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Engineers Tell How Feedback Shaped Windows 7 452

Posted by samzenpus
from the what-do-you-want-today dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica took the time to talk to three members of the Windows 7 product development and planning team to find out how user feedback impacted the latest version of Windows. There's some market speak you'll have to wade through, but overall it gives a solid picture regarding the development of a Windows release."
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Engineers Tell How Feedback Shaped Windows 7

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  • by db32 (862117) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:12AM (#29834771) Journal
    We heard what you wanted and were sure to avoid those things at all costs. In the event that we could not avoid a given feature we made it practically impossible to use, moved the functionality to a new hidden location, or barrage you with popups and wizards to ensure you really want to use it.
    • Re:We Listened! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by j00r0m4nc3r (959816) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:15AM (#29834801)
      "With Windows 7, Microsoft made sure that every edition of its operating system would run on low-end hardware. "One of the feedbacks that we got was how different the needs were for users on laptops compared to needs of users on desktops,""

      Are you kidding me?! You're a company named Microsoft. You've been developing operating systems for 30 years. It took you this long to realize that different users have different needs, and that your OS should run on low-end hardware? And you only figured that out because of user feedback??
      /me boggles
      • I also loved how the guys didn't want to compare their current progress to the BlackComb hype from 8 years ago and Cairo before that.

        "Why waste good vaporware without a target to sink with it?"

      • Re:We Listened! (Score:4, Insightful)

        by runyonave (1482739) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:35AM (#29835003)
        It's Microsoft, they take a very long time to do anything right (or do anything at all). Just look at Internet Explorer, they have been working on it since 1994. 15 years later, we are still YET to receive a browser from Microsoft that is at least more than 20% web compliant. As a web developer this dearly pisses me off. How is that Firefox, Opera even Safari can get complaince in the 75%+ rating and not IE. Now that boggles my mind.
        • Re:We Listened! (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Again (1351325) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:58AM (#29835291)

          It's Microsoft, they take a very long time to do anything right (or do anything at all). Just look at Internet Explorer, they have been working on it since 1994. 15 years later, we are still YET to receive a browser from Microsoft that is at least more than 20% web compliant..

          Microsoft does have the technical resources to make IE score 100% on the Acid3 test. However, it is not in their best interests to do so. Here is a quote from Bill Gates (taken from wikiquotes) which demonstrates Microsoft's business strategy.

          One thing we have got to change in our strategy - allowing Office documents to be rendered very well by other peoples browsers is one of the most destructive things we could do to the company. We have to stop putting any effort into this and make sure that Office documents very well depends on PROPRIETARY IE capabilities.

          This is the attitude that Microsoft is developing software with. Just look at the number of businesses that are stuck with IE6 because of some legacy ActiveX application. Microsoft's strategy is working very well for them and I don't see them ever changing.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by ozmanjusri (601766)
        /me boggles

        Microsoft has a monopoly, they don't need to cater to users.

        Users have to adapt to Microsoft. Haven't you noticed?

        • Re:We Listened! (Score:5, Interesting)

          by jonbryce (703250) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:58AM (#29835283) Homepage

          Well not really. The sudden concern for netbook users was caused by the possibility that people might switch to linux. When the original linux powered Asus EEE PC was released, it was so popular, it pushed Microsoft into third place behind Apple and Xandros for OS shipments that month. I imagine that would give monkey-boy a bit of a fright.

          • Re:We Listened! (Score:5, Insightful)

            by PitaBred (632671) <slashdotNO@SPAMpitabred.dyndns.org> on Thursday October 22, 2009 @11:46AM (#29835999) Homepage
            And all they had to do to head that off was give away their 8 year old OS. No major skin off Microsoft's back, and they maintain lock-in. There probably wasn't even a chair thrown.
            • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

              by koiransuklaa (1502579)

              Oh, that may well turn out to be a major decision: if OEMs and end users now expect to get their (netbook) operating systems for ~$20, how can Microsoft raise the price to $100?

              That is a _major_ price hike for devices that now cost $200-$400 total...

              • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

                by PitaBred (632671)
                Because it's an 8 year old OS. People aren't expecting Windows 7 on a "netbook", and Microsoft is setting that expectation. They don't like netbooks... there's no margin. MS would prefer that people always look at them like toys, rather than what they actually are, which is more than adequate for 99% of what people do with their computers. People will still pay for the "real" OS because they're being told that Netbooks are toys, and nothing more.
          • When the original linux powered Asus EEE PC was released, it was so popular, it pushed Microsoft into third place behind Apple and Xandros for OS shipments that month. I imagine that would give monkey-boy a bit of a fright.

