Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Windows Operating Systems Software The Almighty Buck

Windows 7 To Sell In UK For Half the US Price 487

Posted by kdawson
from the but-wait-you-also-get dept.
An anonymous reader writes "In the UK, a full version of Windows 7 Home Premium is going to cost less than half the price Americans will have to pay, and in fact less than Americans have to pay just for the upgrade-only edition. Full details and prices were published in an article on CNet, in which it was concluded that, at least for the time being, Microsoft is honoring the prices it set for the now-discontinued European version of Win7, which did not contain Internet Explorer 8 and was only available as a full-install edition."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Windows 7 To Sell In UK For Half the US Price

Comments Filter:
  • So, (Score:5, Funny)

    by Philip K Dickhead (906971) <folderol@fancypants.org> on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @08:23PM (#29113271) Journal

    Do Yanks start ordering from amazon.co.uk?

  • by billstewart (78916) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @08:24PM (#29113281) Journal

    I guess they're pricing it for their target market? Surely nobody would ship a copy from the UK over to North America!

    • by Pharmboy (216950)

      But does it come in AMERICAN English?

      Maybe I can buy a downloadable upgrade, and run through a brit proxy to download it....

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by dbIII (701233)
        Just remember that "start" stands for "yawl cleeek ere ta doo yaw mommas pewter thangs" and you'll be fine. Getting hold of english textbooks from before Reagan's administration might help.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Mashiki (184564)

      Yeah I mean that translation was difficult. It's the same version they sell in Canada.

      • by AliasMarlowe (1042386) on Wednesday August 19, 2009 @02:53AM (#29115671) Journal

        Yeah I mean that translation was difficult. It's the same version they sell in Canada.

        Having lived for years in the US (several states), UK, and Canada (Ontario & BC), I can assure you that Canadian English is as close to American as to British, but is distinct from both. Yes, Canucks spell colour with a "u" and so forth, but they also use the US "-ize" ending instead of the Brit "-ise" ending on many words, leading to particularly Canadian forms such as "colourize". In vocabulary, Canucks use US words such as "crosswalk", "sidewalk", and "apartment", rather than the Brit equivalents, and adopt the US meaning for "chips". As in the US but not the UK, words in Canadian are as likely to be imported from Italian as from French (e.g. "zucchini" rather than "courgette"). However, Canucks appear to be split or undecided on the vexed question of whether to use "aluminum" or "aluminium".
        FWIW, I am not originally from the US or the UK or Canada.

  • by pablo_max (626328) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @08:26PM (#29113305)

    ...most will just DL it anyhow...does it really matter? ;)

  • Arbitrage (Score:5, Interesting)

    by prakslash (681585) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @08:28PM (#29113331)

    This will lead to people indulging in arbitrage [wikipedia.org].
    Unless, of course, Microsoft has somehow put in a mechanism that disables a UK-bought Windows 7 when someone attempts to install it on a computer located in the US.

    • by langelgjm (860756) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @08:46PM (#29113445) Journal
      It relies on advanced authentication mechanism that involves the (potential) user spelling several words: honour, colour, etc. If the user misses any "u", it refuses to activate.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        I guess everyone from Canada won't have any issues!

        • by Txiasaeia (581598)
          Ah, but what they don't tell you is that they also look for the British spelling of "realise" -- most Canadians follow the Yank spelling. I smell a honey pot!
          • Except, according to the Oxford dictionary, realize is more correct (because of its Greek origins). The use of -ise instead of -ize is a recent British innovation (recent in the sense of the last century or so) ... mainly so people don't misspell analyse the way we do (which is not of Greek origin). -ize is one of the rare cases where the North American spelling is actually closer to traditional, "correct" English than the UK -ise ... in stark contrast to almost every other difference between the two ("ti

      • by Minwee (522556)
        So Canadian users are either totally screwed, or have just been saved a whole lot of pain.
      • And just because I'm an American who spells colour, honour, behaviour, etc. with the letter "u", doesn't mean I'm British.

