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KDE Project Invites Ideas With Online Brainstorm 131

Posted by timothy
from the gnome-project-has-telepathy dept.
ruphus13 writes "In addition to working with the community for source code, KDE is looking to democratize idea creation and innovation via its new initiative called KDE Brainstorm. The initiative, which attempts to further decentralize roadmap decision-making by allowing popular ideas to be voted up, is outlined here: 'The KDE team recently announced the KDE Brainstorm initiative. KDE Brainstorm, in practice, works much like Dell's IdeaStorm — community members of all walks of life are invited to chip in their ideas for new and improved features and functions, with the wider community voting on (and fleshing out) these ideas. Ideas that generate enough interest are then reviewed further by developers, who work to make them happen. KDE Brainstorm officially rolled out March 20th, and the response over these first few days has been enthusiastic. In less than 24 hours, over 100 new ideas were proposed.'"
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KDE Project Invites Ideas With Online Brainstorm

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  • *storm (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Tubal-Cain (1289912) on Wednesday March 25, 2009 @03:26AM (#27325909) Journal

    First Dell's IdeaStorm*, then Ubuntu's Brainstorm, And now KDE's Brainstorm. I guess the whole "get ideas from your constituents" thing actually works.
    But why do their names all have a *storm pattern?

    *Actually, I think Lego beat them to it.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by dangitman (862676)

      But why do their names all have a *storm pattern?

      Because it's perfect.

    • by CAIMLAS (41445)

      Well, 'brainstorm' has been around for a while as an English word.

      Though, just wait: Microsoft will buck the trend, trying to be a trend-setting force in the market, and come out with some sort of derivative. Like, maybe, Brainorgy. Or Wetware. Or something like that.

      Though, seriously: I can see popular OS and application vendors making something like this much more common. Not only does it allow users to be more involved in deciding which bugs are the most irritating (on the desktop), or which features sho

      • by dov_0 (1438253)

        Though, just wait: Microsoft will buck the trend, trying to be a trend-setting force in the market, and come out with some sort of derivative. Like, maybe, Brainorgy. Or Wetware. Or something like that.

        No they won't. They'll keep the 'storm' suffix but add something slightly different to the front so they can get a Trademark on it.

  • by Dasher42 (514179) on Wednesday March 25, 2009 @03:34AM (#27325939)

    I wish KDE would adopt at least some of Gnome's Human Interface Guidelines. It'd help everyone if the Linux desktops came together in that respect, at least to ditch those silly Windows-centric "Cancel/Apply/OK" preference dialogues which don't offer any reason not to be done more simply.

    • Windows-centric

      Also, SUSE should drop that Windows-centric Start menu, and Ubuntu needs to drop that Mac-centric panel at the top of the screen. /sarcasm

      Not every UI decision originally implemented by MS* is a bad one.

      *or did MS adopt that from something else?

      "Cancel/Apply/OK" preference dialogues which don't offer any reason not to be done more simply.

      Any suggestions on how it could be done simpler? And will your suggestion allow the same degree of control?
      The only idea I have is to drop the 'Cancel' for being redundant with the 'Close' button in the corner.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Dasher42 (514179)

        Any suggestions on how it could be done simpler? And will your suggestion allow the same degree of control?
        The only idea I have is to drop the 'Cancel' for being redundant with the 'Close' button in the corner.

        Yes. Gnome, XFCE, and OSX do it. You click an option, it takes effect. Don't like it? Just put it back. Optionally, the dialogue can have a revert or defaults button.

        Gnome's gone a bit far in the direction of stripping down features, but overall, I like the uncluttered presentation. I'd love to

        • by Carewolf (581105)

          But that gives you less control. You can not test a feature and easily revert, you have to reselect the option, and if the option is dangerous you are fucked. Doing something stupid is no less stupid just because the gnomes did it first.

          • by jcupitt65 (68879)

            Instant-apply is only used for quick, non-destructive options. You can read the guidelines here:

            http://library.gnome.org/devel/hig-book/stable/windows-utility.html.en

            Do not make the user press an OK or Apply button to make the changes happen, unless either:

            • the change will take more than about one second to apply, in which case applying the change immediately could make the system feel slow or unresponsive, or
            • the changes in the window have to be applied simultaneously to prevent the system entering a
        • by mgkimsal2 (200677)

          How do you "put it back"? I set up a custom theme in Gnome, then I 'try out' a new theme. It's just 'done'. I can't "go back" to my previous one.

