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Microsoft Suffers Leaks, Lagging Sales Numbers As They Look Forward To Windows 8 386

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the expect-it-to-get-much-worse dept.
nandemoari writes "With only a few weeks until Microsoft's Windows 7 Release Candidate 1 (RC1) is released, Microsoft is already looking for people to help with Windows 8. An April 14th job ad posted by Microsoft says the upcoming version of Windows will have new features like cluster support and support for one way replication. Apparently the Windows 8 kernel is being reworked to provide dramatic performance improvements. Windows 8 will also include innovative features that, according to Microsoft, will revolutionize file access in branch offices." Relatedly, several users tell us that both 32 and 64-bit versions of the Windows 7 release candidate have been leaked into the wild via p2p networks. The current leaked version shows little change beyond bug fixes, so it would seem what you see is what you get. This all comes as Microsoft posts quarterly sales that have fallen for the first time in the company's 23-year history. Seeing a 6% drop in revenue and a 32% drop in earnings, some within the Redmond giant expect the downward trend to continue.
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Microsoft Suffers Leaks, Lagging Sales Numbers As They Look Forward To Windows 8

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  • Buh? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by sexconker (1179573) on Friday April 24, 2009 @05:55PM (#27707263)

    How is this a leak? Or news?

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      How is this a leak?

      Because the RC hasn't been officially released.

    • Re:Buh? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by davester666 (731373) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:19PM (#27707533) Journal

      Neither. It has been posted prior to every previous OS release by Microsoft, replacing only the current and next OS names.

      In particular, they include this statement every time: "provide dramatic performance improvements"

      And is "revolutionize file access in branch offices" the filesystem MS promised for Vista, or is that still DOA?

      • Yeah, the improved file system didn't even make it into 7. Ugh.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by sexconker (1179573)

        WinFS is likely dead and buried.

        The branch thing is their method of caching files on a machine on the local network.

        Apparently 7 does it very well, so I don't know what 8 is hyping it up for.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by tepples (727027)

          The branch thing is their method of caching files on a machine on the local network.

          Apparently 7 does it very well, so I don't know what 8 is hyping it up for.

          The point is that by the time Windows 8 is out, it will have become commercially acceptable for an app to require services that were introduced in Windows 7.

      • Re:Buh? (Score:5, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 24, 2009 @07:13PM (#27708021)

        And is "revolutionize file access in branch offices" the filesystem MS promised for Vista

        Microsoft never promised a new filesystem. WinFS was an abstraction layer running atop NTFS.

        • Re:Buh? (Score:5, Informative)

          by neokushan (932374) on Friday April 24, 2009 @07:33PM (#27708175)

          Mod Parent Up.
          This lovely little tidbit of information is completely correct and it always gets iterated every single time someone bashes Microsoft over WinFS. It's not a file system. It never was. And it's not dead, it's now part of SQL server under a different name.

          But somehow, people don't get this. It's been years since it's been "dropped" from Vista (presumably because it's not actually all that useful after all) yet people still harp on about it.
          I don't know why the message isn't getting through: It's not a file system. It's not abandoned. It's not a big deal.
          Until it gets through, all we can really do is mod up the people that constantly point this out =\

      • Re:Buh? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by J Story (30227) on Friday April 24, 2009 @08:42PM (#27708637) Homepage

        And is "revolutionize file access in branch offices" the filesystem MS promised for Vista, or is that still DOA?

        I would hope by now that people are able to see through this as yet another defense against encroaching Free and Open Source solutions. If this "feature" is actually delivered, any bets that it will not play well with Samba? Given Microsoft's history, there is every reason to suspect poison in every Microsoft offering.

      • Re:Buh? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by David Gerard (12369) <slashdot@davidgerar d . c o.uk> on Friday April 24, 2009 @09:13PM (#27708819) Homepage

        Every press story about Windows since 1994 [today.com] reads:

        I am so excited about $NEXT_VERSION of Windows. It will go beyond just solving all of the problems with $CURRENT_VERSION, it will be an entirely new paradigm. Forget about security problems, those are all fixed in $NEXT_VERSION. And they're finally ridding themselves of $ANCIENT_LEGACY_STUFF.

        Also, there'll be $DATABASE_FILESYSTEM. It'll be awesome!

        I wonder how $NEXT_VERSION will compare to $NEXT_NEXT_VERSION.

