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Tesla Roadster Breaks Distance Record For Electric Car 392

Posted by Soulskill
from the eternal-sunshine-and-a-spotless-road dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The CEO of an Australian ISP has driven his Tesla Roadster into the record books, completing 501km on a single electric charge in the 2009 Global Green Challenge — beating the Roadster's official specifications, which rate the all-electric sports car as being capable of a maximum of 390km per charge. The previous record was held by another Roadster in the 387km Rallye Monte Carlo d'Energies Alternatives in April this year. In a race specifically designed for alternative energy vehicles (such as hydrogen and electricity), the Roadster was the only vehicle to complete the entire course. Though to be fair, that race course was a mixture of twists, turns and hills."
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Tesla Roadster Breaks Distance Record For Electric Car

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  • To be fair? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @08:34AM (#29896201)

    To be fair, these cars were expected to turn, and go up and down hills. Something no mere mortal car would dare perform...

    • Re:To be fair? (Score:4, Informative)

      by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohn AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @08:40AM (#29896309) Journal

      To be fair, these cars were expected to turn, and go up and down hills. Something no mere mortal car would dare perform...

      I think what they mean was that it requires less electricity to remain straight on a flat plane going at a fixed speed. When you slow down to complete an S-curve or start going up a hill, your fuel consumption is drastically affected. The driver of the Tesla Roadster kept the speed as close to 55 kmph as he could to achieve the best efficiency event though that's a modest pace and not really a racing speed. This wasn't a course making long straight lines through the salt flats and that's probably important to note. I don't think "race" is a good description for the course. It's more like a realistic challenge with completion time hardly a factor.

      • That's true. Real-world driving and efficiency driving are hugely different. My Honda Insight Hybrid has been successfully driven over 1500 miles (twice specification), but in the real world the best I've ever done is 1000, and the national average from Insight drivers is only ~500 miles.

        I think EVs need to be more strictly regulated in their mileage claims. Let them go on the same treadmill as they gasoline/diesel cars must ride.

      • by l3v1 (787564)
        I think what they mean was that it requires less electricity to remain straight on a flat plane going at a fixed speed.When you slow down to complete an S-curve or start going up a hill, your fuel consumption is drastically affected.

        Yet, we shouldn't forget that this is still far from real life performance. The closest thing might be highway use in low traffic. No chance of driving 500 km, not even 390 km, in an urban environment, or in every day mixed high traffic city+highway use.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Algan (20532)

          Actually, I wouldn't be so sure. Urban driving means low speeds, which means lower air drag. Also, stop and go gives regenerative braking a chance to do its job. I wouldn't be surprised if an electric car would go further in city driving than on the highway...

          • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

            by MrNaz (730548) *

            The laws of thermodynamics state that regenerative breaking can only capture *some* of the energy lost in slowing down. One will never get as much range in city driving than in highway driving. Mainly because in this house, Lisa, we obey the laws of thermodynamics.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by Rising Ape (1620461)

              The regenerative braking doesn't involve a heat engine, so in principle you could get arbitrarily close to 100% energy recovery given sufficiently advanced technology. IIRC, hybrids do get better range in urban driving.

              • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

                by MrNaz (730548) *

                Wrong. Just because thermodynamics has "thermo" in it doesn't mean the laws only apply to heat.

                • by Grokmoo (1180039)
                  No, he is right. The reason you can't always get close to 100% is because of something called Carnot efficiency.

                  Carnot Cycle [wikipedia.org]

                  However, in this situation, that doesn't apply. There is no reason you cannot collect very close to 100% of the energy from braking using your regenerative braking system. There will of course be some loss due to efficiency in the air resistance and rolling resistance. Also, current regenerative braking technology doesn't apply enough force at slow speeds to stop the car in
                • So perhaps you'd like to explain what thermodynamic limits apply to regenerative braking?

                  First law - conservation of energy. You can't get any more energy back than there is kinetic energy of the car, but you can get arbitrarily close.

                  Second law - (roughly) no spontaneous entropy decreases in a closed system. Converting kinetic energy to electrical or chemical does not inherently involve entropy changes (chemical may, but it will be reversible).