        • by segedunum (883035)

          Yes. Gnome, XFCE, and OSX do it. You click an option, it takes effect. Don't like it? Just put it back. Optionally, the dialogue can have a revert or defaults button.

          Instant apply is bullshit, and I've highlighted why it's bullshit. It is not my job to remember the way things were so I can do the job of a cancel button and resetting to defaults doesn't help. I want it back the way I had it before. You know, that's why I use computers, so I don't have to remember. I have no clue how anyone has been hypnotis

      • Any suggestions on how it could be done simpler?

        The Windows way:
        Save?
        Yes / no / cancel.

        The Macintosh way:
        Save?
        Save / don't save / cancel.

        • Any suggestions on how it could be done simpler?

          The Windows way: Save? Yes / no / cancel.

          The Macintosh way: Save? Save / don't save / cancel.

          The KDE way (just checked)
          Save/Cancel

          What is the difference between "don't save" and "cancel", anyway?

          Though I actually agree that the "OK/Apply/cancel" for preference dialogs should be different, namely "Save&Close/Save/Cancel".

          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by WindBourne (631190)
            What is the difference between "don't save" and "cancel", anyway?
            You hit the exit button, and this pops up.
            1. Save means save and continue with exit.
            2. Dont save means do not save, but continue with exit.
            3. Cancel means do not save and STOP EXIT.

            There are many places where there are multiple operations occurring at one time.

            • What is the difference between "don't save" and "cancel", anyway? You hit the exit button, and this pops up.

              1. Save means save and continue with exit.
              2. Dont save means do not save, but continue with exit.
              3. Cancel means do not save and STOP EXIT.

              There are many places where there are multiple operations occurring at one time.

              Poor button texts, then. Kate uses "Save", "Don't save" and "Abort closing" --- much clearer.

              • Poor button texts, then. Kate uses "Save", "Don't save" and "Abort closing" --- much clearer.
                Agreed. But I was simply explaining what it did. The other is still understandable.
        • by spitzak (4019)

          What happened to "exit without saving? yes/no". There are only two buttons. To save & exit you say no, then save, then exit. In the real world this usually works because in most cases if you did not save you realize you also did not finish editing either.

          Vast amounts of software worked this way before the 3-button ones started appearing. Those 3-button ones certainly caused me a lot of pain because the yes/no were somewhat reversed from previous experience and I lost a lot of data by hitting no. However

    • I find Gnome's UI very difficult. I know this is personal preference but I'd hate for KDE to become more like Gnome, I'm only just getting used to KDE 4.2.
    • by segedunum (883035)

      I wish KDE would adopt at least some of Gnome's Human Interface Guidelines.

      Unfortunately, the reason why Gnome came up with a HIG was because:

      1. Gnome has no underlying arhcitecture that lays out a default 'Gnome' application. Menu spacings and various other things are done manually.
      2. Gnome has some pretty severe issues laying out any kind of complex GUI, thus, they had to give a reason why - simplicity.

      KDE is working on a HIG as it goes through the 4.x cycle, but it isn't based on those two reason

  • In principle, KDE's Brainstorm is more ideal for FOSS than Ubuntu's, because KDE is a higher-level project (more FOSS projects draw from KDE than from Ubuntu). An idea implemented by KDE will propagate to all distros that use it, while the only way for an idea at Ubuntu's Brainstorm to reach as far and wide is to send the changes upstream. Something I understand has been an issue with Debian and could be just as contentious with other projects.
  • by Psychotria (953670) on Wednesday March 25, 2009 @03:38AM (#27325949)

    And, maybe it might not be popular mentioning Windows 7 on /., but I really like the feature in Windows 7 beta where you can drag a window to a screen border and it resizes to the screen height and 1/2 the screen width. I imagine that this would be easy to do as a plugin for KDE, but (so far) I haven't been able to find one.

    I think it's great that there's now a place to 'request' features like this instead of on the KDE wiki or emailing the devs directly (hey, they're busy and don't always have time to reply, which I understand). On that note, I do my little bit by submitting src patches and (more often) editing the KDE wikis; I figure that each little bit helps.