            Monkey-boy has the instincts and habits of a winner.*

            When the Atom netbook entered the market - typically with a larger screen, better keyboard, and twice the RAM and storage space of the competition - the Linux netbook was drop-kicked into the dumpsters behind your local WalMart.

            For the

            • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

              by jedidiah (1196)

              > When the Atom netbook entered the market - typically with a larger screen, better keyboard,
              > and twice the RAM and storage space of the competition - the Linux netbook was drop-kicked
              > into the dumpsters behind your local WalMart.

              Yes... much beefier hardware. It bears little resemblance to the original EEE 900 really.

              It bears repeating that Dell still sells a lot of Linux netbooks. They actually load
              Linux on the newer hardware. They didn't just abandon Linux outright as if their use
              of it was all

            • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

              When the Atom Netbook came out, Asus' Linux netbooks were still better specced for the same price, and it would be a few months before Acer and Dell would cut options off Linux books, HP still has the fully powered linux option outside the American continent (which is admittedly better than the HP VIA netbook did) and only MSI had fudded because they were too moronic to do as a corporation what a few million users easily had done on their own.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by jzhos (1043516)
        MS bashing aside, they don't have to make sure the new OS run on the low-end hardware at the beginning of each release cycle, before the netbook thing took off and CPU has to be multicore to keep improving. In the good old days, developer don't need to worry about the lower end of the hardware during planning. The OS release is rather a long development cycle (at least for Windows), 3-4 years. When the new release comes out, the high-end machines during planning phase are already the lower end. Companies w
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by default luser (529332)

          Absolutely. Intel looked like they were going to start producing "decent" integrated graphics when, in 2004, they announced the GMA 900. It looked to Microsoft like the world's largest GPU maker would finally have something capable of desktop compositing, so they figured they could finally add this capability to Windows without a huge performance hit.

          Then, in 2006 Intel announced the GMA X3000, but couldn't produce drivers to enable the advanced features like Vertex Shaders (this took eighteen months). I

      • Re:We Listened! (Score:4, Insightful)

        by UnknowingFool (672806) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @11:48AM (#29836033)

        Remember MS has never concerned themselves with consumers; for the most part consumers are not their customers. Companies were their customers for businesses. On the consumer side, OEMs are their customers. Either way, MS never dealt as much with direct consumer support and interaction. If there were support issues, companies' IT departments took care of their business users and OEMs handled the consumers. With Vista, this came back to hurt them as OEMs could simply blame MS on the whole fiasco especially when consumers could downgrade to XP and see a significant performance and stability improvements.

        MS also gambled that minimum hardware would advance more than their new OS would bog it down. With every release, MS would redefine what "minimum" hardware requirements meant. With Win95 and 98, minimum meant Windows may be slower if the user was doing processor intensive. More memory would definitely fix it. With XP, "minimum" meant that Windows would be slower especially if the user was doing processor intensive. More memory would fix most things. By the time of Vista, minimum meant you could load Windows onto the machine. Good luck on actually running anything but the OS. More memory might fix it, but CPU and video card upgrades were more likely necessary which meant it would be cheaper for the user to buy a new computer or downgrade to XP rather than upgrade their computer to actually use Vista.

        • Re:We Listened! (Score:5, Interesting)

          by hairyfeet (841228) <bassbeast1968@gma i l . com> on Thursday October 22, 2009 @12:52PM (#29836915) Journal

          I'd say what really bit them in the ass with Vista was the whole "Vista capable" fiasco. I am sitting here staring at a Compaq Presario that I got for a whole $50 because the customer absolutely HATED Vista and wanted that box taken out of his sight. Those Worst Buy Vista capable machines really were a very bad joke.

          We are talking a 1.8GHz Sempron, a measly 512Mb of RAM, and an ultra cheapo SiS IGP, anybody who has ever run Vista knows there is NO WAY in hell that thing will EVER run Vista at an acceptable speed, instead the customers would quickly get frustrated as the machine thrashed away (this particular box was even given a 250Gb hard drive upgrade from Compaq because it thrashed the original drive to death) and would quickly either dump the machine for a new XP box or bring it to somebody like me and say "get this Vista POS off and put XP on!"

