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Opera 10.0 Released, With Integrated Web Server Functionality 437

Posted by timothy
from the two-way-street dept.
sherl0k writes "Opera 10.0, dubbed Opera Unite, has been released. Built into the Web browser is a full-fledged Web server, complete with nifty little gadgets such as a 'fridge' that people can post notes onto, a chat room, a widget to stream your music library anywhere, and a built-in file-sharing mechanism. It also scores 100/100 on the Acid3 test." Readers fudreporter and TLS point to The Register's report on the new release and a 5-minute video demo, respectively. Update: 06/16 15:18 GMT by T: Roar Lauritzsen of Opera Software writes to point out that "release" isn't quite the right word here; though you can download it, version 10.0 is still in beta, and the version with Unite is a labs (experimental) release.
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Opera 10.0 Released, With Integrated Web Server Functionality

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  • What? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Yvan256 (722131) on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @09:50AM (#28346981) Homepage Journal

    No kitchen sink?

    • Re:What? (Score:4, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @10:17AM (#28347241)

      The sink will be available as an Opera Widget.

      • Re:What? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @11:00AM (#28347729)

        Anyone else seeing graphics appearing midcomment on about 1/4 of the comments?

        • Re:What? (Score:5, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @11:02AM (#28347749)
          I'm seeing them on almost all of the comments. It's incredibly annoying. (running kubuntu9.04 firefocks3.0.11)
          • Re:What? (Score:5, Informative)

            by sopssa (1498795) <sopssa@email.com> on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @12:18PM (#28348815) Journal

            On every aspect the title and summary is just so wrong.

            To begin with, Opera 10 has not been released. Its in Beta.
            Opera Unite is not Opera 10, its a feature in Opera 10.
            Opera Unite is not a webserver, its a system where functionality is provided by widgets and other users can access those aswell (kinda like Google Wave)
            Opera provided some widgets to begin with, like File Sharing, Web Server, Media Player, Photo Sharing, The Lounge (chat), Fridge (post-a-note wall)
            All of these can be separately enabled or disabled.
            Atleast in the Opera 10 Beta, Unite and all the widgets were disabled by default.
            It makes direct connections when possible, and if user is behind NAT Opera proxy servers will route it (afaik)

            Its a great thing for an user who doesn't care or know how to install webservers, dont want to upload their private photos to imageshack or the like or chat via servers. The thing here is that instead of using websites, you can connect to your friends directly. Widgets provide the functionality then (theres API developers can use to make them)

            Hopefully that clarifies some about that incredibly bad summary.

            • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

              by syousef (465911)

              On every aspect the title and summary is just so wrong.

              It's getting so that Digg has better, more accurate summaries. Scary.

        • Re:What? (Score:4, Informative)

          by ipb (569735) on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @12:00PM (#28348489) Homepage
          I've been seeing them for about a week or so.
          Firefox 3.0.11
          Konqueror 3.5.9

          Very annoying
    • The kitchen sink server will be released soon, as part of their client software, Cup 1.0.

  • Excellent! (Score:5, Funny)

    by shadow349 (1034412) on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @09:52AM (#28346991)

    I'm sure all seven Opera users will be thrilled.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by gparent (1242548)
      They're all UNITED, though!
      • Re:Excellent! (Score:4, Informative)

        by sopssa (1498795) <sopssa@email.com> on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @10:24AM (#28347309) Journal

        eh, how wrong is the summary. Opera 10 != Opera Unite. Its just a feature in it. Surprisingly, TechCrunch has a good summary http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/06/16/that-reinvention-of-the-web-thing-opera-was-talking-about-its-called-opera-unite/ [techcrunch.com]

        • Re:Excellent! (Score:5, Informative)

          by sopssa (1498795) <sopssa@email.com> on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @10:29AM (#28347361) Journal

          âoeCurrently, most of us contribute content to the Web (for example by putting our personal information on social networking sites, uploading photos to Flickr, or maybe publishing blog posts), but we donâ(TM)t contribute to its fabric â" the underlying infrastructure that defines the online landscape that we inhabit.