    • by ae1294 (1547521)

      Unless, of course, Microsoft has somehow put in a mechanism that disables a UK-bought Windows 7 when someone attempts to install it on a computer located in the US.

      No no... that's not how this works.. you allow a a few million copies to be sold to Americans then you release a security fix that automaticlly installs and disables any copy that is located anywhere in America based on it's IP address thus forcing those stupid Americans to buy yet another license which will be offered at a slight discount from the US retail version.

      Basically you make much more money and piss off your customer base at the same time.....

      • Considering how many computers are behind router on non-routable subnets, that's not going to work. Just have it check to see what the time zone is. Of course, that lets out Canada, but that's just minor collateral damage to somebody as big as Microsoft.
        • by ae1294 (1547521)

          Considering how many computers are behind router on non-routable subnets, that's not going to work. Just have it check to see what the time zone is. Of course, that lets out Canada, but that's just minor collateral damage to somebody as big as Microsoft.

          THE HELL IT'S NOT.. WinXP boxes connect to a Microsoft server once a day for updates, somehow I don't think SEVEN is going to be much different...

    • Re:Arbitrage (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Tubal-Cain (1289912) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @09:43PM (#29113857) Journal

      This will lead to people indulging in arbitrage [wikipedia.org].

      You say that like that's a bad thing.

    • by Darinbob (1142669)
      Well someone is going to want to do compatibility testing with foreign versions. Does Microsoft prevent this, or do you get a special authorization key if you buy foreign versions from Microsoft US? I wouldn't mind getting the UK version, but I'd hate to have the authorization fail.
  • by craznar (710808) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @08:29PM (#29113337) Homepage
    This reminds me of a story once told by Nicholas Wirth:

    When he was in Europe - they called him 'Nicholas Wirth', the correct pronunciation.
    When he was in USA - they called him 'Nickles Worth', the incorrect pronunciation.

    He inferred this was because whilst in Europe they called him by name, when in USA they called him by value.

    Well Microsoft seems to have definitely reversed that with this decision.
  • Yeah? So? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by erroneus (253617) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @08:34PM (#29113369) Homepage

    We've got region coding on DVDs that does the same thing -- different prices for different markets because we all know that "one market" just isn't right. We must have several markets because different markets will bear different amounts. It would definitely be counter-productive to not take advantage of markets that will pay more or those that will only pay less.

    It also makes sense that markets that are more likely to switch to Linux or Mac OS X should pay less and that markets that are less likely to switch should pay more. I have pondered the notion of how a national switch to Linux could work out for any nation and I have to say, it's really hard to imagine. But with that said, the entire globe managed to switch to the metric system, including the U.K. Oh wait, not the entire world... the U.S. is a hold-out... is the U.S. the *last* hold-out? (I dunno) So while the world might switch away from Windows, the U.S. is probably the least likely to make that change.

    Is it illegal to fix prices like this? It is in the U.S. It is in other countries. But is it illegal to fix prices for specific countries so long as the whole country is included in that fixed price? I guess so since no one is charging Microsoft with any crimes... yet...

    • by langelgjm (860756)

      Charging different prices in different markets isn't price fixing, it's price discrimination. Those are totally different things.

      Price discrimination is what museums do when they offer student and senior discounts. Or, it's what the street vendor does when he sees you're wearing nice clothes are tells you your trinket is $10, instead the $5 he just sold one for to the people in old jeans.

      Price fixing would be if all the sellers in a market got together and agreed not to sell to anyone below a certain price.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by digitalunity (19107)

        Artificially enforcing price discrimination should be illegal. Countries have used tariffs for many years to try to balance the value of a cheaper import good with that which is produced locally to make their own products more competitive.

        One example of the end result is a huge glut of corn syrup usage in american foods, whereas if there were no tariffs on cane sugar importation, sugar would once again be the primary sweetener used in food industry instead of corn syrup. This is market inefficiency at its f

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by nadaou (535365)

      the entire globe managed to switch to the metric system, including the U.K. Oh wait, not the entire world... the U.S. is a hold-out... is the U.S. the *last* hold-out? (I dunno)

      Now that the Philippines has switched, I think it is just Liberia and Burma left. And England still uses miles sometime, where appropriate.