          So if MSFT wants to know who is to blame for folks hating Vista like the second coming of WinME, they just need to look in the mirror. Sure on a dual core with 2Gb+ of RAM it'll run decently, but the "Best Buy Specials" being sold at the time of the Vista release were single core Sempron and Celeron with 512Mb of RAM and really lousy Intel or SiS IGPs. Those machines should have NEVER had Vista come within a 1000 yards of it, yet MSFT let manufacturers put "Vista capable" on them along with that piece of trash Vista Basic and customers felt like they were scammed, which of course they were. I have many customers now with new XP duals and Quads and they are not looking at Windows 7 until 2012, if at all. Too many got burnt thanks to Vista Capable and are just gonna set out Windows 7.

          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by dwiget001 (1073738)

            || So if MSFT wants to know who is to blame for folks hating Vista like the second coming of WinME, they just need to look in the mirror. Sure on a dual core with 2Gb+ of RAM it'll run decently, but the "Best Buy Specials" being sold at the time of the Vista release were single core Sempron and Celeron with 512Mb of RAM and really lousy Intel or SiS IGPs. Those machines should have NEVER had Vista come within a 1000 yards of it, yet MSFT let manufacturers put "Vista capable" on them along with that piece of

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by hairyfeet (841228)

              Oh I agree that MSFT deserves the blame, as it is their OS and they wrote the minimum system requirements, which lets be honest here-while MSFT minimum system requirements have always been "off" the ones they put for Vista were so wrong I don't see how it could be labeled as anything but bold faced lies designed to push their new OS (which of course cost more than XP to the OEMs) onto machines that could NEVER run it.

              Now I have actually had to use machines with XP that were slightly over the minimum specs [wikipedia.org] C

  • Yes (Score:5, Funny)

    by homey of my owney (975234) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:13AM (#29834775)
    Ummm.... We'd like it not to crash.
    • Re:Yes (Score:5, Funny)

      by L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:37AM (#29835035)
      I'm fairly sure they would too :)
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by berwiki (989827)
      oh come on now. Since XP was released the random 'crashing' isn't prevalent any more.
      If you have bad hardware or are overclocking, that is a different story, but also your own fault.
      Lets be reasonable, this is like a wife of 30 years, bringing up stuff you did in high school!
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Cro Magnon (467622)

      Actually, the crashes weren't all bad. Back when I was using W95 at work, I took coffee breaks every time it crashed in the morning. Of course I paid for it; I was in the bathroom during its afternoon crashes.

  • Feedback (Score:5, Funny)

    by Thanshin (1188877) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:16AM (#29834809)

    We took all the feedback.
    Printed it.
    Made bricks with the printed feedback and some glue.
    Built a piramid with the bricks.
    Painted it green and brown.
    Called it Mount Feedji.
    Burned it down in a massive party.

    Then, still drunk from the party, we designed W7.

    .

    Ok, that was a lie. We didn't actually paint it. But we considered that suggestion for quite a long while.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:19AM (#29834831)

    Windows 7 plain rocks. Seems like Windows 2000 just got reincarnated and polished.

    I've been running it for a while now and have no issues.

    • by Mashiki (184564) <mashiki@gma[ ]com ['il.' in gap]> on Thursday October 22, 2009 @12:13PM (#29836343) Homepage

      I'm actually not sure how this got to +4 funny. Maybe +5 interesting? I digress. I've been a fan of Win2k for a long time, I used it for just about everything from gaming to my work up until XP64 and had a stable driver set. Does Win7 have that nifty feel of Win2k? Yes actually it does. Even on lower end hardware it's decently snappy, and runs well.

      Issues? The biggest I've found is it's ability to lose connection to the internet on reboots. Meaning you need to disable and reenable your network card which fixes it. Sadly no new drivers for my card, but otherwise works fine. I consider that a 2 on my 1-10(10 being worst) scale of crap. Otherwise, I'm quite happy. My XP64 machine has been up and running for a bit more than 460 days now without a reboot. I expect that Win7 will beat that easily.

  • MS moves fast (Score:4, Insightful)

    by gEvil (beta) (945888) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:22AM (#29834859)
    Over a decade ago, feedback for Microsoft software took place by filling out surveys on paper and floppy disks sent in to the company's headquarters. The ubiquity of the Internet has led to more feedback, faster.