    • by baileydau (1037622) on Wednesday March 25, 2009 @06:25AM (#27326907)

      And, maybe it might not be popular mentioning Windows 7 on /., but I really like the feature in Windows 7 beta where you can drag a window to a screen border and it resizes to the screen height and 1/2 the screen width. I imagine that this would be easy to do as a plugin for KDE, but (so far) I haven't been able to find one.

      KDE does have a feature that is similar, but not the same.

      If you right mouse click on the "maximise" button, the window maximises in the VERTICAL direction ONLY. Similarly, you can maximise to full width by clicking with the middle button.

      Unfortunately, I don't know of anything to expand to 1/2 height or width.

    • And, maybe it might not be popular mentioning Windows 7 on /., but I really like the feature in Windows 7 beta...

      Heh, just try comparing Windows 7 unfavorably to KDE or Gnome or even previous versions of the software in a Windows 7 story and you'll get modded a troll like I did. :P

      Anyway, the same feature you liked annoyed me yesterday, but that may just be the old fogey in me. KDE4 annoys me similarly when it shrinks all my windows to postage stamp size at half-alpha which I'm guessing is supposed to allow

    • And, maybe it might not be popular mentioning Windows 7 on /., but I really like the feature in Windows 7 beta where you can drag a window to a screen border and it resizes to the screen height and 1/2 the screen width. I imagine that this would be easy to do as a plugin for KDE, but (so far) I haven't been able to find one.

      Here is the feature request for that very feature on KDE's Bugzilla:
      Resize windows based on drag location [kde.org]

    • In my experience, all that windows witchery* one needs at Windows goes away when you get the options of keeping a window above or behind the others.

      * Cascading them, displaying side by side, etc

    • by spitzak (4019)

      X window managers have had 'maximize vertically only' for years and years now. Usually done by clicking the maximize button with something other than the left mouse button.

  • Ubuntu and KDE with their own idea centers. I have one. Ditch the idea centers and allow ideas to be submitted in the same way as bugs. Then allow bugs to be more freely accessed. Why make two systems when they do pretty much the same thing? Play off the strengths you've already built up. Clearly it wouldn't be hard to make this happen. This is my sole request for KDE/ubuntu/ff/anything with an open bug reporting system.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by lbbros (900904)
      Bug reporting tools are quite inefficient for feature development (and that is why openSUSE has made FATE, for example). Plus you have to deal with duplicates, spam, flames... Our (I'm a KDE forum staff member) idea was to provide pre-screening, and also help users with voting, which reduces the amount of duplicate information and potentially "weeds out" bad ideas.
  • by haeger (85819) on Wednesday March 25, 2009 @03:59AM (#27326043)

    Every time there's a story about KDE a number of people complain, saying it's a failure, that the 4.x-series are dead and so on. Where does all this come from? KDE is one of the high profile open source applications along with gnome, apache, and others so it should be in our common interest to have it succeed.

    Why the need for all the trash-talk? Why not focus on the positive? KDE does some things great, as does gnome and others. Constructive criticism is fine but "KDE4 sucks" is hardly constructive.

    It's not like we need to fight amongst ourselves. There are plenty of other opponents out there that we could focus on. Now we're only weakening our position. I just don't get it.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by cheros (223479)

      Hmm, I don't think it's "hate" as such, more profound disappointment. I can't speak for others, but KDE 3.5 was moving along nicely, was functional and had *heaps* of apps to make it a complete desktop. With Compiz Fusion added it was even damn flash, but the main thing is that it did the job and enough apps were available to create some flexibility.

      Along comes 4 and whammo - I even have trouble finding a decent WiFi manager. All those 3.5 apps I was used to don't have a 4 replacement, and I don't really

      • Hi cheros. I understand your frustration; I loved KDE 3.5.x and used it daily as my primary desktop environment. Along came KDE 4.x and I was shocked. I couldn't work using it. It was complete, unusable, crap. This has been discussed ad infinitum, so I won't really add more. However, since 4.0 was released I've been keeping up with the progress and compile the sources once a week on Saturdays as an excuse to drink beer.