  • Leaks are the cool way to release news now days. I just don't ask from where it leaked (ewww).
  • by nurb432 (527695) on Friday April 24, 2009 @05:58PM (#27707289) Homepage Journal

    So thats saying that what isn't out yet is already being replaced, so why should i upgrade.

    How about just make something that works?

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by sexconker (1179573)

      Because they'd rather spend tons on R&D, marketing, support, etc. for something people don't want to buy (Vista, Windows 7) than to continue to press discs for something people do want to buy (XP).

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Jurily (900488)

        Because they'd rather spend tons on R&D, marketing, support, etc. for something people don't want to buy (Vista, Windows 7) than to continue to press discs for something people do want to buy (XP).

        Don't forget beating hardware manufacturers into submission.

      • by x2A (858210) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:23PM (#27707575)

        I want Windows 7... kernel... I don't want its shell (explorer et al) though. The idea of moving to an interface that does things differently, I don't have a huge aversion to. The idea of moving to an interface that can't do the things I can do now in Win2003... well that's just plain silly.

        • by Chabo (880571)

          I have very little experience with Win7 (just a small amount of time in a VM hosted inside WinXP on a system with only 1GB of DDR ram).

          What's changed in the Win7 interface that reduces usability?

        • by drsmithy (35869)

          The idea of moving to an interface that can't do the things I can do now in Win2003...

          For example ?

        • by Korin43 (881732)
          That's how I felt about KDE 4 when it first came out. As time goes on it's turning out to be a much nicer/cleaner interface overall. Maybe this will happen with Windows 7? (Windows Vista is KDE 4.0, Windows 7 is KDE 4.2?)
    • by Chabo (880571) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:35PM (#27707677) Homepage Journal

      I'm not sure there's a single industry in which the average business puts out a product without at least starting to plan the next one.

      • by jmorris42 (1458) * <jmorris@bea u . org> on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:58PM (#27707877)

        > I'm not sure there's a single industry in which the average business
        > puts out a product without at least starting to plan the next one.

        I'm sure you are correct. However I'm pretty sure this is the first time Microsoft has hinted about V+2 before V+1 shipped. Up to now the cycle has been:

        1. Release. This is THE product you must have. It fixed everything you hated about V-1 and is just packed full of awesome.

        2. As customers actually buy V and find it creates as many problems as it fixed, even after the first service release announce the upcoming V+1 in development. Release some internal builds and screenshots to the tame tech media to begin working the hype up. Yup, V+1 is going to be the bomb, every feature you could possibly want is going to be in this puppy, it will finally be secure and you will even have whiter teeth!

        3. As release date passes without a release start removing features. Make sure all the pirates and tech media have a recent build. Ensure all reviews are between the upcoming release and competing shipping products to suck out their oxygen. Nah, who needs NDS when Active directory is coming any day now and will rule!

        4. PROFIT! ; Goto 1

        This time Windows 7 isn't even being hyped as more than a corrective for the stuff people hated in Vista, no real new features. The new features are now being hyped for V+2. Which is only more evidence that 7 is just Mojave/Vista SE.

    • by noidentity (188756) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:36PM (#27707685)
      I'm still waiting on Mojave. There was a demo last year but they have kept quiet on its progress, kind of like Apple does. I can't wait!
    • Just about every technology company has people working on products designs more than one revision out. This is not new, anyone surprised by that fact is just being flagrantly naive.

    • Firefox 3.5 isn't out yet, and they are already working on FF 3.6. There are things being worked on outside the main kernel tree that will not be released for several more kernel versions.

  • Trash talk (Score:5, Insightful)

    by 200_success (623160) on Friday April 24, 2009 @05:58PM (#27707301)
    It's vaporware. Announced features tend get dropped from Windows during the development process. Don't believe anything from Microsoft until it's released.
    • It's just a floater (Score:4, Interesting)

      by drinkypoo (153816) <martin.espinoza@gmail.com> on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:05PM (#27707355) Homepage Journal

      Almost, but not quite. Microsoft just ran clustering up the flagpole to see who would get excited.

    • Fuck yeah. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by SanityInAnarchy (655584) <ninja@slaphack.com> on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:07PM (#27707379) Journal

      This all comes as Microsoft posts quarterly sales that have fallen for the first time in the company's 23-year history.

      This is a perfect opportunity for trash talk! Suck on failure, Microsoft! Sales looking a little limp this quarter? I guess that's why they call it both micro and soft!