          Our computers are only dumb terminals connected to other computers (meaning servers) owned by other people â" such as large corporations â" who we depend upon to host our words, thoughts, and images. We depend on them to do it well and with our best interests at heart. We place our trust in these third parties, and we hope for the best, but as long as our own computers are not first class citizens on the Web, we are merely tenants, and hosting companies are the landlords of the Internet.â

          This is more of a way for people to communicate, share and do stuff together rather than using websites. You know, P2P. It has developer API so new stuff can be added, opera's own stuff currently include webserver, chat room, note board, streaming and file sharing.

          Its quite nice system actually, and you dont need to share your stuff to all of the internet or upload your photos to facebook or similar.

          • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

            by Anonymous Coward

            Dial down the drama. It is all funneled through Opera's servers, because if the users knew how to forward a port from their router to their computer, then they could have had their own server for ages. With Opera's help, they can now enjoy their new freedom in Opera's walled garden.

          • But it doesn't change the fact that I don't want a web SERVER built into my web BROWSER. I'll get Apache separately, thanks.
            • by sopssa (1498795)

              So just dont enable it. Whole Unity feature isn't enabled by default, and even then you enable the separate features/widgets in it.

              Btw, even Opera 10 beta seems incredibly fast.

            • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

              by elcid73 (599126)

              Sure, I don't want a web SERVER either (in the common parlance)- but maybe a server that just does some quick task for me: I find value in being able to easily share my photos with people with little to know real effort on my part. I currently have to FTP/batch to my webserver and "reindex" the site so thumbnails are generated. I would find value in having an EyeFi memory card dump pictures into a folder and they are immediately available to view- no work done at all on my part.

              ...that said, I am concern

          • Re:Excellent! (Score:4, Insightful)

            by TooMuchToDo (882796) on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @12:28PM (#28349029)
            I don't want my pictures, banking, email (thanks Gmail!), etc to rely on a P2P network of home computers. I want servers doing what they do best, serving data from a facility with backup power, redundant connectivity, and some sort of physical security. And I want my laptop/desktop doing what they do best, fetching info from the rest of the world.
    • Re:Excellent! (Score:5, Informative)

      by Kamokazi (1080091) on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @10:50AM (#28347613)
      I would be, if it was actually Opera 10 being released today. However that is not the case. They released the Alpha of their new Unite collaboration thingamajig which requires the current BETA of Opera 10. The current version is still 9.64, with 9.7 in beta testing, so it will be some time before 10 comes out.
      • The current version is still 9.64, with 9.7 in beta testing, so it will be some time before 10 comes out.

        I don't believe there is a 9.7 beta. The Opera 10 beta was released recently, and this builds upon it. They are definitely working towards a v10 release in the relatively near future.

  • Acid 3 test (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Pretend for a second that I don't know anything about Acid 3. Pretend I'm just a regular Joe-sixpack web user.

    Why should I care that my browser scored 100/100 on the Acid 3 test?

    • Re:Acid 3 test (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @09:55AM (#28347027)

      Pretend for a second that I don't know anything about Acid 3. Pretend I'm just a regular Joe-sixpack web user.

      Why should I care that my browser scored 100/100 on the Acid 3 test?

      I would pitch Acid 3 compliance in this manner: This web browser is 100% compliant with the proper web rendering standards. The more compliant your web browser is, the less likely your web browser will break. You can take that to the bank. You spend less time with a broken browser, and more time enjoying a cold one.

      • Re:Acid 3 test (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Kandenshi (832555) on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @10:01AM (#28347099)

        The more compliant your web browser is, the less likely your web browser will break.

        I love webstandards, and wish greatly that all browsers supported them well. But I just don't think that quote is factually true. If your browser adheres to webstandards that IE doesn't then it's quite possible/plausible that your browser will fail to deliver websites that look and function like you and the designer expected it to.