                  So, where does the inevitable loss come in then?

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by pnewhook (788591)

              One will never get as much range in city driving than in highway driving.

              Definitely not true with hybrids. Reason is that at highway speeds the gasoline engine is always on, whereas if I keep it under 60km/h, the electric kick in which is more efficient.

            • Re:To be fair? (Score:4, Informative)

              by Wonko the Sane (25252) * on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @10:35AM (#29898075) Journal

              The laws of thermodynamics state that regenerative breaking can only capture *some* of the energy lost in slowing down. One will never get as much range in city driving than in highway driving. Mainly because in this house, Lisa, we obey the laws of thermodynamics.

              You will get more range in the city than highway, unless you drive as slow on the highway as you do in the city.

              The reason that city driving in a hybrid or electric vehicle can be more efficient than highway is because the inefficiency of the regeneration is overpowered by the reduced wind resistance.

        • Yet, we shouldn't forget that this is still far from real life performance

          Yeah, like driving to the mailbox.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by MrMr (219533)
        The driver of the Tesla Roadster kept the speed as close to 55 kmph as he could
        Yup, that must have been that guy in the left lane this morning.
  • I only wish I could afford one.
  • That's nice... (Score:3, Informative)

    by Blazarov (894987) <blazarov&mail,bg> on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @08:37AM (#29896245)
    What the summary fails to mention is also that the average speed was at about 55 km/h, which is pretty decent...
    • by Mikkeles (698461) on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @08:40AM (#29896297)

      ... and downhill, both directions ;^)

    • average speed was at about 55 km/h, which is pretty decent...

      Only if by "pretty decent" you mean half the speed of a gasoline-powered car.

    • by MBGMorden (803437)

      Not for any long distance. I do some travelling throughout the year - not extreme, but maybe 4 trips per year. Usually at least once per year I'll go from Charleston, SC to Miami, FL. At 80mph(~130km/h) on the interstate that drive is a bit long, but perfectly doable. At 35mph (~ the 55km/h speed here) it simply wouldn't be doable without stopping and spending the night. That's an extra day off from work, and extra night in a hotel, and extra hassle.

      Don't get me wrong I'm all for electric, but only so l

      • Re:That's nice... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by pnewhook (788591) on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @09:52AM (#29897413)

        and that when I'm out of power I can stop and have full power again (either through rapid charging or a battery swap) within 15 minutes or less

        Personally, I'm looking forward to the time when I go to my electric car after work that has been parked in the parking lot all day, and the battery is fully charged for free from the solar panels. THAT is what the oil companies are really afraid of.

  • That bad, eh? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by bill_mcgonigle (4333) * on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @08:39AM (#29896283) Homepage Journal

    313 miles is almost exactly the range of my '99 Subaru Outback Legacy (15-gallon tank), which is worth about $2500 now. Except I can easily refuel that and keep going. The trip to my folks' house is 365 miles.

    I had assumed that with all the talk of new technology Tesla was going to be comparable with the hybrids. This article helps re-adjust my expectations, but it also gives me hope that by time they're generally affordable the range will be there too.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by aicrules (819392)
      Yeah imagine the first time you run out of charge 10 miles from the nearest town. Walking into that convenience store hoping they have a HUGE sale on extension cords because carrying 15 gallons of electricity 10 miles is a dangerous task.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by hattig (47930)

        This is why I think Tesla should market to Europe more - smaller countries, smaller distances driven, and far more green-friendly governments and policies.

        Also you would hope that the GPS would be linked to capacity and tell you if you can make it, and where recharge stations are en-route.

        However I'm a fan of having an on-board small-capacity traditional engine that is used solely as a generator rather than being tied into the complexities of the car propulsion system. If that would generate enough charge t

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by TooMuchToDo (882796)
          They do market to Europe, and the Tesla Roadster is actually cheaper there due to currency valuation differences (euro & the pound > dollar).
        • by relguj9 (1313593)

          This is why I think Tesla should market to Europe more - smaller countries, smaller distances driven, and far more green-friendly governments and policies.