        Although I still don't think it's up-to-scratch, KDE 4.x has improved a lot. Finally, two

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Having spent a lot of time just to get the latest 4.x version, 4.2 running, I'm still very, very disappointed. All that made KDE so good is gone. Keyboard shortcuts are more limited now and occasionally don't work at all, file management is much worse, the launch menu is primitive compared to what it was (and whilst Lancelot can replace it, it isn't as good as the 3.x version was), plenty of useful, small apps no longer work like they should and finally, it's still quite buggy. I do wonder what they were th

          • I cannot argue with your well presented points. You are, of course, correct. KDE pre 4.x was, to me, a great environment to work in. Then came 4.x and, well, to put it bluntly: it was broken. In many respects it still is broken. Your points are valid, strong and hard to dispute. In short, you're correct. I guess the stance that I am taking is that the decision has been made, and the changes implemented (or, more truthfully, partially or attempted to be implemented).

            Is it really a good idea to make so much from scratch just so that anybody that has just written "hello world" can proceed to easily write a widget, which sits on your desktop and says "hello world, the weather today is..." The KDE developers have strange priorities.

            In many ways I agree with what you're sayi

          • Take back my first reply to you Anonymous Coward. Your points are 100% correct. I took a defensive position and after pondering it for a bit I see your point(s). Despite the new goals that I inferred or guessed and that, in my original reply, I have a sinking feeling now. In light of your points my counter-points seem hollow.

          • by wisty (1335733)

            I vote they copy Twitter for KDE5.

          • Furthermore, file management doesn't work well anymore - I was used to being able to move icons in windows but now they all align to a grid no matter what, which sort of defeats the purpose of a graphical file manager.

            Here is the feature request for that issue:
            Option to not align icons to grid [kde.org]

          • by pxc (938367)

            That widget is not a KNotes replacement. KNotes has a KDE4 version and has even since 4.0. There are a number of widgets relating to sticky notes, one of the coolest I have running when the screensaver loads. It asks a passerby to "leave a note" for me. A user can enter in their note, and then click "send" and then when I log in, I have a new KNote sitting on my desktop, from them. The note is saved, just like other KNotes.

            How are keyboard shortcuts "more limited"? I know that I noticed that on my laptop so

      • by baileydau (1037622) on Wednesday March 25, 2009 @06:01AM (#27326745)

        Hmm, I don't think it's "hate" as such, more profound disappointment. I can't speak for others, but KDE 3.5 was moving along nicely, was functional and had *heaps* of apps to make it a complete desktop. With Compiz Fusion added it was even damn flash, but the main thing is that it did the job and enough apps were available to create some flexibility.

        Those KDE 3.5 applications you like still exist, they didn't go away. You can use them with KDE 4.x, 3.5, Gnome, or many other desktop environments.

        Along comes 4 and whammo - I even have trouble finding a decent WiFi manager. All those 3.5 apps I was used to don't have a 4 replacement, and I don't really want to be a whining git asking the developers of every single app to upgrade their code (which is AFAIK not that easy either) - besides, I don't have the time.

        So use the WiFi manager you like. Personally, I use KnetworkManager. I believe that is a KDE 3.x application.

        So 4.0 was for me going from a functional 3.5 desktop to a black hole. I won't bitch about it, I occasionally check in and see if the situation has improved. So far, the answer is "not really", so I'll use Gnome of a lighter desktop.

        Sorry, this is an attitude I don't understand. If you like KDE 3.5, but don't like KDE 4.x, why go to Gnome (or other desktop), just use KDE 3.5, it's still available. It seems like people are cutting their noses off to spite their faces (that is assuming are actually changing their desktop and not trolling)

        It also means that I can no longer wean people off Windows because KDE 4 just doesn't cut it yet as a replacement.

        So why not show them KDE 3.5 instead.

        A quote from the KDE website:
        "KDE 3.5 is the more mature version of KDE. For more conservative users, this is the recommended version of KDE."

        In summary, to me, going to KDE 4 was as much an upgrade to 3.5 as Vista was an upgrade to XP..

        What I'd like is simply what 3.5 was offering, stable compiz fusion graphics added (flashiness aside, a cube is actually quite a good working desktop model from a functionality point of view) and a complete array of apps form printing, WiFi (well, OK, that still sucks in seven ways to Sunday on Linux IMHO).