      Heh. More seriously, as Joel points out [joelonsoftware.com]:

      Microsoft has an incredible amount of cash money in the bank and is still incredibly profitable. It has a long way to fall. It could do everything wrong for a decade before it started to be in remote danger, and you never know... they could reinvent themselves as a shaved-ice company at the last minute.

      It's good to see a hint that this fall might finally be starting, but even in this economy, it will be a long time before Microsoft dies.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by drinkypoo (153816)

        If inflation keeps going the way it's going, any actual cash reserves are a big mistake... and it could easily get worse.

        • Re:Fuck yeah. (Score:5, Informative)

          by Swanktastic (109747) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:48PM (#27707801)

          They don't have large actual cash reserves. That is just slang for liquid accounts. They have a whole team of people who sit around forecast the exact amount of cash necessary to do things like make payroll and A/P at certain times. Then, they manage a whole slew of really low risk investments that come due around the time they need the cash. The rate on really low risk investments investments is by defintion the expected rate of inflation for that period + the time value of money. It's not hard to find investments like TIPS (Treasury Inflation protected securities) that guarantee the proper rate of return.

      • Re:Fuck yeah. (Score:5, Interesting)

        by jmorris42 (1458) * <jmorris@bea u . org> on Friday April 24, 2009 @07:11PM (#27708003)

        > More seriously, as Joel points out:

        Joel is wrong. A few years ago he was right but he obviously hasn't looked at Microsoft's latest balance sheet. They blew through the cash horde paying us stockholders dividends to keep us from going after em with pitchforks. Used to be they carried zero debt on their books, not anymore.

        Go look it up, it is shocking how fast they went from more money than the Pope in Rome to a normal profitable company. And now the recession is upon them, netbooks are encroaching on their fat margins and there isn't much excitement in corporate America to engage in a mass hardware refresh to get Windows 7.

        The computing landscape is about to change, the old guard who built the industry is retiring/dying off and things are about to make the shift from high flying growth to stable basic industry.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by David Gerard (12369)
          Yep. I was almost disappointed when they didn't buy Yahoo! - that really would have been 2 plus 2 equals 1. "We blew 40 billion, but at least we switched FreeBSD for NT, 'cos that worked so well for Hotmail! [today.com]"
      • a dead Microsoft? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by falconwolf (725481) <falconsoaring_2000 @ y a h o o . com> on Friday April 24, 2009 @07:17PM (#27708049)

        It's good to see a hint that this fall might finally be starting, but even in this economy, it will be a long time before Microsoft dies.

        I'll be at the start of any "I hate Microsoft, they're evil!" line, but I DO NOT want to see MS die. We need more competition not less.

        Falcon

        • by mangu (126918) on Friday April 24, 2009 @08:20PM (#27708525)

          I DO NOT want to see MS die. We need more competition not less.

          Well, I'd say that Microsoft dying would be a *huge* step towards more competition...

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Stormwatch (703920)

          I'll be at the start of any "I hate Microsoft, they're evil!" line, but I DO NOT want to see MS die. We need more competition not less.

          Taking in account that Microsoft destroyed competitors by unethical methods rather than superior products... hell yeah, I'd love to see them die.

        • by SanityInAnarchy (655584) <ninja@slaphack.com> on Friday April 24, 2009 @09:46PM (#27709017) Journal

          We need more competition not less.

          If you assume Apple would fill that void, I wholeheartedly agree. In their own way, they are worse than Microsoft.

          However, if Linux filled that void, that is actually much better. Have you not noticed?

          There is competition on every level on Linux, from the kernel down.

          On the kernel level, you can have Linux, Solaris, BSD, Darwin, even HURD.

          If you choose Linux, you can use ext3, xfs, jfs, or reiserfs -- and those are just the ones off the top of my head that are reasonably stable and fit for desktop use.

          There are alternate init systems -- everything from old-school sysvinit to Apple's launchd to Gentoo's weird dependency system to Ubuntu's upstart.

          There are alternate shells -- bash, dash, csh, ksh, rush, emacs...

          There have even been a few attempts at alternate X servers, though X.org remains pretty key for now.

          There are alternate desktop environments -- GNOME, KDE, XFCE, etc -- and alternate window managers which can be used within those, or by themselves -- metacity, compiz, kwin, fluxbox, ratpoison, windowmaker, fvwm, twm... Or none at all.

