want that.

      In the 1970's, when talking about this idea with my grandfather, who was an inventor, he said:

      "How many woman want to be seen in their house coat when they answer the phone?"
      I think , in essence, is still true for many people.

      Bell had video phones in the 70's. Granted their PoC implementations was a tad bulky.

      With luck, people will continue to care less about what they look like, and then no one will care.

  • My question would be how well it will integrate with the andriod phones and specifically the G1. Can I have/build/get an app that will see it's from GrandCentral and prompt me on screen with the appropriate choices rather than a voice menu?

    Also, can my phone use it's settings for things like "route straight to voicemail" to handle the incoming calls for me?

  • Ah, another Google service that might one day disappear because Google don't think it's valuable enough.

    See Google Browser Sync and Google Notebook for other examples.

    • Ah, another Google service that might one day disappear because Google don't think it's valuable enough.

      That's true of every service, from every company, whether its in Beta or not. The only "guarantee" you have is with a contract, and only for the life of the contract, and even then its just them weighing the cost of buying off your contract or suffering an action for breach if you refuse to be bought off against the cost of maintaining the service that is not valuable to them.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by vux984 (928602)

        That's true of every service, from every company, whether its in Beta or not.

        True of every SERVICE. Untrue of every PRODUCT. If I could buy or download a copy and host it on my server, then it goes away when I'm done with it, not when someone else is.

  • Free Phone (So Far) (Score:2, Interesting)

    by ian13550 (697991)
    I setup my GC account a year or more ago. It's pretty slick for the most part. I have GC forward my incoming calls to my free Gizmo (http://gizmo5.com/pc/) SIP soft phone or SIP desk phone depending on whether I'm on the road or at my home office. For my friends I also have it ring my cellphone/homephone.

    I was also able to have GC import my Outlook address book (before they removed the feature) so all my contacts are already loaded.

    The nice part is that ALL calls are in-bound to me (so far) so I essen
  • And I find it really useful. I commonly have about 15 voicemails on average, and its really useful to see them all visually, what numbers they came in on, and skip thru the playback of the messages themselves.

    The other feature that I like is that the caller has to state their name when they call. Grandcentral calls me, tells me the name the person stated, then I have these options:

    1 Pick up the call
    2 Send to voicemail
    3 Send to voicemail and listen to the message as the caller leaves it

    This call screening i

  • This seems like a really great service. But remember that Google is public about the fact that they crawl through your data so that they can profit from it. Email is bad enough, but why anyone would send their whole life streaming through Google is beyond me. It continues to surprise me how comfortable and trusting people are getting with the cloud.

    Ignorance is bliss.. Sorry to wreck it for you.
  • by boyfaceddog (788041) on Thursday March 12, 2009 @11:28AM (#27167579) Journal

    I have a home land line, a work land line (mandatory), a work cell, and a home cell. My wife has a cell and my daughter has a cell.

    I can, depending on the caller ID (and I'm talking about reliable ones from people I know -- like my boss) have GC ring all of my phones, just my phones, just me work phones, just my home phones, my daughter's phone, or just about any combination I want.

    Or no phone at all.

    I suggest it for anyone who deals with clients and wants their number to remain the same after they leave a job. Get a GC number and put it on your business cards. Link up your cell and your desk phone. Leave the job, keep the cards, your clients may not even know the difference.

    It has always been a good service.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      It will be great getting telemarketers and other sales people able to get me no matter where I am.

  • To simplify, number portability makes this concept completely moot, and proprietary packages/offerings is a "bullet to the brain."

    Phone numbers aren't like email systems... users don't set-up lots of aliases, or have fractured paths that need to be reconciled (at least not most users). At the same time, the move to mobile and the ability to take your number with you means that everyone is already converging around a single number scheme.

    Basically we're all going to end up with a single phone that is also o

  • The google help page states:

    What do I do if I am already a GrandCentral user?
    To upgrade to Google Voice, sign in to your GrandCentral account and follow the instructions at the top of your inbox.

    I have nothing in my Grandcentral inbox though. I wonder if it's just delayed and I am impatient, or are they picking and choosing? I will check back later today. The SMS feature is a MUST HAVE for me.
  • It would be nice if google used this service as a way to ween people off of the whole POTS style phone numbers forever. I think that something more like voice://[identity]@[company] makes much more sense in the long run.

    When someone calls my google voice number, it could redirect the call to my google talk, skype, personal sip server, or even fall back to a landline or cell number if able. Then when I need to contact someone inside the POTS network, it would be nice if there was a way to multiplex back ou

  • Why the hell am I being linked to a registration-required site? What is this, reddit?

  • I understand all the features and there use, but whywuold someone want to use it?

    "Whenever somebody dialed your uni-number, all of your phones rang at once."

    WTF? No, I do not want all my phones ringing. I have separate phones for a reason.

    many of the features listed already come with my G1, and the iPhone does them as well. I'm sure other smart phones have these features.

    Maybe when I see it in action I'll change my mind, but right now I don't see why the average person would need or want this.

A sheet of paper is an ink-lined plane. -- Willard Espy, "An Almanac of Words at Play"

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