        Having said that, I'll probably buy a Mac instead. Functionality without the risk or hassle..

        So, why not stick with KDE 3.5 for the time being??? You aren't being forced to go to 4.x.

        Personally, I now use KDE 4.2 on all of my machines (both home and work). I really like the "Cover Switch" alt-tab tool.

        I tried KDE 4.0 and 4.1 and didn't like them. I stayed with KDE 3.5. I found KDE 4.1.3 OK and made the switch.

        • by ChienAndalu (1293930) on Wednesday March 25, 2009 @06:49AM (#27327087)

          Because 3.5 isn't available in many repositories anymore and bugs for 3.5 aren't being fixed because efforts concentrate on kde 4.

          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by baileydau (1037622)

            Because 3.5 isn't available in many repositories anymore and bugs for 3.5 aren't being fixed because efforts concentrate on kde 4.

            Which of the major distros don't carry KDE 3.5 any more?? I use openSUSE and it is most certainly available.

            Looking at http://www.kde.org/download/#v3.5 [kde.org] there appear to be binary packages for Fedora, Kubuntu, Mandriva, openSUSE

            Whilst a lot of effort is going into KDE 4.x, the 3.5 line still seems to be worked on.

            • Because 3.5 isn't available in many repositories anymore and bugs for 3.5 aren't being fixed because efforts concentrate on kde 4.

              Which of the major distros don't carry KDE 3.5 any more?? I use openSUSE and it is most certainly available.

              Looking at http://www.kde.org/download/#v3.5 [kde.org] there appear to be binary packages for Fedora, Kubuntu, Mandriva, openSUSE

              Whilst a lot of effort is going into KDE 4.x, the 3.5 line still seems to be worked on.

              Actually, they have a point. It has little to do with KDE, but with the Qt 3.x series, which has been discontinued and is basically unmaintained. Noone has stepped up to maintain it, and thus distributors are loath to carry packages that depends on qt 3.5. kdelibs4 (aka kde 3) are still maintained, but in bugfixing mode.

          • Because 3.5 isn't available in many repositories anymore...

            How exactly is that the KDE developers' fault?

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Ash-Fox (726320)

          Note, I am not the grand father poster.

          Those KDE 3.5 applications you like still exist, they didn't go away. You can use them with KDE 4.x, 3.5, Gnome, or many other desktop environments.

          I can't. I set the global hot key in any kde3 application running in KDE4.x and the hot key doesn't work, preventing me from using the applications.

          So use the WiFi manager you like. Personally, I use KnetworkManager. I believe that is a KDE 3.x application.

          Kubuntu actually, not KDE. Thus, not available on all distros.

          A quot

          • Kubuntu actually, not KDE. Thus, not available on all distros.

            Didn't stop Kubuntu from adopting KDE4 as a default for all new releases without giving the option to use KDE3 on said releases.

            Considering I'm using the latest Kubuntu version to get updated applications, I am unfortunately - what sucks is that KDE4 isn't finished yet and they're pushing it as a full desktop system.

            I'm sensing a theme here, that perhaps you need to reexamine your distribution of choice.

            • by Ash-Fox (726320)

              I'm sensing a theme here, that perhaps you need to reexamine your distribution of choice.

              Most distros are pissing me off at the moment. I still want the vast repositories that Ubuntu provides without the non-sense of portage package hell. I don't have much choice in the issue, unfortunately.

          • by segedunum (883035)

            I can't. I set the global hot key in any kde3 application running in KDE4.x and the hot key doesn't work, preventing me from using the applications.

            That sounds like an excuse not to use them rather than a reason why you 'can't'. Besides, I've used KDE 3 applications in KDE 4 and I don't see that at all.

            Kubuntu actually, not KDE. Thus, not available on all distros.

            Don't use Kubuntu then. It's hardly the KDE project's fault for that as you're trying to insinuate. Blame the Ubuntu edict on KDE 4, because the

            • by Ash-Fox (726320)

              That sounds like an excuse not to use them rather than a reason why you 'can't'. Besides, I've used KDE 3 applications in KDE 4 and I don't see that at all.

              I do, and with applications like Amarok, it's crucial since I can't go about switching in and out of full screen applications to change a song etc.