          There are alternate file browsers -- Gentoo, Nautilus, Konqueror, Dolphin, Midnight Commander, bash...

          There are alternate web browsers -- Firefox, Konqueror, Epiphany, Galeon, Opera...

          There are alternate package managers -- apt, rpm, portage, ports...

          And there are alternate distros to wrap it all up.

          Trust me, if Ubuntu ever gains a dominant position, that would be more consumer choice, and more competition, not less. The most obvious reason? I'd probably be using Kubuntu.

          And that's ignoring the reasons competition doesn't matter as much, for open source things...

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by bryan1945 (301828)

            I calculate the number of permutations on JUST the name variations you provided. It came out to 172,800 different combinations.

            This is going to make computing better? Sure as heck not easier. "Hello, help desk"..."ok, I need for you to tell me the following 35 different things..."

            I know it's fun to play with the tech, I do it, but money comes from businesses. The one thing that might be able to push *nix, bsd onto corporate desktops would be a widespread standard, the complete opposite of your points.

    • by BSAtHome (455370)

      It's vaporware.

      Although very cynical at first glance, it has a lot of merit. Many product announcements included a lot of hot air and were dropped as the release schedule came closer. The only problem is that the same behaviour goes into the "cry wolf" direction. These feature-news-drops are not taken as serious as before. This makes me wonder what part of the drop in earnings can be attributed to lost credibility.

  • point of reference (Score:5, Informative)

    by je ne sais quoi (987177) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:08PM (#27707387)
    Point of reference: Apple Q2 sales of Macs fell 3% [allheadlinenews.com] as opposed to MS' 6%, but ipods and iphones were still growing, giving the company a net profit. Couple this to the data over the last year or so showing that usage share of windows operating systems has been eroding a 1-3% a year [hitslink.com] for the last four years, it appears that microsoft seems to be losing, but it's slow going. It could easily turn around with a new successful operating system by MS.
    • by footnmouth (665025) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:17PM (#27707507) Homepage
      I have a great memory, and to be honest it's a massive PITA. I can remember when people wanted MS to succeed against the might and nastiness of Big Blue (IBM). Now it's all comers against MS, with Apple and Google getting most of the plaudits and building an empire. If it continues, Apple and Google will be the big bad corporations in a couple of years and us, the nerds, will either fondly remember "good old MS" or hang on hard to a new trend / company.

      Or Linux will be ready for the desktop :-) *

      * I troll, I troll, I'm typing this on my Centos machine
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by elrous0 (869638) *
      Even *if* Apple did become a dominant player in the OS market, there is no reason to believe they would be any less abusive of that position than MS has been.
      • by rsborg (111459) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:30PM (#27707623) Homepage

        Even *if* Apple did become a dominant player in the OS market, there is no reason to believe they would be any less abusive of that position than MS has been.

        Why do we need a new "dominant" player? Why can't we just have a plethora of OSs that inter-operate at a basic level and let users and companies cater to one or all of the preferred OSs?

        The best thing in the world of software will happen when no one company has a stranglehold on innovation... take a look at the web for example... lots of innovation until IE dominated, then Firefox broke the domination and now you have IE, FF, Chrome, Safari, Opera and a whole host of other browsers that adhere standards (for the most part) and web developers write to those standards (and tweak for specific browsers)... innovation is picking up pace again.

        To come back to your point, yes Apple would make as evil a monopolist as Microsoft, but I'd prefer if they all had to compete for my $$.

        • Because the standards are never standard. No one ever actually perfectly adheres to the standards and that makes development suck and users suffer. Even worse, people add on to the standards and then developers actually use that crap that's been tacked on - Before you know it you're locked in just like you were before. That and you have an awesomely splintered codebase where you've got custom code all over the place to take advantage of the "enhancements" one OS has that another doesn't.

          Last but not least
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          To come back to your point, yes Apple would make as evil a monopolist as Microsoft, but I'd prefer if they all had to compete for my $$.

          A monopolist of what? Hardware? So Dell, HP, Acer, etc. are going to be swept away? Or Software? Wait, what will we run that Apple software on?

          If Microsoft goes belly up, and Apple doesn't license clones, the other computer manufacturers will throw so much money/talent/marketing at *BSD/Linux that it won;t be fun (unless, of course, you're the target of such spending).