        People "should" code to standards, but I just don't think that it's (yet) true that they DO.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Swizec (978239)

          The more compliant your web browser is, the less likely your web browser will break.

          I love webstandards, and wish greatly that all browsers supported them well. But I just don't think that quote is factually true. If your browser adheres to webstandards that IE doesn't then it's quite possible/plausible that your browser will fail to deliver websites that look and function like you and the designer expected it to.

          People "should" code to standards, but I just don't think that it's (yet) true that they DO.

          However Opera is known to also be subject to many IE bugs at will. Ever since the latest browser wars began with firefox 1.3 and early webkit Opera was best out there since it both adhered to standards and didn't break badly made websites. I don't know how they manage doing this, but they do.

        • by sjames (1099)

          It's a matter of perspective. If your browser is 100% compliant and the site looks wrong, the site is broken, not your browser.

          Agreed, that doesn't mean the sites will be fixed. Hopefully people will realize which is broken and appropriately look down upon the site until they get with the program and tell IE6 users to go get a real browser..

          • by rgviza (1303161)

            Conversely, if 90% of people use a broken browser, and your perfectly standards compliant site looks broken to them, then the perception is that your site is broken. The users' perception is your reality since often the person paying you is also a user of the site ;)

            This, is precisely why it's nearly impossible to code a perfectly standards compliant site that is anything but pure html. Mostly because the DOM standard is partially ignored or functionality included in the DOM was implemented by some browsers

            • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

              by sjames (1099)

              Agreed, there's a ways to go. Fortunatly with IE6 fading and IE as a whole losing market share, we can at least hope the days of the site that proudly proclaims itself to require IE and refuses to even try for anything else are over for good.

              Next step is for IE to become the bastard stepchild browser that gets the reduced functionality page while the other browsers get the full capability (to the extent that they comply with standards).

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by jonbryce (703250)

        Talking of banks, will it work at https://www.nwolb.com/ [nwolb.com] or https://www.rbsdigital.com/ [rbsdigital.com] ? They are the world's largest bank, and don't have a good reputation for supporting alternative browsers.

      • by bigpresh (207682) <davidp@preshweb.co.uk> on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @10:08AM (#28347153) Homepage

        You spend less time with a broken browser, and more time enjoying a cold one.

        Dude, necrophilia is wrong.

      • Re:Acid 3 test (Score:4, Insightful)

        by CastrTroy (595695) on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @11:02AM (#28347743) Homepage
        You could say that, but you would be wrong. Getting 100/100 on Acid3 does not in any way prove that you follow the specs 100%. ACID 3 tests a certain portion of the standards that most browsers have trouble with. Personally, I've found that Safari which also has a history of scoring very high on these tests, has many rendering bugs that show up when rendering normal everyday webpages. Scoring 100% ACID 3 only means that you have created a browser than can render ACID 3 correctly, and not that your browser would render any other web page properly when it was trying to read it.
    • by Xest (935314)

      It's an accessibility thing.

      The score refers to how usable a browser is to someone on acid, so 100/100 means someone on acid can use the browser fully. It came about as a realisation that some of the worlds greatest computer scientists were users of acid, particularly at Berkley and hence there was recognition that we needed to ensure that they too can use the internet.

      No, seriously though that's bullshit, it's actually a standards compliance test. If you've used multiple browsers you may have come across s

    • Acid 3 is completely irrelevant to users, it's important for web designers. Each Acid test demonstrates, in an easy-to-test way, a certain subset of web standards. When all of the major browsers pass them, you can safely use that subset of the standards and be sure that your users will see the page you want them to see.
    • Why should I care that my browser scored 100/100 on the Acid 3 test?

      In general? Because it means more advanced features, that are fully standards compliant and targetable as a development platform.

      In this case? Because it shows that Opera are working on getting some things right in their browser, even if they haven't managed to stop the thing displaying cached pages from sites that aren't even running any more.