              Don't use Kubuntu then. It's hardly the KDE project's fault for that as you're trying to insinuate. Blame the Ubuntu edict on KDE 4, because they totally misunderstood what needed to be done, particularly wher

              • by segedunum (883035)

                I do, and with applications like Amarok, it's crucial since I can't go about switching in and out of full screen applications to change a song etc.

                Still sounds like an excuse.

                There honestly isn't really any better KDE distros out there in my opinion.

                You haven't looked far and it obviously can't be that good given what you've described. OpenSuse is a far better KDE distro and I'd suggest you try something that has a chance of working first before pinning various things as KDE bugs.

                Believe it or not, I'm no

                • by Ash-Fox (726320)

                  Still sounds like an excuse.

                  Facts are facts, it hot keys aren't working for me in KDE3 applications under a KDE4 desktop and that has prevented me from using KDE3 applications under a KDE4 desktop.

                  You haven't looked far and it obviously can't be that good given what you've described. OpenSuse is a far better KDE distro and I'd suggest you try something that has a chance of working first before pinning various things as KDE bugs.

                  OpenSuSE doesn't have a large repository selection like Kubuntu, despite the fac

      • by rsidd (6328)

        When did you last use KDE4? I've been running KDE 4.2 since a little before its release, and all the applications I need work including a pretty good network-manager plasmoid; and I find kwin4 *way* superior to compiz-fusion. The effects are well thought out and actually useful. (And yes, it has a cube, but that's just eyecandy.) Before January I was running gnome+compiz-fusion, for pretty much the reasons you say.

      • Apple, like windows, ALL have their issues when doing major changes. 3 to 4 was a major jump, along the lines 1 to 2 and 2 to 3 (go figure; MAJOR VERSION CHANGE). 4 IS having some issues. Not all the apps have been (or even will be) ported. BUT things WILL settle down and more importantly, progress will continue. I can understand your not moving ppl to 4 yet. I am currently typing this on kubuntu jaunty, and see issues with KDE as well as the distro (though it IS an alpha). I hate the way certain things are
        • by cheros (223479)

          I mentioned I occasionally check in and have a look (usually I grab a newly launched distro like Kubuntu or OpenSuSE and see if I can get it to run on my not-so-special hardware) - that's install, config, experiment, sigh, remove.

          The problem is that I have almost 2 decades worth of Microsoft experience where they have been doing the same thing - always promising the new version will be faster/safer/more functional/less buggy/usable (the boldest claim of all). And it's still crap..

          At least with KDE you can

      • Is there a way of packing 3.5 kde (while removing the 4.0) with the latest version of ~distro~ linux.
        I am not that strong in redoing the overall flavor of a distro, leaving it "as is" when I install linux...so my question stems from wanting to know how to if it can be done at all, thinking of latest ubuntu or red hat etc.

      • My biggest complaint with KDE4.x is the loss of support for multiple X screens. My configuration is 3 monitiors on 2 NVidia cards. 2 of the monitors are configured as XScreen 0 with TwinView, and the other is on the second card configured as XScreen 1. KDE 3.5 handled this perfectly and I had the desktop spread across all 3 monitors. KDE 4.X doesn't have support for multiple XScreens (and last time I looked nobody was working on it).

      • by Qwavel (733416)

        Let me answer that from the perspective of a Windows user, keeping in mind that there are lots of Windows users and they are the most likely new converts to KDE.

        KDE 3.5 was not available on Windows (though some Qt apps were). KDE 4 is.

        I think it is quite an achievement that the entire desktop is truly portable. Not an achievement in the noble sense, but in the practical sense of vastly increasing its potential audience.

        If I wanted to convert a Windows user to Linux I would start by installing KDE 4.2 on t

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Lord Lode (1290856)
      Because it really is something to hate. That's why. I worked 2 months with KDE 4.1 and then had to install KDE 3.5 again simply because it allows me to work much better and faster. I'm normally not the guy who goes around changing his linux all the time, but the fact that I actually took the time to go back to 3.5 and that I was incredibly happy when it booted back up and I was immediatly more productive, does that prove that something is wrong with KDE 4.X, at least for some people? Yes, I hate it.
    • by penguinchris (1020961) <[moc.liamg] [ta] [sirhcniugnep]> on Wednesday March 25, 2009 @05:24AM (#27326525) Homepage

      Agreed - I had my doubts about KDE 4 and thought it was terrible when I tried the 4.0 and 4.1 releases. However, now I've been using 4.2 since it came out, and when I recently set up another computer I tried to go back to 3.5 (it's a netbook and I figured 3.5 would be faster) and I couldn't. I got used to the improvements in 4.x and don't want to go back.

