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VLC 1.0.0 Released 419

Posted by Soulskill
from the now-supports-kitchen-sink dept.
rift321 writes "VLC media player, which we all know for simplifying the playback of pretty much any codec out there, has finally released version 1.0.0. Here's a quick list of improvements: live recording, instant pausing and frame-by-frame support, finer speed controls, new HD codecs (AES3, Dolby Digital Plus, TrueHD, Blu-Ray Linear PCM, Real Video 3.0 and 4.0), new formats (Raw Dirac, M2TS) and major improvements in many formats, new Dirac encoder and MP3 fixed-point encoder, video scaling in fullscreen, RTSP Trickplay support, zipped file playback, customizable toolbars, easier encoding GUI in Qt interface, better integration in Gtk environments, MTP devices on Linux, and AirTunes streaming."
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VLC 1.0.0 Released

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  • by Rogerborg (306625) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:17AM (#28607697) Homepage
    Has anyone fixed the volume control yet, or is that too trivial to bother with?
  • by frednofr (854428) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:23AM (#28607795)

    Without hardware accelerated h.264 playback, I'm not going back to VLC.

    Still, it's a great do it all player / streamer.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:33AM (#28607975)

      VLC 1.0.0 and 1.1.0 can be compiled with VAAPI to get hardware acceleration.

      • by westlake (615356) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @11:06AM (#28608461)
        VLC 1.0.0 and 1.1.0 can be compiled with VAAPI to get hardware acceleration. The simplest way to insure a permanent fractional 1% share for Linux is to require a compiler to gain functionality the OSX and Windows app delivers on launch.
      • by sarhjinian (94086) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @11:57AM (#28609241)

        That does not help. Saying "well, you can just compile in support for ____" shouldn't be acceptable in this day and age. You shoudn't have to compile in support for a given piece of hardware into a player: this is why we have things called "drivers" and "APIs".

        Video on non-MacOS/Windows is in an awful state, even when using the same player. If I use VLC on a Macintosh or Windows machine, I can play back content without skipping, sync, artifacts, tearing or stuttering as long as it's within reasonable processing limits. On Linux, it's a crapshoot, completely dependent on the player, video card, window manager and version of X and/or video drivers. I know it's supposedly getting better, but there's still no unified video acceleration API, it looks like nVidia and ATI are going to propose competing (VDPAU, XvBA) standards, and it looks like players are going to need to know about them in order to get reasonable performance. That's akin to having to code applications to support SoundBlaster or AdLib cards, which, I feel the need to point out, was the case in the late 1980s.

        There's something seriously wrong when I can watch, say, YouTube content or a simple video file on an Intel Atom-based netbook running Windows and it plays more smoothly than on a Xeon 5520-equipped workstation running Linux. Video on Linux makes the current Audio on Linux clusterf_ck look simple by comparison; it's an unacceptable state of affairs for what is a very important consumer-level aspect of computing.

        I don't want to seem as if I'm coming down on the people doing some very, very good work on this. Watching the progress on X/DRM/Mesa and the various drives is impressive and they've made great strides, but posts that talk about compiling in support for a piece of hardware into a player and/or getting bleeding-edge drivers and/or turning off things like compositing are the wrong way to address the problem.

        • by Doug Neal (195160) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @12:31PM (#28609787)

          That does not help. Saying "well, you can just compile in support for ____" shouldn't be acceptable in this day and age. You shoudn't have to compile in support for a given piece of hardware into a player: this is why we have things called "drivers" and "APIs".

          That's what the 'API' part of VAAPI is :-)

          There's nothing wrong with having compile-time options in open-source software. It's the job of the package and distribution maintainers to abstract this kind of thing away from end users. It'll be a while before this 1.0.0 release filters down to users' desktops through their package managers, which you could wait for and not have to worry about it (this is certainly what I'll be doing)... but if you want the latest and greatest direct from the developers as soon as it's released then you can't complain about having to get your hands a bit dirty.

