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Operating Systems Google Technology

ChromeOS Zero Released 232

Posted by timothy
from the for-your-testing-curiosity dept.
charliesome writes "Hexxeh, a student from the United Kingdom, has been the source for ChromeOS builds since the release of the Google operating system. He's just released ChromeOS Zero, a small build designed for speed and aesthetics. He recently did an interview with The Chrome Source."
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ChromeOS Zero Released

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  • by catmandue (1132331) on Sunday January 17, 2010 @08:27PM (#30802886)
    Wake up MS. There another new kid on the block as rich as you.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 17, 2010 @08:34PM (#30802926)

    I don't get who this guy is. He was the source for ChromeOS builds?!? Google dropped it?! How does this guy handle Google's builds?

    I don't get it.

    ChromeOS Zero - what's so special about it?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 17, 2010 @08:44PM (#30802986)

      So he's basically doing the job of a Linux distributor. He builds the ChromeOS packages from source, then you can download his binaries and install them. This is probably easier and quicker than building them yourself.

      That's all there is to it.. if ChromeOS Zero was Slackware, this guy would be Patrick Volkerding.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 17, 2010 @08:51PM (#30803036)

      ChromeOS Zero - is the first OS API with no functions.*

      *Not a low-calorie OS.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by PopeRatzo (965947) *

        the first OS API with no functions

        Considering what some other bloated major operating systems have become, that might not be such a bad thing.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          Yeah, well, firefox (actually, phoenix or firebird or somethings) was mozilla with all the crap stripped out of it. Now it's evolved back to square one. ChromeOS is just the same principle on the OS level. Wait 5 years and it'll be bloated like the rest of them

          • I thought Chrome OS was meant to be a browser with a bootloader. Exactly how does one bloat that?
            • by hvm2hvm (1208954)
              If it gets to be used by enough people, in time some will want feature X,Y or Z and they will have to patch up new functionality to the OS. For example, wanting 3D acceleration is enough to bloat it up real good.
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by LostCluster (625375) *
        No functions, but they use value-returning-subroutine syrup in its place.
    • by MichaelSmith (789609) on Sunday January 17, 2010 @08:52PM (#30803060) Homepage Journal

      TFA says it is ChromiumOS. Chromium is the is the open source version of Chrome.

      • by rchh (658159) on Sunday January 17, 2010 @10:24PM (#30803672) Homepage
        Chromium OS is the development version [chromium.org] of Chrome OS which, when released during 2nd half of 2010, is also going to be completely open source. [wikipedia.org]
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          Chromium OS is the development version [chromium.org] of Chrome OS which, when released during 2nd half of 2010, is also going to be completely open source. [wikipedia.org]

          That's great and all but I'm afraid I'm going to have to say having entered the real world and been working a real job, I was deluding myself into thinking OSS was the way to go.

          There needs to be a deadline, set features, and programmers getting paid full to time to write code that they don't want to write, for important things to get done in the OS. I hope Google will provide this?
          Example would be that mouse-over-button bug that was in bugzilla for 6 years before somebody got the nerve to go unpack the pro

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by Fred_A (10934)

            Example would be that mouse-over-button bug that was in bugzilla for 6 years before somebody got the nerve to go unpack the problem and rework the bits of the code that needed to be reworked so that a window with a button in it that was drawn under where the mouse currently was would actually automatically hilight the button and let you click it. Before this guy got the balls go and fix it, it sat there. And bugged the hell out of me for 3 years while I deluded myself into thinking the OSS development model was superior.

            Superior to the commercial model where similarly irritating bugs routinely get ignored for years because overworked teams are busy working on $NextLayerOfCruftyFeatures as demanded by marketing instead of fixing their damn product ?
            In that case you're right, it's not always superior. It mostly depends on the team managing the project (in both worlds, be it OSS or commercial).

          • by ampathee (682788)

            There needs to be a deadline, set features, and programmers getting paid full to time to write code that they don't want to write, for important things to get done in the OS. I hope Google will provide this?

            Google will provide this.

            My understanding is that Chrome OS will be the "official" build of google's Chromium OS open-source project.

            Just like Chrome the browser is the "official" build of google's Chromium open-source project.

          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by g253 (855070)
            I see no reason why you can't have your "traditional" development model (deadlines, programmers paid to do stuff they don't like, all those niceties) and still release the code as OSS. How about Ubuntu? Don't they have all of the above?

            The fact that anyone can access and modify the code doesn't mean it must only be provided by volunteers.
    • by LostCluster (625375) * on Sunday January 17, 2010 @10:00PM (#30803508)
      He compiled the code that Google only officially releases as source code to the public at this time, and this his third release, after fixing several problems he discovered. He's one of the few people working on this OS that Google doesn't employ.
    • by H3XX3H (1038132) on Sunday January 17, 2010 @10:28PM (#30803700)

      I don't get who this guy is. He was the source for ChromeOS builds?!? Google dropped it?! How does this guy handle Google's builds?