      For the record, Celsius sucks for the "how warm is it today?" question (the scale based on 0-100% is better), Meters suck for "how big is this object I hold?" question, and using a drill size 1/64

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by nadaou (535365)

        another example: when working with a (foot long) wrench or spanner, with the Foot-pound you can simply & intuitively feel how much force to apply. With the Newton-Meter you need a special gauge to know.

        • Re:Yeah? So? (Score:5, Insightful)

          by shutdown -p now (807394) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @10:27PM (#29114135) Journal

          It's all simple and intuitive when it's the system you've been taught and used since childhood. Trust me, for someone who's been using metric for all his life, meters and kilograms and degrees Celsius are perfectly easy to use and intuitive, while your pounds, feet, and Fahrenheit are totally weird and incomprehensible. Especially conversions between them.

          12 inches in a foot, but 3 feet in a yard - why? And 1760 yards in a mile - gosh, how convenient that must be. Even better when you get to area and volume units - I mean, 1728 cubic inch in a cubic foot sure roll from the tongue, and is easy to remember as well. And 1 acre being 43560 square inch is so obvious! If that wasn't enough, you have separate units of volume, which follow their own, mixed 2/4-based progression (unlike mixed 3/4-based for length) - gallon/quart/pint. I also love how there's 16 ounces in a pound, but then 2000 pounds in a short ton - hey, it's almost metric - yay for consistency!

          All the claims about Imperial being more "natural" or easier to use are pure bullshit. The only difference between the systems is that one is decimal-friendly and consistent, and another is not.

          • Re:Yeah? So? (Score:4, Insightful)

            by eccenthink (1312043) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @11:27PM (#29114619)

            And 1 acre being 43560 square inch is so obvious!

            No, it's 43560 square feet in an acre, not square inches though I guess you sort of proved your point as you confused the units while describing how much harder it is to remember conversions in english units versus metric units.

          • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

            by Shakrai (717556)

            12 inches in a foot, but 3 feet in a yard - why?

            We prefer to ask "Why not?" ;)

            The only difference between the systems is that one is decimal-friendly and consistent, and another is not.

            That's not true. One was designed by the French and the other was not. That's all most Americans need to hear. I've often thought we should invent our own base ten measurement system and impose it on the rest of the world out of sheer spite ;) If they do make us switch to metric then the least we can do is come up with new names for the measurements. Millifreedom, centifreedom, freedom and kilofreedom sounds like a good replacement for millimeters, centimeters, meters and

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by YesIAmAScript (886271)

            There's one more difference. One system of measure has a group of people so convinced it's the best thing ever that they think the law should prohibit people from using any other.

            If the metric system is so great, why is it necessary to try to force people to use it? Let people use whatever measuring system they find most useful and if the metric system is better, it'll become dominant.

    • Re:Yeah? So? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by dakameleon (1126377) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @09:36PM (#29113815)

      [Metric system -] is the U.S. the *last* hold-out?

      Nope, you're in good company with Myanmar (Burma) and Liberia.

      (less facetiously, the UK still uses miles for distances and miles per hour for speed, and fair number of people still use feet & inches for human height)

  • by Dan East (318230) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @08:37PM (#29113387) Homepage Journal

    Y'all know that £20 isn't really half as much spending power as $40, right?

    • by rennerik (1256370)

      Y'all know that £20 isn't really half as much spending power as $40, right?

      Indeed, but TFA says in the UK they are paying (converting here to dollars) $107 USD for a full version of Windows 7, whereas here in the US we're paying $200 for a full version (and $120 for an upgrade).

      So the issue is, they're paying $93 less for a full version than we are, and on top of that, $13 less for a full version than we are for an upgrade.