    • by Jamamala (983884) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:39AM (#28608053)
      VLC supports hardware acceleration on nVidia G80 and higher hardware using VDPAU on Linux. As soon as ATI releases a XvBA driver, hardware acceleration should be possible through VAAPI.
      • by AikonMGB (1013995)

        Do you have a link to a well-written guide on setting this up? I've been trying to test it out on my laptop (which research tells me /can/ run VDPAU), but I'm a Linux user, not a developer, and I keep getting lost and giving up before I reach the destination =(

        Aikon-

        • by loutr (626763)
          It should Just Work TM, provided you're using a recent proprietary nvidia driver (some weeks ago you had to use the betas, but I think the latest official release supports VDPAU), and that the apps you're using are compiled with VDPAU support. On Arch Linux, I just had to install the latest beta nvidia driver and XBMC 9.04, and it worked.
          • by rho (6063) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @12:03PM (#28609335) Homepage Journal

            You have the oddest definition of "Just Work" that I've ever seen.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by Otto (17870)

              Seems pretty valid to me. On the more recent linux systems, installing the latest video driver is a matter of going to the install program of whatever stripe, selecting the video driver, and saying "install it". Given that, then installing the video player, it should indeed "Just Work". It's not a matter of having to compile your own, if you're using a distribution that does relatively recent compiles of code (Ubuntu, Fedora, Arch all the popular ones).

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by rho (6063)

              Everybody who has replied to me used words that, if uttered anywhere near a locker room, would earn the speaker a thorough wedgie. Yet they are unanimous in their assertion that it's non-trivial.

              Nerds.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      You might want to read this [jbkempf.com] then. It appears that there are even patches [splitted-desktop.com] available for vdpau (=NVIDIA's hardware acceleration). I haven't tried this yet myself though (but will be as soon as I get home from work).
    • Without hardware accelerated h.264 playback, I'm not going back to VLC.

      People are looking into hardware accelerated codecs. Some of the approaches aren't cross-platform, but it is better to see some progress somewhere, than none at all. I holding out for solutions that can take advantage of stuff like OpenCL.

      Another focus for getting hardware accelerated video into VLC is ffmpeg, though I am not sure what sort of effort if being done here?

    • by tlhIngan (30335)

      Without hardware accelerated h.264 playback, I'm not going back to VLC.

      Still, it's a great do it all player / streamer

      Actually, that's one reason why I use VLC - because I know it's not going to use any accelleration except minor ones that don't affect much (e.g., DirectX video surfaces). It's important when you remove the DRM that you actually removed the DRM, and sometimes testing it with Windows Media Player doesn't help (you can check through the properties, but I'd like to be sure). With VLC not using

  • by viralMeme (1461143) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:23AM (#28607801)
    Would I have to pay royalties to MPEG LA [tgdaily.com] to watch MPEG-2 encoded media on VLC media player
  • by omnichad (1198475) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:25AM (#28607847) Homepage

    So much for being acquired by Google.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:26AM (#28607867)

    Thank god for Instant Pausing and Frame by Frame support. I needed more granularity over the location bar while watching porn videos. The old versions seem to be skipping to and from "keyframes" during seeking. It was very frustrating.

    • Now now -- porn would be easy-- that one clear perfect frame in an regular movie or sometimes even TV is the hard part.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Winckle (870180)

      It's great for taking DVD screen grabs too.

      Of purely non-pornographical content.

    • In all seriousness, I just tried it out and, despite its claims to the contrary, it does still "jumps" around when you try to advance the time slider and the full-screen pop-up interface, while improved over some awful early versions, is still annoying (it pops up at any mouse movement, not just when the mouse is at the bottom of the screen). I'll stick to the FAR superior GOM [wikipedia.org] thank you very much. If only GOM had a Linux version, it would be the perfect media player (with the best and most feature-filled us
    • by bughunter (10093) <bughunter@noSPaM.earthlink.net> on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @02:10PM (#28611315) Journal

      Hey - go ahead and mod him Funny, but porn is srs bsns. Wankers are the power user of video players. We need:

      1. Instant Pausing
      2. frame step forward AND frame step backward
      3. skip ahead, skip time set in prefs (default something like 5 seconds)
      4. thumbwheel support and a slider bar
      5. bookmarks with thumbnails
      6. robust error handling for bad files and scratched DVDs
      7. ignore autoplay and other odious crap installed on commercial DVDs
      8. timely codec updates

      If VLC can at least manage the first four, I may pay for an upgrade to OS X 10.5 - I'm getting tired of Quicktime Player and DVD Player.