    And yet they could have used the Internet for feedback well more than a decade ago. Glad to see they've finally entered the mid-90s.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by lordandmaker (960504)
      Come on, they're at least in the late nineties by now. They've got support for 64-bit architectures and everything!
  • by Coopjust (872796) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:23AM (#29834869)
    7 truly is Vista SP3. And I don't say that in a negative fashion; Vista runs very well on my two desktops and laptop.

    However, minus the new taskbar (which I think is a massive step forward), there really isn't that much that's new. A little bit faster, a little bit less buggy.

    In the end, 7 is Mojave Experiment 2.0. Microsoft tried an ad campaign, it failed because people wouldn't get over how "bad Vista is". Microsoft gives it new clothes and a new name- now it's the best version of Windows EVER!

    In short, Microsoft went back to marketing after the Vista launch floundered and destroyed its reputation (due to a bunch of underpowered computers with poorly written drivers giving the OS a bad reputation).
    • by Dan667 (564390)
      microsoft not understanding what Customers want to do with an OS is not the Customers fault. If there were minimum specs to run it then the OS should just refuse to install if the hardware does not meet them. Vista got a bad reputation, because it was bad.
      • by Coopjust (872796)
        Oh, MS totally shot themselves in the foot by putting out minimum requirements for OEMs to stamp on PCs that the computer was "Vista Capable", and for disabling driver signing in x86 versions of Windows. Not debating that.

        Vista wasn't inherently bad. MS just put out minimum specs that were way too low and didn't enforce driver quality.
        • by Dan667 (564390) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:52AM (#29835199)
          in spite of the hardware problems, I have used vista and I hated it. Why do I have to re-learn everything because microsoft wants to try to sell more copies of an OS? It should make you life easier, not harder. And completely ignoring things like boot time, security, and backwards comparability (the things the Customer actually cares about), while bending over backwards to make sure DRM for hollywood is in the OS is really just shooting yourself in the foot.
          • by Blakey Rat (99501)

            Why do I have to re-learn everything because microsoft wants to try to sell more copies of an OS?

            What did you have to re-learn?

            The thing most amazing to me about Windows is how similar every version is, and yet how many people claim there's this massive amount of retraining needed. Retraining for what!? The UI is almost identical to XP, except looking slightly different. The differences are so trivial that if you have Vista in "Classic" mode, and compared it to XP in "Classic" mode, you can't even tell the

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Well, yeah.

      Win 2000 = NT 5.0
      Win XP = NT 5.1
      Win Vista = NT 6.0
      Win 7 = NT 6.1

      What did people expect. It's not a new iteration, it's an enhancement. Just because they brand it as a new OS does not make it so.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Jugalator (259273)

        What did people expect. It's not a new iteration, it's an enhancement. Just because they brand it as a new OS does not make it so.

        MS (Steven Sinofsky to be precise) has officially claimed that the kernel version number of 6.1 is only for compatibility reasons, for apps only looking at the major OS version number, and that it otherwise would have been an "NT 7.0". I can't be bothered to find the article now, but some careful Googling on the "Engineering Windows 7" blog would do the trick.

    • 7 truly is Vista SP3.

      The line is always fuzzy and subjective. Was XP a "service pack for 2000"? Is the difference between pre-SP XP and 2000 really that much bigger than that between 7 and Vista?

  • Nothing to see here (Score:5, Informative)

    by headhot (137860) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:25AM (#29834889) Homepage

    Its a pretty useless article. You don't get any more info out of the article then you get from the title.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by dunezone (899268)
      Customer complained about feature "x", we evaluated feature "x", we concluded the customer was correct and we corrected feature "x" to customers suggestion.

      Customer Support 101
    • That's why they call it astroturf.

  • Dear God... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by X.25 (255792) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:48AM (#29835171)

    Windows 7 is another proof that enough marketing can make something good.

    Windows 7, Windows 7, Windows 7, ...

    I yet have to find someone who can show me what it brings me, over XP, that is worth paying 100+ EUR for.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      Continued support?

    • Honestly as a home user you get ipv6 (which you may not really benefit from if you're behind an ipv4 router), self-healing NTFS, DirectX 11, a new taskbar (which is admittedly pretty neat) and not a whole lot more.

      You get continued security updates for a longer period of time.

      Is it worth paying to upgrade?