      Which is not to say there aren't still features in 3.5 not in 4.x yet that I dearly miss. KDE's not quite there yet and I can see why many still wouldn't want to switch. But despite their gaff with 4.0 - which I think really was a bad move - 4.x is coming along nicely and in time most people will realize this and start using it.

      My point is that the "KDE 4 sucks" talk is the natural result of people resisting change, combined with some pretty big mistakes the KDE devs made (the 4.0 release and the many still-missing features from 3.5, for example.) It'll die out within the next couple of major KDE 4 releases, I suspect.

      • Agreed. I've been running 4.2 on Kubuntu Intrepid in the fishbowl of VirtualBox (needed to do video editing with Kdenlive) and it's almost there. There are some things they've done with the 4.0 series that have me scratching my head--the panel clock f'rinstance: why did they extract all the functionality into four or five differnet clocks when I could choose a setting from a drop down list on the clock applet? Silly things like that. I, too, will wait for the next major release.
    • Look. This happens ALL the time, with all projects. You have the window fan bois combined with the GNOME noobies, etc, all of which are far more interested in not having competition. Ignore them. It happens to ALL platforms. In addition, some of what can be taken for trolls are actually not, but grips coming from ppl who want to operate outside of the process. The simple fact is, that some of these are legitimate. Not a problem. Some will take these ideas and run them back to the group.
    • I'd like to know this myself. I've been using KDE 4 since its initial .0 release and think it's the greatest thing since sliced bread. Do I bash on other people's desktops because I don't like them? No, never, I recognize that it's "not my thing" and move on. It's like some of the Gnome zealots that keep trying to beat into me that all non-Gnome desktops are trash, it's just silly.

      This is FOSS, land of choice. If you don't like KDE 4 to my knowledge KDE 3.5.x still works nicely, there's wonderful de
  • For those that don't know what I'm talking about, it's the yellow thing in the top right of the desktop, used for some sort of menu button.

    Anyway, there is no obvious way to get rid of it, not even a config file that can be edited - the only option being to download a third party add-on.

    Seriously, is it so hard from a programming perspective to add a "Hide" option?

    It's the only thing that annoys me about KDE (apart from the system tray icon background issue, which I think is being worked on).

    • by lbbros (900904) on Wednesday March 25, 2009 @05:42AM (#27326625) Homepage
      The Plasma developers have already spoken about it. And you *can* get rid of it by using a custom desktop containment. openSUSE does that, for example, although personally I don't mind the cashew (which is also way smaller in trunk, BTW).
      • by Hatta (162192)

        The Plasma developers have already spoken about it.

        What did they say?

        And you *can* get rid of it by using a custom desktop containment.

        How do I do that?

        This informative post is not very informative.

        • by QCompson (675963)

          What did they say?

          That they refuse to provide an option to remove it, and that others are welcome to.

          How do I do that?

          There's an applet or plasmoid or whatever that you can download (from kde-look.org I believe) that allows you to hide the cashew. Not a very elegant solution.

          Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but can't you access the cashew config by right clicking the desktop? I'm not sure why it is needed, and seems to piss a lot of people off.

  • Hey KDE guys,
    Howsabout getting KDE4 feature-complete with KDE3 first? Then again, it doesn't really matter much to me anymore, I've already abandoned KDE4 for XFCE at work and GNOME/Ubuntu on my toy Aspire One at home..

    Still, I'll miss having the konqi run command applet in kpanel, whipping off "gg:" and "man:/" commands there was super l33t and efficient.. Frankly, I only needed a few icons, the run command applet, the lock/logout ap

  • I would like it to get rid of the modal dialog boxes, especially the one for knoqueror which makes it a pain to use for web browsing.

    Maybe the could implement a modal dialog stack which would stack them up unobtrusively on the side some where, but not so that they can steal focus.

The bomb will never go off. I speak as an expert in explosives. -- Admiral William Leahy, U.S. Atomic Bomb Project

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