    • by the_humeister (922869) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:35PM (#27707679)

      Despite MS sales dropping 6% and profits dropping ~30%, they're still somehow the 3rd most profitable company in the world according to Fortune. They're ahead of even GE! So who's ahead of them? Exxon and Chevron.

    • It could easily turn around with a new successful operating system by MS

      They could however, there are some key things against them. An example would be the cost advantages of linux, with it being good enough for most uses. You may say so what but there are some ARM based computers in the works (see below) that can be sold for $200 dollars at profitable margins (whether they will be is another matter). Keep in mind that netbooks if cheap enough sell with Linux on them, as 2008 showed (with more windows shar

  • Feature freeze? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by RiotingPacifist (1228016) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:10PM (#27707417)

    Isn't it a good thing that they are concentrating on the bugs from the betas, instead of adding features? Perhaps users of the final release wont feel like beta testers this time?

    I'm no ms fan but they seam to be doing it right this time, move feature work and innovation to windows 8, while a 'stable' branch of the code is finalized for release.

    • by x2A (858210)

      In the OSS world it's called "release early, release often" (example [mysql.com])

      But hey, one mans 'terrorism' is another mans 'shock and awe'.

    • Sort of, but if all you are doing is fixing bugs, what's the point of having a new version? Why not just stay with your old version, which people kind of like?

      The main difference I see between Microsoft and Apple is that Microsoft is directionless. A new way of sharing files? That's so 1990. It's as if they are looking for something to add to their system, because they know they need to do something! Contrast that with the feature set for Apple's Snow Leopard [wikipedia.org]. if you look at the list, you see clearl
  • Aren't leaks usually accompanied by rats leaving a sinking ship [softpedia.com]? If that is the case, then these leaks must have started a long time ago...
  • Windows 2000 (Score:4, Interesting)

    by bonch (38532) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:12PM (#27707437)

    Windows 2000--still the best version they ever made. Simple, clean, and snappy. Try it on a modern PC. It's so wonderfully fast with an interface that stays out of the way. If Windows 2000 had supported my laptop in 2002, I wouldn't have made the jump to XP. I would have used Windows 2000 for many years.

    Windows 7 looks like Vista with an OS X Dock. I can't stand Aero, and there doesn't appear to be any refinements to it, so that's disappointing. The cloning of OS X's Dock and window management behavior is another amusingly obvious ripoff that Microsoft and its supporters will deny (the common talking point appears to be that the inspiration was Windows 1.0, not OS X). The option for the classic Start menu has been removed. I really dislike Vista's Start menu and how you scroll inside it to get to things. Thankfully, the search field is a faster, better launcher.

    Snow Leopard will be fun to compare to Windows 7. While Microsoft has been moving in a direction of adding more visual flair with each release, Apple has been removing flair from OS X. Right now, it almost resembles NexTStep's dark gray. Once they replace the harsh, blue gel scrollbars with iTunes' clean ones, I'll be really happy staring at my screen all day.

    • Re:Windows 2000 (Score:5, Informative)

      by x2A (858210) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:43PM (#27707745)

      2003 dude, all the way. Switch to windows classic (start menu, taskbar, window decoration, folder views) and disable the 'themes' service which seems to intercept graphics calls and the result is snappier than 2000, esp with boot/shutdown times taken into consideration (with concurrent service start/stopping that came in 2001's XP).

      Throw a couple of UI enhancements on (launchy [sourceforge.net], freelaunchbar [freelaunchbar.com]) and you're away. Nothin beats it. One of my problems with 7ista is that you can't create a second bar on the screen (eg, add quicklaunch toolbar, and try drag it to the top or side of the screen. You now have a new bar, great for adding an address toolbar, a freelaunchbar, website bookmarks etc). I don't understand the mentality behind removing functionality.

  • Here we go again (Score:2, Redundant)

    by WiiVault (1039946)
    Every time MS starts up the hype train they start promising the world. Total kernel rewrites, new filesystems, fancy features. Then over the course of the following years they begin to slowly peal them back until we get what is a shadow of the initial promise. Now they are not the only ones who do this (I'm looking at you Sony), but it has become so predictable I don't even listen to what they say until beta. Even then things often don't make it to final release.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by CrystalX (1299317)

      Keep in mind that in this case we are extrapolating features from an MS job posting, not from an official press release. Therefore this isn't exactly hype we're looking at here - but rather internal plans which may change as time progresses.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by MrEricSir (398214)

      I'm sure they'll have WinFS ready by Windows 30.