  • by smellsofbikes (890263) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:27AM (#28607869) Journal
    If anyone has tried this and played around with its menu support I'd love to hear about it. I have several newer DVD's that won't play on VLC, Ogle, or mplayer. Oh, they'll play: the stupid previews, the trailers, the additional material. But the intro screen with a menu item that says 'play movie', crashes any of them when I try to actually play the movie. This is happening on a brand-new copy of Stardust and another of Letters from Iwo Jima, and it's making my linux sell really difficult for my girlfriend and my roommate, who both say "if it can't play a DVD, I'm not using it". Sigh
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Wooky_linuxer (685371)
      I wonder if there isn't any copy protection mechanism that breaks the player. I once tried to rip a Wall-E DVD and it appeared to have over 60GB in it. They are using false sectors in the disk to fool rippers. Perhaps these DVDs you tried to watch have some similar "feature" that messes up the Linux software. You could try playing the .vob files directly as a workaround.
    • by qoncept (599709) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:50AM (#28608187) Homepage
      Sigh? As in, you don't like that? What's wrong with "If it doesn't do what I want, I'm not using it." Sounds pretty reasonable to me. It's why I gave up on my Linux expirament (along with "If it makes the things I want to do a horrible pain in the ass, I'm not using it.")
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      Hate to go off topic, but I was having a similar problem and so far, Xine has played all the discs that VLC and MPlayer couldn't.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Hatta (162192) *

      it's making my linux sell really difficult for my girlfriend and my roommate, who both say "if it can't play a DVD, I'm not using it". Sigh

      Don't sell linux. Quitting windows is like quitting smoking, if deep down you don't really want to quit, you never will.

  • by McDutchie (151611) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:56AM (#28608315) Homepage
    Any remaining Tiger users needn't bother. As of this version, VLC requires Mac OS X 10.5. This is not obvious from the website.
    • by oDDmON oUT (231200) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @12:17PM (#28609581)

      How is this (http://www.videolan.org/vlc/download-macosx.html) not obvious?

      "VLC media player for Mac OS X
      Latest Mac OS X package for 10.5 and 10.6 (release 1.0.0)
      universal binary (29MB)
      latest platform specific packages for 10.5 and 10.6 (release 1.0.0)
      intel package (17.9MB)
      powerpc package (17.8MB)
      Last Mac OS X package for 10.4 (release 0.9.9a)"

      I mean yeah, I had to scroll to the bottom of the page for the 10.4 info but.... /shrug

  • VLC has shitty subtitle support, why VLC gets accolades is beyond me when there are so many bugs compared to just downloading one of the many great community made codec packs and media player classic.

    VLC is jack of all trades master of none, with weird bugs when you want to play subtitled files.

    • by compro01 (777531)

      Subbing bugs aside, I keep VLC handy as it will play ANYTHING. Files in obscure codecs that media player classic fails on. Even files that my codec identifier gives up on, though media player classic HC is still my choice for day-to-day use.

    • VLC "just works" when you throw video files at it. Where am I, a novice, supposed to find a "community made codec pack"? I barely know what a codec is, and moreover I don't care. And having downloaded one, which one's the best? I swear, it's like wanting to buy a shirt, and then having to spend time researching stitch counts and whether the garment was dyed after assembly or the fabric was dyed before stitching. As for subtitled movies, nobody watches them. If you're Wapanese then go to hell, otherwis
      • by Pulzar (81031)

        Where am I, a novice, supposed to find a "community made codec pack"?

        http://lmgtfy.com/?q=community+made+codec+pack [lmgtfy.com]

        And having downloaded one, which one's the best? I swear, it's like wanting to buy a shirt, and then having to spend time researching stitch counts and whether the garment was dyed after assembly or the fabric was dyed before stitching.