          Also you would hope that the GPS would be linked to capacity and tell you if you can make it, and where recharge stations are en-route.

          However I'm a fan of having an on-board small-capacity traditional engine that is used solely as a generator rather than being tied into the complexities of the car propulsion system. If that would generate enough charge to let me limp those ten miles it might be okay.

          And in ten years, when the technology is affordable, hopefully the technology will have matured to a point where none of this is an issue. Even to the point of solar roofing options for trickle charging during the day (and simultaneously keeping the car cool inside). Not that this option would help me in Britain...

          I wouldn't even categorize the Tesla as "short distance", it is more "medium distance". It travels about the same distance as most cars do on a single tank of gas. How often do most people really use up an entire tank of gas in one day, I don't have the stats but I'd bet my shirt they are the exception. The convenience of not having to stop at the gas station once a week would be amazing as well.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by jbezorg (1263978)

        HUGE sale on extension cords...

        "sale"? You, my friend, have never been a service station off an interstate that extorts the hapless souls who trudge in and who are in need of a gas can.

    • Re:That bad, eh? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Tim4444 (1122173) on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @09:03AM (#29896667)
      Does every car have to be general purpose? People don't complain that the Mini Cooper can't hold a family of 6 or haul their 5th wheel. They know it has a purpose and a niche and get over it. Anyone who can afford a Tesla probably has multiple vehicles as does the average middle class family. Now, brace yourself. It's possible to own an electric car and a gas car. wow. Don't give me this soviet russia 'one car for everyone and every purpose' bs. I want choices. A lot of families own at least one car that they never drive more than 300 miles in a single day. Some people will choose a car that never needs to go to the gas station, never needs oil changes, and works great for all their local commuting.

      I had assumed that with all the talk of new technology

      Next time try reading up on it instead. Some people assumed with all the talk of new technology that by the year 2000 we'd all be driving flying cars and we'd have colonies on the moon...

      • Some people assumed with all the talk of new technology that by the year 2000 we'd all be driving flying cars and we'd have colonies on the moon...

        Instead we got a date bug.

        I was emotionally devastated, believe you me.

      • Re:That bad, eh? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Red Flayer (890720) on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @09:45AM (#29897295) Journal

        Now, brace yourself. It's possible to own an electric car and a gas car. wow. Don't give me this soviet russia 'one car for everyone and every purpose' bs. I want choices. A lot of families own at least one car that they never drive more than 300 miles in a single day. Some people will choose a car that never needs to go to the gas station, never needs oil changes, and works great for all their local commuting.

        Why not just rent a specialized vehicle when you need one?

        Hauling stuff to the dump / stuff from Home Depot / stuff from a big box store? Rent a van for $20.
        Traveling a few states to visit family? Taking a long road trip? Rent an appropriate car.

        The little extra utility most people get on rare occasion from having a Canyonero (or even a smaller SUV/minivan) is ridiculous... far better fiscally to drive a commuter car and rent a special purpose car when one is needed. Especially once you factor in wear-and-tear from those "special need" trips.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Paul Carver (4555)

          Hauling stuff to the dump / stuff from Home Depot / stuff from a big box store? Rent a van for $20.

          FYI, that $20 is only if you keep it in the parking lot of the place you rent from. I just rented from U-Haul a couple weeks ago and despite that big "rent me for $20" emblazoned on the side the charge on my credit card was approx $95. Plus I had to stop off at a gas station to put $5 worth of gas in it before returning it because they charge something like a $30 penalty if you return it with less gas than it had in it when you rented it. I guess some U-Haul places may also sell gas, but this one didn't so

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by jackbird (721605)
            Depends where you live. Philly car share and Zipcars will rent you a pickup truck at a very reasonable hourly rate. So will Home Depot and Lowes, for that matter.
      • Does every car have to be general purpose?

        No, but it's probably fair to say that every $100,000 car ought to be general purpose.