  • by omar.sahal (687649) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:14PM (#27707477) Homepage Journal
    We will see if this trend continues, it could get much worse before windows 7 is due. If as planned a number of companies, such as Pegatron release [engadget.com] in June as planned.
    Just imagine the effect if these cheap netbooks sell in numbers, ARM will be the new hotness as far as business would be concerned. They would be cheap (actually at the $200 price point, with enough margin to make a profit). Companies would be queuing to produce computers with ARM chips running Linux. As it is Microsoft is probably losing money due to marketing payola, with not as much revenue comming in from netbook installs (I have heard of only $5 per machine). Lets just hope these ARM netbooks turn up.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by hairyfeet (841228)

      The problem with ARM is the nasty little thing that is known as flash. Has anybody managed to get flash video to play on ARM yet? last I had heard that was a big nope. Folks won't be happy if they can't go to Youtube, and sadly I have been coming across more and more websites lately(especially big media sites) that if you don't have flash all you get is a big plugin symbol on a useless blank page.

      So while I wouldn't mind a $199 Netbook for checking email on, i just can't see the college kids down the stre

      • by omar.sahal (687649) on Friday April 24, 2009 @07:36PM (#27708211) Homepage Journal
        The following is taken form Adobe's website. Adobe Systems Incorporated and ARM today announced a technology collaboration to optimise and enable Adobe® Flash® Player 10 and Adobe AIRâ for ARM Powered® devices
        The joint technology optimisation is targeted for the ARMv6 and ARMv7architectures used in the ARM11â family and the Cortexâ-A series of processors and is expected to be available in the second half of 2009. announcement here [adobe.com]
      • Has anybody managed to get flash video to play on ARM yet? last I had heard that was a big nope. Folks won't be happy if they can't go to Youtube

        Why do you need Adobe Flash Player just to play YouTube on ARM? The iPod Touch has an ARM CPU and no Flash Player, yet YouTube works on it because it supports MPEG-4 AVC.

  • This is the first time I've looked at Windows 7. Some of the features seem like nice additions -- like the new ways to minimize/unminimize windows, and the left/right tiling feature for comparing two files or folders (something I do a lot). But in all honesty I don't feel compelled to upgrade from XP.

  • Windows XP Mode (Score:5, Informative)

    by Aggrajag (716041) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:19PM (#27707527)
    I think the most interesting new feature will the new Windows XP Mode which is
    basically Virtual PC running Windows XP client seamlessly on the desktop. Most
    likely it will gain interest in enterprises planning to upgrade XP installations.

    http://community.winsupersite.com/blogs/paul/archive/2009/04/24/secret-no-more-revealing-virtual-windows-xp-for-windows-7.aspx [winsupersite.com]
    • Re:Windows XP Mode (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Titanium Angel (557780) on Friday April 24, 2009 @06:35PM (#27707669)
      This is one of the most important developments in Windows history and will shape the future of Microsoft's operating systems. XP Mode will finally allow Microsoft to remove all of the legacy crap that's been holding Windows back for at least a decade.
  • by Godji (957148)
    Apparently the Windows 8 kernel is being reworked to provide dramatic performance improvements.

    Sure, why not.
  • In another exciting memo Microsoft states they're looking at some interface improvements for new Windows 10!
  • The current leaked version shows little change beyond bug fixes, so it would seem what you see is what you get.

    A beta that's actually truly feature-complete as God intended, oh my! Such a quaint old-fashioned thing to do in 2009...

  • No, Microsoft is 29 years old. It was founded in 1975.

    Falcon

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by falconwolf (725481)

      No, Microsoft is 29 years old. It was founded in 1975.

      Oops, 39 not 29.

      Falcon

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by falconwolf (725481)

        No, Microsoft is 29 years old. It was founded in 1975.

        Oops, 39 not 29.

        Another brain fart, 34 not 39.

        Falcon

  • by Trailer Trash (60756) on Friday April 24, 2009 @07:45PM (#27708281) Homepage
    It's become so bad that they had to drop to the singular.
  • In a stunning public relations coup, Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MNPLY) has successfully overshadowed today's release of Ubuntu Linux 9.04 "Juicy Jubblies" [today.com] by announcing its failed financials for a fourth quarter in a row and laying even more people off.