      Probably not. I bought a copy for DirectX 11 because the only reason I keep Windows around for is gaming. I also got the upgrade when it was $50 (USD) so it was a much easier pill to swallow. Your mileage

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by TheRaven64 (641858)
        IPv6 is available for XP as a download from MS. Self-healing NTFS might be nice, although I'm not really sure what it means; NTFS has had journaling for a long time, does this add per-block checksums and error correction? DirectX 11 is only really relevant to games with a recent GPU. And a new taskbar? That's really stretching it.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by AaronW (33736)

      I recently switched my HP Mini netbook from XP to the 7 RC.
      I have found that some things are just more stable. Hibernate, for example, seems to work a lot better and works faster. It's much improved over XP. It's definitely been more stable and it's a number of little things I notice that are improvements, besides the improved task bar.

      Memory wise, Windows 7 Ultimate it doesn't seem to use much more than what I was using with XP Home. If anything, the memory management feels like its improved quite a bit.

      A

  • by tenzig_112 (213387) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @10:56AM (#29835259) Homepage

    I get the impression that the Windows 7 launch is a lot like seeing an old girlfriend suddenly show up on your doorstep wanting to get back together. She's had some work done, apparently: stomach stapling to take off some of the weight, breast augmentation, and a radical nosejob to make her look as much like your current girlfriend as medical science will allow.

    She's pretty, of course, almost too pretty. She still wears far too much makeup and carries that desperate look in her eyes. The fragrant haze around her is the perfume she overuses to mask the scent of failure.

    But standing there in that low-cut top, you'd almost forget for a moment what a psycho she was- how she used to shut down in the middle of a date and forget everything you were talking about and how she was only happy when you were buying her things. You'd almost forget about carrying around her legacy baggage or those nights when, for seemingly no reason at all, she would simply stop speaking to you and when you asked what was wrong she'd just spit a string of hex code at you and expect you to figure it out.

    You complained about her for years before finally deciding to get rid of her, and here she is again. Though, somehow she seems like a completely different person now.

    "I'm up here," she says when she catches you staring at her chest.

    Tempted though you may be, you know that over time she'll get bored and slow down on you just like she always does. And then you'll be right back where you started: trapped. She keeps you by convincing you that you don't have a choice. You're just not smart enough for one option or rich enough to afford the other.

    "But I'm different now," she says, batting her eyes innocently. "I've changed."

    Indeed she has. Apparently, she's really into Cabala now or something like that. It's helped her discover loads of untapped potential in herself. But it also means that you'll have to buy all new furniture to fit with her understanding of feng shui. That's not the only change she has in store for you. The minute you let her move in, she'll have a new alarm system put in that succeeds only in preventing your friends from coming over on poker night.

    She doesn't love you, but she doesn't hate you, either. The truth is that she couldn't care less one way or the other. She's here because she doesn't want to be alone. Like all human beings, especially those well past their prime, she wants to feel wanted and, after a string of lost jobs and bad investments, she needs a place to stay.

    But all in all, she's OK. She's a seven. She'll do, I guess.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by ZinnHelden (1549931)

      You'd almost forget about carrying around her legacy baggage or those nights when, for seemingly no reason at all, she would simply stop speaking to you and when you asked what was wrong she'd just spit a string of hex code at you and expect you to figure it out.

      Seems like a lot of /.'ers would find women easier to comprehend if this were the case.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by coolmoose25 (1057210)
      I wish I had mod points and that the parent wasn't already at +5... Wow. Just Wow.
    • by Comatose51 (687974) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @11:38AM (#29835865) Homepage
      Had me up until "is a lot like seeing an old girlfriend " and I lost any sense of reference of what you're talking about.
    • +1, insightful (Score:3, Informative)

      by caseih (160668)

      Too bad this brilliant little piece of prose is already rated at +5, Funny. In reality it should be +5, Insightful. It is both funny and insightful. So close to the truth as far as most people's relationship with Windows goes that it actually hurts! Best comment I think I've ever read on slashdot. Bravo.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by WiiVault (1039946)
      Cheers friend. The best post I have seen on /. in years.
    • by vulgrin (70725) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @01:21PM (#29837309) Homepage Journal

      Lets continue the analogy:

      Your OSX Girlfriend shows up on your doorstep telling you to buy her a new Snow Leopard coat. Oh, and you are going to need to get her some updated pants and shoes too to match. Of course, she won't step inside your door until you've gone and bought one of those new Apple brand "iMansions" that, really, is just the same as the Intel Houses that everyone has, but comes with fancy aluminum siding and costs twice as much. You could TRY to put aluminum siding on any old Intel house, but you hear those contractors are getting sued out of business.