      • My spidey-sense is tingling. I'm guessing that there will be an uproar, a lot, a whole lot, of press in the US about how unfair it is and then, tada, the US price actually comes in even lower than the UK price and they throw in a free churro - because USA-ians stick together and MS is just supporting business growth in the US and if only everyone will go out and buy it then democracy will come to the world and ...

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Oh, I see your all getting your panties in a bunch when someone else is getting it cheaper!

          What about Australia where I recall reading that Win7 is going to be substantially more expensive than the US (not sure about double, can't recall, but it was significantly more).

          Didn't here boo from you cunts then did we? Except maybe the lame droll about convicts, living upside down etc.

          dickheads...

  • by rennerik (1256370) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @08:38PM (#29113395)
    Dear Microsoft,

    I read recently that you have decided to cut Windows 7's price in the UK to about half of what it is here in the US. I don't feel that it does justice to us here in the States, as we're actually getting less value than your UK market.

    Take, for example, all the U's that have been dropped from words. My color is not colour, but yet, I have to pay more for the lack of the U. This is unfair. Has the cost of cutting U's from words taken a sharp climb?

    Perhaps the letter Z is charging too much these days, and I know how that can be. It only makes sparse appearances in words such as localize and marginalize, but despite its rare occurrence, it, much like a has-been movie star, has the gall to demand top billing. Perhaps your royalties payable to this (not)under-appreciated letter raise the costs here in the US.

    Whatever the reasoning, I still find it unfair, and being such a large and powerful corporation, the fact that you can be taken advantage of like this is not only sad, but reprehensible. Use those lawyers of yours and get back at them! Hey, you can even be on the winning end of an anti-trust suit... think of the headlines now: "'Z' Loses Anti-Trust Judgement Thanks to Microsoft". Won't that be good press?

    Sincerely,

    A Concerned Citizen

    PS - This message has been brought to you by the letter 5.
    • by Fluffeh (1273756) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @09:11PM (#29113619)
      Dear Citizen,

      We here at Microsoft take the utmost care when faced with queries such as yours.

      It is a little misunderstanding. While it is true that you aren't getting your full from the vowel U in the American version, we are including the other vowels I&E in it, which do actually not come packaged with the European version.

      I hope you find these two shiny vowels as valuable as we thought you would, and now understand the extra cost of the American version of the product.

      Sincerely,
      A Helpful Customer Servicer

      PS. This message has been brought to you by the number $107.
  • This is news? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Smoke2Joints (915787) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @08:39PM (#29113407) Homepage

    The price for my country was going to be twice that in the US, let alone the UK. I dont remember any outrage about that.

    Yea, it sucks, but other people most probably have it worse off than you do. Or they use linux.

    • Same in Denmark. Expensive and no family licence deals ...

      At least Microsoft aren't expecting people to pirate the damn thing ...

  • Not surprising (Score:5, Insightful)

    by WindBourne (631190) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @08:41PM (#29113421) Journal
    MS, like many American companies, are fleecing the country. We are regularly charged top prices for drugs, Windows software, Iron, Labor, etc. Heck, the neo-cons passed a drug policy that has the US gov paying the TOP dollar for the drugs, rather than the bottom, even though we are the largest customer. Absolutely ridiculous.
    • Price gouging ... (Score:5, Informative)

      by pbhj (607776) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @09:17PM (#29113671) Homepage Journal

      MS, like many American companies, are fleecing the country.

      GB prices for tech are usually close to the same number of pounds as dollars things have eased a bit recently, here are two random examples:
      * New Apple iPod Touch 8GB 2nd Generation (amazon UK), £152 = $250
      * ditto (amazon US), $215 -> UK one is only 16% more

      * Dell M17X laptop (UK), £1699 = $2815
      * ditto (US), $1799 -> saving $1000 by purchasing in the US vs in the UK where it is 56% more expensive

      Last year it was about $2 = £1; http://www.google.co.uk/finance?q=GBPUSD [google.co.uk]

      You were saying ...? This would make it even more extraordinary for Win 7 to be cheaper here, but when I look ...