    • by Algan (20532)

      Tesla Roadster is more like a proof of concept/exotic car. Electric cars don't (yet) make sense as long haul vehicles, simply because the infrastructure for recharging them is not there yet. Not to mention charge times measured in hours vs minutes. I don't see people hanging around at highway recharge stations for hours. But they do make perfect sense as commuter cars, and, for that, a range of 300 miles is good enough for even the most extreme commuters.

      • Re:That bad, eh? (Score:5, Interesting)

        by shway (1614667) * on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @09:49AM (#29897369)
        I have just passed the 15,000 mile mark in my 5 month old Tesla Roadster. My commute in it is almost 100 miles a day. People who claim that the Roadster is not a viable car due to range concerns have never tried to use one. I drive more than anyone else I know, and will likely put 35,000 miles on it this year. The Roadster is a blast to drive, and is definitely up to the task. The convenience of always having a full tank when I get in it in the morning is far better than doing the same commute in my previous car where each day I had to check to see if I had to stop by a gas station. It is true that I cannot easily take it for cross country roadtrips - but any 2 seater roadster doesn't lend itself for long family vacations. I have a second car for that. Just like I plan to take an alternate vehicle to Hawaii, I am content to take another vehicle on the occasional long trip. "Oh noes! Why would anyone buy that Toyota - you can't drive it across the Pacific!"
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Rei (128717)

          Just don't enjoy it too much. Way too many Roadsters have been totaled already. Often from people having too much fun with that accelerator pedal. ;)

          Survivability appears very good, however. You see the photos of the Roadster rear-ended by a Prius at 50mph (Most Fuel Efficient Accident Ever(TM))? Completely crushed the rear end and pushed it *under a Touareg*. The passenger compartment remained completely intact with the Touareg sitting on top of it.

      • by Lumpy (12016)

        Exactly! even "green/renewable" companies and buildings are HOSTILE to electric cars. I work at the GVSU renewable energy building in west michigan. Is there a place for me to plug in my electric car? nope. They have solar, a microturbine and a natural gas fuel cell that can power a small town... they wont let me plug in and charge my electric. it's against "building policy"

        It will require forcing building owners to stop being jerks as well.

    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      I'll bet if you set your cruise control to 33 mph (the speed they ran this car on) you'd go farther.

    • by relguj9 (1313593)

      313 miles is almost exactly the range of my '99 Subaru Outback Legacy (15-gallon tank), which is worth about $2500 now. Except I can easily refuel that and keep going. The trip to my folks' house is 365 miles.

      I had assumed that with all the talk of new technology Tesla was going to be comparable with the hybrids. This article helps re-adjust my expectations, but it also gives me hope that by time they're generally affordable the range will be there too.

      Well, for ME, this car IS general purpose. I haven't driven more than 150 miles in a single day in probably 4 years. And when I did, it was because my job required me to and I was getting paid by the mile or had the option of renting.

      If you are planning on hauling your family across multiple states (or longways across a really big state) then this vehicle definitely isn't for you. However, I can't imagine it costing that much to rent or just buy a cheap van and keep it in the garage for the times you

  • by Locke2005 (849178) on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @08:41AM (#29896319)
    501km = 311 miles, about the range most gasoline vehicles get on a tank of gas. If it was affordable, this would definitely make a viable replacement for a petroleum fueled vehicle. Now, if we could just do something about the cost of the batteries so that average people could buy one...
    • If it was affordable, this would definitely make a viable replacement for a petroleum fueled vehicle.

      I don't know about you but when I travel long distances on the highway I expect a 500 km trip to take about 4.5 hours, not 9 hours.

      I love the Tesla but battery technology needs to improve its capacity/weight ratio by about 20 before electric vehicles will be equilivant to gasoline powered vehicles for long distance highway travel.

      • by cduffy (652) <charles+slashdot@dyfis.net> on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @08:54AM (#29896531)

        Not everyone does long-distance highway travel more than once or twice a year -- I don't, anyhow, and when I do, I rent a car rather than putting the miles on mine anyhow.

        Range may legitimately keep electric cars out of some markets, but certainly not all of them.

        • by Wonko the Sane (25252) * on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @08:59AM (#29896605) Journal

          I rent a car rather than putting the miles on mine anyhow.