      So, you finally get the new mansion and invite her in and you realize that she's really just like every other girl you've been with. But, all your friends like her, so you might as well go along with it. She's arty, but very serious too, and won't play any games with you. After a while, after buying her all her iAccessories you realize you really aren't getting any more out of her than your other girlfriends.

      But your Linux girlfriend, she is awesome. She'll do whatever you want, whenever you want, rarely complains and will stay in pretty much any house or mobile home you have. Sadly, she's also a robot who gets delivered to your house in a box, and you have to assemble her up the way you want. You have to turn to your friends and the internet to find out why the heck she won't talk with you, or why her feet are on backwards. She's very secure in your relationship, so much that she won't do anything unless you really PROVE you are her boyfriend. She plays a few games, but you're getting sick of chess, solitaire and downhill sledding penguins. And then every few weeks you have to shut her down to replace her heart and lungs. You are so damn tired keeping her running and happy all the time who has time for sex?

      To top it off, everyone has seen her naked. She's put it all over the Internet for everyone to see and fiddle with her naughty bits. She claims it makes her a better woman, but since you have to keep patching her up, you aren't so sure. What's worse, she keeps comparing you to some guy she met in Finland and talks about how much he "got inside her."

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by turing_m (1030530)

      Genius.

  • Waffle? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Burnhard (1031106)
    The article waffled on a bit and at the end of it I'd learnt absolutely nothing, because they didn't actually say anything.
  • by FlopEJoe (784551) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @11:00AM (#29835321)
    Can I just have a 64-bit windows operating system that will keep up with the latest graphics drivers. And bring back classic XP Window's Explorer... I hate Vista's Explorer with a passion. If you change something, make a classic version!
    • Amen! (Score:3, Insightful)

      by tacokill (531275)
      I am astounded at how bad file explorer is in Vista. That single program is probably the reason I have not "upgraded" yet. I use file explorer all the time so I am especially sensitive to this change.

      I will never understand how file explorer gets WORSE as you go higher in releases. How is that possible?!?! Is there somekind of grand MSFT strategy to wean people from file explorer entirely? I just don't understand a computer operating system that does not allow easy navigation of its file and fold
  • Perhaps this is a bit of a troll, but it comes from frustration using the products...

    I notice in TFA that the photo is of, what looks to be, a fifth grade classroom. Is this the target audience for Windows 7? I mean the commercials - er commercial - seems to be of that seven-year-old girl making a pink-pony presentation.

    I'm confused. Is Windows 7 and Office 2007 -- which I hate, by the way (shakes fist) curse you "ribbon"! -- suppose to be so simple a seven-year-old can use it, or so simple that only

  • "...we had the pleasure of talking with...members of the Windows 7 product development and planning team: ...Cameron Turner, Group Program Manager for Telemetry."
    He must coordinate the product launches with Houston.

  • Lack of feedback (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Enderandrew (866215) <enderandrew&gmail,com> on Thursday October 22, 2009 @11:11AM (#29835485) Homepage Journal

    I don't want to sound like a broken record here, but one of the things I truly love about OSS development is how transparent development is. I can easily contact the developers. I can submit bugs.

    I have tons of usability gripes with Windows. I've never felt like I could submit feedback to Microsoft that might be seen and looked at.

  • "Last night, we had the pleasure of talking with three members of the Windows 7 product development and planning team"

    There's you problem right their, no mention of the people who actually write the code, and it's a little late to the party to figure out that the end users might have a clue as to what they want. A simple uncluttered desktop that does what you want.
    -------

    Key Words:

    beta feedback, beta testers , bugs were squashed, change, compatibility,, data-gathering, development principles, discu
  • ... I am surprised that Ars Technica fell for being Microsoft's tool.
  • I wonder if the vista engineers got my suggestion and stabbed themselve in the face.

  • by sys_mast (452486) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @11:36AM (#29835847)

    ...that came from this feedback, that makes businesses using XP want to switch? We all know why NOBODY switched to Vista, so why would anyone switch to win7?

    Please, I'm not asking why should NOT switch, we all know that answer. But someone please explain why we SHOULD move to win7 !

  • by hey (83763) on Thursday October 22, 2009 @01:48PM (#29837735) Journal

    This was something I noticed when Vista came out...

    To make application I have written have the Vista Aero look I had to recompile. But I noticed that my old version of Microsoft Excel (2003) has the new look. So there must be some code in in Vista that handles Microsoft projects nicer. Which doesn't seem fair.

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