      * Win 7 ultimate (amazon UK), £170 = $280
      * ditto (amazon US), $220 -> so only $60 / 27% more and the UK price is a "discounted" one from an RRP (recommended price) of £230

      Um?

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by teh kurisu (701097)

        The £152 price of the iPod Touch includes 15% VAT. The ex-VAT price is £132.17 (US$218.61).

        American advertised prices don't include sales tax, UK advertised prices do (or are marked as ex-VAT if they don't).

  • Vista upgrade? (Score:4, Informative)

    by RalphSleigh (899929) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @08:45PM (#29113439) Homepage

    According to amazon.co.uk, since I am running XP, I could get a vista home premium upgrade for £60, and they will throw in a full windows 7 home premium free..

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/feature.html/ref=amb_link_84366313_1?ie=UTF8&docId=1000321063&pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=special-product-offers-3&pf_rd_r=1N0XDYG13SRJD90788PR&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_p=470374053&pf_rd_i=B0013O54P8 [amazon.co.uk]

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by VVrath (542962)

      Why would running XP be a pre-requisite? If I'm reading Amazon's terms and conditions correctly, you only need to purchase a qualifying version of Vista (full or upgrade) to be eligible for a free (full) copy of Windows 7. It doesn't state anywhere that you have to install the version of Vista that you purchase...

      Wouldn't that mean that without owning any prior Microsoft OS you could purchase Vista Home Premium Upgrade for £60, avoid breaking the EULA by not installing it, and then install your shiny,

  • In the UK, a full version of Windows 7 Home Premium is going to cost less than half the price Americans will have to pay...

    Getting stiffed by Microsoft simply because you CAN pay more. I think that's hilarious. How are the Microsoft faithful going to spin this one?

    I've got a link for the Windows fanbois [angelfire.com].

  • Just wondering (Score:3, Insightful)

    by hyades1 (1149581) <hyades1@hotmail.com> on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @09:16PM (#29113657)

    Win7 is selling for half the price over 'ome? Does this mean UK residents are twice as smart as their American counterparts?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @09:36PM (#29113801)

    It's cheaper and you don't have to manually eradicate Internet Explorer?

    Where do I sign up?!

  • Amazon.co.uk: 169.98 GBP/281.66$ [amazon.co.uk]
    Amazon.com: 319.99$/193.11GBP [amazon.com]

    Not sure if the huge price difference between Home Premium and Ultimate is worth it though.

  • by gmuslera (3436) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @09:39PM (#29113835) Homepage Journal
    Don't matter a lot. It is still several times its cost, and thousands of times its value.
  • by Joe The Dragon (967727) on Tuesday August 18, 2009 @09:43PM (#29113859)

    so about the same as us oem price?

  • About time... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by geejayoh (1541771) on Wednesday August 19, 2009 @01:55AM (#29115425) Homepage
    So like the TFA says, for once the British aren't going to be screwed over by having to pay Yank prices in Sterling. At a time before the recession hit and the exchange rate was sitting nicely at US$2 for 1GBP this was sadly never translated into the Interenets SUper-Combobulating-Exchange-Calculator that all multi-nationals selling software or hardware in the UK and US seemed to use that seemed to be closer to a US$1 to GBP1 mapping. iTunes store and most Apple products being notable offenders. I for one am sick of being shafted for my lunch money by greedy companies.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by IBBoard (1128019)

      But this time it's the Americans on the receiving end of being over-charge for a product (for now). They're not used to it, so they feel it is unfair. Us Brits have got used to the fact that a lot of prices are basically taken at $1=£1, even if the exchange rate is closer to $2=£1 and given up hoping that prices would be adjusted accordingly.

  • About time too. (Score:3, Informative)

    by clickclickdrone (964164) on Wednesday August 19, 2009 @06:02AM (#29116491)
    For just about every other piece of software on the planet, the UK pays much more and often twice as much as the US does. Adobe are one of the worst in this respect but previous MS operating systems have been *far* cheaper in the US than here.

"I got everybody to pay up front...then I blew up their planet." "Now why didn't I think of that?" -- Post Bros. Comics

Working...