          That makes a lot more sense than trying to make an electric car into something that it can't be.

          Until we get that 20 times improvement in battery technology it makes more sense to optimise electric vehicles for commuting, not long distance.

          • by hitmark (640295) on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @09:18AM (#29896899) Journal

            one option would be to put induction cables into the road, so that the car can be charged while driving.

            hell, add a data channel so that the car knows what road its on, and what direction, and it could practically drive itself with the right navigation system installed.

            • by vlm (69642) on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @09:26AM (#29897021)

              one option would be to put induction cables into the road, so that the car can be charged while driving.

              I think you'd find the effect on steel car chassis to be very "exciting" (sorry for electric motor field winding pun this early in the morning). That would apply to any "mostly iron" chassis, no matter if IC or electric powered, or even semi and RV trailers...

              Seriously though, although turning the road into a giant linear induction motor sounds very amusing under normal circumstances, it would be a bit wasteful in stop and go conditions and very dangerous in low traction situations.

            • by Eccles (932)

              one option would be to put induction cables into the road, so that the car can be charged while driving.

              Taxi stands could have built-in charging cables for electric taxis.

              • by Rogerborg (306625)

                Taxi stands could have built-in charging cables for electric taxis.

                Replace taxi with bus [technologyreview.com] and we're already living in the Future.

            • by evanbd (210358)

              The prospect of retrofitting inductive chargers into every major highway makes the idea of a high-power fast-charge "gas" station look easy in comparison. High capacity batteries already tolerate a fairly rapid charge rate with the correct smarts in the charger (required anyway, really). Today, you only have to sacrifice a little bit of cost / capacity / weight to get 5-minute charge capability. There are improvements coming (LiFePO4, for instance) that should improve on that. Even the 1MW (Tesla Roadst

            • by daid303 (843777) on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @09:51AM (#29897389)

              How about putting the cars on tracks, and run the electricity trough that. Also make the cars larger, and let multiple people ride the same one.

            • Re: (Score:2, Redundant)

              by sorak (246725)

              Did you just invent the train?

        • by Lumpy (12016)

          I wouldn't. local driving is far harder on a car than a long distance drive.

          I'd buy a car with 200,000miles of nothing but highway miles before a 45,000mile car that was all city driving.

          The engine and car in general will be in far better shape on the highway miles car.

      • by pnewhook (788591) on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @09:58AM (#29897501)

        I don't know about you but when I travel long distances on the highway I expect a 500 km trip to take about 4.5 hours, not 9 hours.

        Where did speed come into this? The Tesla has a max speed of 200km/h - more than enough for any sane road trip.

        • Where did speed come into this? The Tesla has a max speed of 200km/h - more than enough for any sane road trip.

          Enough for any short road trip. In order to achieve the range of a typical gasoline powered car the Roadster has to travel at half the speed.

          It's perfect for driving around town but in no way is it good for long-distance transportation.

    • by Nadaka (224565)

      The Tesla isn't exactly expensive for its class. Compare it to a high end BMW and you will see that it slightly outperforms the BMW at its price class in several areas (though range isn't one of those areas).

      • by Nadaka (224565)

        Oops, forget my comment. I thought they were talking about the luxury sedan, not the sports car. Brain hurt.

      • by Lumpy (12016)

        Or buy a lotus elise and have the same car with more performance and can be refueled at any gas station for 1/2 the money.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Chris Burke (6130)

          Or buy a lotus elise and have the same car with more performance

          Except not. The Roadster beats the Elise 0-60 by over a second. Hell it beats sports cars that are twice the cost. It's top speed is lower, but it has a limiter.

          and can be refueled at any gas station

          Definitely a big disadvantage for the Roadster, in those situations where it matters. As in not a lot of people are driving their sports cars cross country. If you do, the Roadster won't work. If that's not a problem, then the Roadster has the

      • THIS! Plus, you get a nice tax credit =)
  • by Joce640k (829181) on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @08:48AM (#29896433) Homepage

    The tesla has hundreds of laptop batteries in it, each with the energy of a hand grenade. What if something goes wrong...?