      I don't get it.

      ChromeOS Zero - what's so special about it?

      These builds take the ChromiumOS source provided by Google, and just improve upon it and deviate slightly from the direction Google is going in. Google is tailoring to a very limited set of devices, but really, there are a lot of people on a very wide range of hardware who would like to use ChromiumOS, and so I'm trying to make it more accessible/usable. I'm also providing updates automatically with the launch of the updater beta, to remove the need for frequent reimages to stay up to date.

  • ChromeOS ? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Funnnny (1409625) on Sunday January 17, 2010 @08:55PM (#30803078)
    This is ChromiumOS, and the open source he has is Chromium OS too. There's a differrent between Chromium and Chrome, like the browser. Corect me.
  • by joh (27088)

    This guy should distribute this as a VirtualBox machine or so. Do I really want to *boot* into something that is just a browser without an OS and without apps? Gimme something to use and to play with on the side and I may have fun with it. Pulling my teeth would be more fun than booting into Chrome on a real machine, sorry.

    • by Nethead (1563)

      Ya know, Joh, if I laid down a pair of pliers and a Chrome CD, I have a feeling which one you would really pick.

      • After having used ChromeOS on a flashdrive for about 30 minutes, I would take the pliers and squeeze the hell out of the disk. After my desire for destruction had been filled, I would go back inside and take the rest of my meds, so that I may rid myself of whatever other rage I have left.
    • by node 3 (115640)

      This guy should distribute this as a VirtualBox machine or so.

      Why? Isn't Chrome available for your OS? ChromiumOS in a vm seems like a lot of work to just run Chrome/Chromium.

      Do I really want to *boot* into something that is just a browser without an OS and without apps?

      Apparently not. Fortunately, no one is demanding you do so.

      Gimme something to use and to play with on the side and I may have fun with it.

      Just run Chrome. If you find playing around with alternative OSs (including something as limited as ChromiumOS), I'm sure you won't have trouble installing it in virtualbox yourself.

      Pulling my teeth would be more fun than booting into Chrome on a real machine, sorry.

      No need to be sorry. Chromium isn't meant for "real machines" (whatever that really means anyway). It's directed at netbooks. I'm unaware of anyone suggesting

      • This guy should distribute this as a VirtualBox machine or so.

        Why? Isn't Chrome available for your OS? ChromiumOS in a vm seems like a lot of work to just run Chrome/Chromium.

        =

        You are right, of course. By the time I have downloaded an ISO, and told VirtualBox to create a new machine which will boot from that ISO, I am exhausted. I've spent AT LEAST 10 minutes inside of GUI's setting up the download, then creating the VM. At this point, I'm ready to take the rest of the week off.

        Tell us, Node3 - how much

  • by absurdist (758409) on Sunday January 17, 2010 @09:52PM (#30803466)
    ...because as it is now it's slower than Windows 7 on my eee701.
  • by MadMaverick9 (1470565) on Sunday January 17, 2010 @10:34PM (#30803750)

    If my ADSL connection is down for thirty minutes, I can't do anything with the piece of hardware and software sitting on my desk. Since all the apps are on ... the Internet.

    So ... WHY would anybody use this???

    Anybody remember GMail's outtages ... ???

    Looks like vendor lock-in to me ... all depends on Google. If Google ever goes bye-bye, all your data goes bye-bye too.

    Can anybody explain to me , please ... Why???

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by dcawrey (1721370)
      Google is making moves to allow offline use of its apps.. you can now set Gmail to sync for offline use.
    • Really, what is worth doing on a PC now that -doesn't- require a network connection. If I lose my ISP connection for a day I tend to stare at my machine in futility. Let's see how I use it on a daily basis: Check Slashdot Check BBC News Check my mail (gmail) Play Age of Conan Hop on vent and chat Download something to watch or cruise Youtube Check out movie previews at Apple.com Update my software / drivers (more weekly than daily) All of those are network enabled, most are provided by a browser. I would
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by nine-times (778537)

      Because Google has been working on Google Gears and HTML offline functionality? If that stuff is working, you should be able to run Gmail, Google Docs, and other applications without a connection.

    • by Blakey Rat (99501)

      If you don't like it, just don't buy it...

      That's not an ellipsis, I just wanted to follow the parent's example with punctuation...

    • by PCM2 (4486)

      I remember GMail outages. But if your ADSL is down, what is your local email client going to do for you that GMail wouldn't?

    • by DrDitto (962751)
      I find my computer worthless when disconnected from the internet. Any code I write is done on remote systems. I grew out of gaming long ago. Perhaps I would edit/organize photos, but thats about it.

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