        I'm sure you know that if you don't do any research, you're definitely *not* getting the best one. So, either you care to get the best one or you don't... if yo

  • by ChipR (1424) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @11:21AM (#28608721)

    I like VLC, I really do. For that matter, I like xine too. But neither one, as far as I can tell, can do one thing that mplayer does: Display closed captioning. No, that's not DVD subtitles. It's purely a US American thing, so is routinely ignored, or at least misunderstood, by the international communities that maintain these products.

    I watched a thread on a VLC (or was it xine?) discussion forum where somebody asked about closed captioning support. After about twelve messages, they finally determined that no, it really wasn't the same as subtitles (some participants never were convinced of that fact), but was "some American thing", at which point amidst a lot of tongue clucking and regrets, the thread fizzled out.

    So until a media player can display closed captions, I'm not really able to use it. But nice try, guys, and keep up the good work.

    (Yes, I am sure I could dive into the mplayer code, locate the closed-captioning bits, extract them, and submit them to both VLC and xine as patches. I'll get right on that, mmm-hmmm!)

    • by Hatta (162192) *

      But neither one, as far as I can tell, can do one thing that mplayer does: Display closed captioning. No, that's not DVD subtitles. It's purely a US American thing, so is routinely ignored, or at least misunderstood, by the international communities that maintain these products.

      What do deaf people in Europe do for TV then?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @02:18PM (#28611429)

      From the release notes:

      Changes between 0.9.9a and 1.0.0:

      * Closed Captions using the SCTE-20 standard are now correctly decoded

  • by Rich Klein (699591) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @11:29AM (#28608829) Homepage Journal

    Checking for updates from VLC 0.9.9 reports that I have the latest version. I figured I'd visit Videolan's site and see what the release notes said about upgrading, but I can't find any release notes. So I tried checking the FAQ, wiki, and forums. The FAQ doesn't cover upgrading from 0.9.9 to 1.0.0, and the wiki and forum links just seem to return you to the VLC main page. I'm downloading 1.0.0 now. I'll probably end up uninstalling 0.9.9 and installing 1.0.0, but it sure would be nice if the "check for updates" functionality worked. And it would be nice if the wiki and forums worked, too.

  • As someone who usually listens to music as entire albums, the playlist has a great feature. The playlist can be displayed as a tree. This is disabled by default, but can be enabled in the preferences. It is nice to drag folders onto the playlist and see the songs for each album grouped together.

    Unfortunately, I can't see any way to reorder this list. When I try dragging items around, I end up putting one album folder inside another, rather than reordering them.

    Also, it would be really nice if there was a wa

  • Zipped file playback (Score:3, Interesting)

    by NitroWolf (72977) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @11:40AM (#28608991) Homepage

    I can't seem to find any additional information on the zipped file playback stated in the summary. Can anyone elaborate on that? Do they literally mean it will only play files that are zipped, or will it finally play back multi-part RAR files? I (and many others) have been asking for this functionality for years now - I even went so far as to submit a patch for this functionality... however, the developers (at least at the time) were whiny little princesses and refused to implement a feature like that because it compromises the integrity of VLC (no seriously, that was the reason).

    As such, the lack of multi-part RAR playback has made VLC pretty much useless for serious media centers. If they've finally backpeddled and implemented this feature, my hat is off to them for manning up and accepting the fact that multipart RARs are a standard (however unfortunate that is) and the ability to play back media that is in that "format" is a necessity for a good player.

    If they have still not implemented this functionality, however, VLC is still fairly useless for true universal media players, since other software is capable of it and works just as well if not better.

    So - can anyone elaborate on that?

  • I've been using and recommending VLC for years but recently tried to open a training AVI that, while it would play, would freeze up the machine and take
    nearly 5 minutes to load. Windows Media Player also had lots of trouble with it and all the alternative players would freeze, crash or spit errors.

    Strangely, tools that claim to be able to fix AVIs couldn't find anything wrong. Then, 2 weeks ago, I came across XULplayer and tried opening the file
    with it - it hangs for about a minute but then plays normally.

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