  • The metric system is the tool of the devil! My EV gets 40 rods to the... damn, I don't know enough about how energy is measured to finish the joke.

  • ... because the lightweight frame will fold like a piece of tissue.

    Which is why I won't buy one of these things until the frame is a carbon fiber composite stronger than steel or titanium. Expensive. In the meantime, I plan to continue to drive a gas guzzling heavy framed car that keeps me safe from the dimwitted morons on the road.

    Yours truly, Mr. Cold-Water-Of-Reality-Man

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by geekoid (135745)

      A) how many accidents have you been in?
      B) There are several perfectly safe non gas guzzlers.

      Really, you are just afraid of change for some reason..possible due to your small penis.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by ianare (1132971)

      ... because the lightweight frame will fold like a piece of tissue.

      You WANT the frame to fold. Ever hear of crumple zones?

      Which is why I won't buy one of these things until the frame is a carbon fiber composite stronger than steel or titanium. Expensive.

      The advantage of CF is weight, it is not much stronger than steel (if at all, depending on application). So while more and more components of mainstream vehicles will be made using CF, the main reason is for better fuel economy (less weight = less fuel needed).

      In the meantime, I plan to continue to drive a gas guzzling heavy framed car that keeps me safe from the dimwitted morons on the road.

      Your heavy and inefficient vehicle is not only a danger to others, but to yourself as well. You equate a heavy and inflexible frame with improved safety, but this is not reality, and (if you have

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @10:34AM (#29898049)

    Does a car have to be nuclear to get people excited around here? I'm not even hearing any new arguments. Until it can be instantly recharged and cost less than an average car few people are interested and most are outright hostile? If any one is interested check out "Who Killed The Electric Car". Every person that got their hands on one loved it and they did no more than 50 miles per charge, the Tesla can do around 240 with normal driving. The real joke is what they seemed to like most WAS the convenience. They loved the fact you didn't have to stop by a gas station just plug it in when you got home.

    "Gee they are only for the rich." Well I've got a shocker for you when calculators first came out they were large and cost around $400, more like a $1000 in adjusted dollars. Also all they did was basic math. Within ten years they were under $10 and you could soon after that find them built into pens. You won't find that radical a change with batteries but they will come down. I'm more concerned with the weight since that is hurting performance. The battery weight is all that is keeping a Tesla from blowing away a $200,000 sports car. Basically they have the potential to blow away a car twice the price and can already do it in the straightway. Just imagine the weight cut in half and the mileage doubled?

    "But once a year we drive to Grandma's house". Man am I tired of that argument. How many drivers drive more than 200 miles a day? Damn few. Here's a shocker, how many people that could aford an electric car are single car families? Near zero. Point being if the thought of not being able to take a long drive makes you hyperventilate then make one car gasoline or hybrid.

    Christ I've even seen blind people complain because of the LACK of noise. They do make sound just not as obnoxious as cars and trucks do. Picture this, once the prices start to match regular cars you can fill up for a $1 to $3. And it's a myth that we'll each have to have our own nuclear plant. The average house could charge one daily just by switching their existing bulbs to compact florescents. Once LEDs get as cheap the savings would be enough to charge two cars. We won't have to build a single coal plant and if you just took the gas savings and put solar panels on the roof then there would be no increase you'd actually drive for free once the panels were paid off.

    Last century saw the end of horse drawn carriages let's make this the century we get rid of gas guzzlers. They are starting to look as primitive as carriages.

  • Tesla race blog (Score:3, Informative)

    by Falconhell (1289630) on Wednesday October 28, 2009 @04:39PM (#29902997) Journal

    For those who are interested, the blog for this internode entry, detailing the event so far is at;

    http://blog.internode.on.net/ [on.net]

    Simon and Emilis are experienced glider pilots too, and credit the experience they have from glider energy management as one of the factors in acheiving the record.

    MOst amazing thing is the article spelt Emilis surname correctly!

We warn the reader in advance that the proof presented here depends on a clever but highly unmotivated trick. -- Howard Anton, "Elementary Linear Algebra"

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