    Microsoft announced new and expanded roles for remaining key executives as another several lesser, losing quitters deserted upper management. "It shows the fantastic opportunity available to everyone at Microsoft to climb seven or eight reporting levels up the org chart," said marketing marketer Steve Ballmer to pitchfork-wielding Wall Street analysts today. "If we haven't laid them off for making too much money or not kissing enough ass."

    The Yahoo! deal is expected to go ahead. "We figure they'll go broke before we do. Probably." Mr Ballmer also plans to run the Yahoo! servers on Windows NT rather than FreeBSD after a similar change worked so well at Hotmail. "Some say synergy's another word for two plus two equals one, but you just have to make the value of one work for you."

    Windows 7 betas have been greeted with remarkable positive press. "Of course, the betas preview the 'champagne and hookers' edition, which would be way too much for netbooks and explode users' brains. Imagine thinking those little things are computers! So we're releasing what we call Windows 7 Dumbass Edition. It lets you log in and look at the shiny. Even Spider Solitaire has the ribbon toolbar! And you can buy an upgrade to the version that runs programs! It lets you do that!" Dumbass Edition comes with pre-installed viruses to make the computer part of the Storm, Conficker and FBI botnets. "If you can't beat ’em, join ’em."

    However, Microsoft has indicated to its press corps, Microsoft Completely Enderlependent Analysts, to ixnay on the evensay and highlight the job openings for work on Windows 8, firmly penciled in for a 2012 release. Windows 8 will be optimised for low-end 32-core systems with a mere 16 gigabytes of memory — 28 cores for the interface, 3 cores for the DRM and one core for everything else. "Seven is just so this year. I hear they'll get $DATABASE_FILESYSTEM done next release for sure!" said ZDNet marketing marketer Mary-Jo Enderle. "It'll be awesome!"

    "I'm sure it'll be fine, fine," said Bill Gates, upping his hours at his charitable foundation and scheduling the sale of several more packages of Microsoft stock.

    Larry Ellison of Oracle, who recently purchased Sun Microsystems, merely snickered, muttered "Java. OpenOffice." and let out a long and resounding laugh.

    Mark Shuttleworth of Canonical, speaking from his castle on a crag high on a mountaintop in west London, was sanguine at Ubuntu's news being overshadowed. "I lost ten million dollars on Ubuntu last year. I'm losing ten million dollars on Ubuntu this year. I expect to lose ten million dollars on Ubuntu next year. At this rate, I'll be broke in ... sixty years."

  • by Jackie_Chan_Fan (730745) on Saturday April 25, 2009 @12:45AM (#27709939)

    I actually just uninstalled the public beta release of Windows 7 on my older computer (AMD 3500+ 4GB Ram, ATI x1550).

    I'm amazed at how much better XP runs. Its much faster and smoother.

    Its faster at file copying, screen redraw, multitasking... EVERYTHING. I'm even running MS desktop search, Nod32, comodo firewall in XP and its still faster than Vista and windows 7.

    I will say that I do like the windows 7 taskbar though.

    Microsoft is really screwing up these days. As much as everyone complained about XP security wise.... Its a fast os.

    I'm now thinking of installing xp64 on my newer quadcore system and dumping Vista.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      For fun, i just turned Aero off in Vista, and set the theme to windows classic. The redraw in vista is so BAD compared to XP. I can litterally see every icon redraw in Vista but in XP... its so smooth.

      Why is Vista so fundementally flawed? Even with Aero off, its gui performs worse than XP.

      I just dont get it and apparently neither does Microsoft.

      Vista really is the new Windows ME. ... and Windows 7 is Vista :(

      I'm probably going to install XP 64 on my quadcore next time Vista takes a shit on the computer.

  • by Zero_DgZ (1047348) on Saturday April 25, 2009 @01:06AM (#27710051)

    Windows 7 isn't even out yet and already there's talk of the next product coming around the corner. I think this is part of the problem Microsoft is having with Vista: Nobody wants to invest in the considerable outlay in "upgrading" to the latest version of Windows when they already know their investment is going to be irrelevant in a year or two when something newer (read "better" in the eyes of Joe Sixpack) hits the shelves.

    "I'll hold off," say millions of cash-strapped computer users.

    And thus, the cycle repeats.

"The pyramid is opening!" "Which one?" "The one with the ever-widening hole in it!" -- The Firesign Theatre

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