  • Alpha! (Score:4, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @09:54AM (#28347017)

    Somewhere in the summary you REALLY should mention this is an ALPHA release, not a final release.

    Thanks.

  • by Hanzie (16075) * on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @09:56AM (#28347049)
    I'm posting this from Opera 10. It seems quite different from the last version. Slashdot looks very, very good. To enable the file sharing, you have to click the "+" tab at the bottom and explicitly enable the web serving goodness. It includes a media player, to share your music collection around. I think we might have a game changer here. hanzie.
  • by Rogerborg (306625) on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @09:57AM (#28347055) Homepage

    It's a botnet writer's wet dream; a victim that will host your exploit once you've pwned it.

    We can only hope that it's secure, or else the two dozen people who actually use Opera will be very unpopular indeed, at least until the RIAA has then rounded up for sharing their tunes with (world + dog).

    • by evanbd (210358)
      If you can exploit a computer in any meaningful sense (ie get your code running on it), then it's fairly trivial to get a web server running. Contrary to popular belief, a basic web server is a *really* simple program. This won't even save a malware author any time or effort; it's as easy to ship their own as to reconfigure the one already present.
  • by ablaze (222561) on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @09:59AM (#28347069) Journal
    Looks great, except that 10.0 isn't released yet, and Opera Unite is a "labs build", aka alpha release.
  • Security (Score:3, Insightful)

    by sleekware (1109351) * on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @10:03AM (#28347119)
    I don't think it's a good idea to run a web server on the average user's PC for security reasons. If there is a web server running on an un-patched (or not patched up to date, rather) and improperly firewalled it could be compromised in a small amount of time. Seeing as many have personal data on their PC as well this makes it worse. Plus, isn't it common practice to separate web servers from the rest of a network also for security reasons?
  • Oblig (Score:3, Funny)

    by CopaceticOpus (965603) on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @10:10AM (#28347181)

    Yo dawg, I heard you like surfing, so we put a web server in your browser so you can surf while your surf!

  • What about auto-updates?

    This is something what prevents me from even considering Opera as main web-browser.

    IE (in a way) does it. Chrome does it. FireFox does it. Opera - doesn't.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by elcid73 (599126)

      10.0 has auto updates, but as other commenters have pointed out- 10.0 is in beta and seperate from the "Opera Unite" stuff of the article. You can learn more about auto update and try it out on the beta page [opera.com]

  • Despite the obvious differences the whole thing somehow reminded me of Google Wave. It seems when the time of an idea comes (distributed communication service, every user can run a server easily, something like that) then different teams come up with similar solutions independently without knowing about each other's work.

    The apparent drawbacks of Opera Unite are bandwidth problems when running locally (e.g. ADSL upload speed) and the services being dependent on your computer being turned on.

    Google Wave seem

  • i can just see it now... your mom calls from her vacation abroad: "Hey! How you doing? Can you turn your laptop on i want to show uncle henry your photos of the wedding", "mom, it's 3am... i wish i had put my photos on flckr!"

  • by Tarlus (1000874) on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @10:56AM (#28347681)
    Did they just slap a GUI on Emacs?

    *Runs away*
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      Did they just slap a GUI on Emacs?

      No, but I hear that Emacs is going to be one of Opera Unite widgets in the final release. Now you can truly run your OS inside your browser!

  • Running Ubuntu on a 64 bit box. This version of OPera seems more reliable on flash / youtube videos than 64bit FF 3. FF runs a few vids, then stops - with zombied npviewer processes that prevent any more vids until the box is rebooted.

    My unscientific tests of Opera 10 (i.e. about an hour, this afternoon) hasn't had any problems with vids, so far - even though FF is firmly screwed.

  • that my printer has a web server built in. Now my browser is going to have one too?????
    Just one more thing to patch
  • by ChronoFish (948067) on Tuesday June 16, 2009 @11:37AM (#28348187) Journal

    The "Fishbowl" browser had an integrated web server.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20010502014727/chronofish.com/FishBowl/ [archive.org]

    -CF

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