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HDMI Labeling Requirements Promise a Stew of Confusion 396

Posted by timothy
from the thick-viscous-stew dept.
An anonymous reader writes "In many ways HDMI has revolutionized the way we connect devices. By unifying video and audio into a single cable manufacturers have been able to make their products easier to set up than ever before. Until recently there hasn't actually been much difference in HDMI cables. But things are about to get confusing with the introduction of HDMI 1.4. By the 1st of January 2012 manufacturers of products with HDMI ports won't actually be able to call HDMI 1.4 by its real name. In fact, come November 18 this year those selling cables won't be able to use HDMI 1.4 or HDMI 1.3 to delineate between different products. Instead cables that support version 1.4 of the HDMI standard will have to use one of five different labels. The new labels? Well, as this story explains, they're going to cause a new level of confusion for anyone hooking up a home cinema. Add to this the fact that the HDMI organisation keeps the details of its specifications secret, and translation between version numbering and marketing-speak will be well nigh impossible."
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HDMI Labeling Requirements Promise a Stew of Confusion

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  • by boneclinkz (1284458) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:16PM (#33073080)
    Will my $600 gold-plated monster superconductor cable support the new standards?
    • Yes (Score:5, Funny)

      by The MAZZTer (911996) <megazzt@[ ]il.com ['gma' in gap]> on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:18PM (#33073110) Homepage
      and so will your coathanger.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        and so will your coathanger.

        and so will your coathanger.

        You were probably joking, but since someone was clueless enough to mod you insightful instead of funny, let me make a quick little note here. HDMI cables transfer high frequency data, so impedance must be taken into account. Digital signals traveling a meter or two at ~200MHz are quite "versatile" and can handle being transferred over cheap wires, but if the impedance is grossly wrong, your signal will not make it to the other side in any decipherable form. Parallel non-insulated steel (lossy) wires probabl

        • Re:Yes (Score:5, Insightful)

          by schon (31600) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @03:59PM (#33074986)

          Actually, I believe he was referring to this [consumerist.com], in which audiophiles couldn't tell the difference between monster cables and a coathanger.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:27PM (#33073290)

      Why take the chance. Just buy the new $800 version and you'll be good to go!

      8-)

      • by commodore64_love (1445365) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @03:19PM (#33074226) Journal

        >>>>>Will my $600 gold-plated monster superconductor cable support the new standards?
        >>
        >>Why take the chance. Just buy the new $800 version and you'll be good to go!

        And...

        I'm done. The HDTV and Bluray player is going on Ebay. I can't keep up (or afford) all these constantly changing standards. I'll get my entertainment an easier and cheaper way (dusts off the books & old black-and-white tv). Maybe it's time to learn some open source programming too. I work cheap (minimum wage).

        • by mr_lizard13 (882373) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @03:47PM (#33074768)
          Why? Will your tv and blu-ray player stop working when this new cable comes out?
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by halltk1983 (855209)
            Once the Blu-Ray player auto-updates itself to support the New Super-Happy-Fun-Time DRM 1.4(R), now with extra sticky bits(TM)! it might just...
          • by commodore64_love (1445365) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @05:56PM (#33076728) Journal

            >>>Why? Will your tv and blu-ray player stop working when this new cable comes out?

            Honestly I don't own either an HDTV or Bluray. I was being smartassed.

            BUT I am starting to wonder if I want to waste my time upgrading to HD, if the Megacorps keep insisting upon changing the standards every year or two. And I'm not just talking about these cables, but also the recent FCC plnn to convert TV from MPEG2 to MPEG4 (which means I have to toss my less-than-a-year-old receiver in the trash), and companies like Comcast forcing people in my area to rent "converter boxes" at $5 per set. I'm perfectly happy to just stick with DVDa, plus books, plus whatever I can grab off the net.

            I come from the old school where I had the same computer for ten years (Amiga and WinXP, each) and have no desire to hop on a yearly upgrade treadmill just because of planned obsolescence.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by clang_jangle (975789)
      No, but using your computer with a FOSS OS to watch video and a decent p2p setup will render them irrelevant. It's called "opting out of being ripped off". Until Big Media shows a little respect, that's what they deserve because they set it up so that either they steal from you, you steal from them, or you do without. Fuck them.
      • by VGPowerlord (621254) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @03:12PM (#33074118)

        No, but using your computer with a FOSS OS to watch video and a decent p2p setup will render them irrelevant. It's called "opting out of being ripped off". Until Big Media shows a little respect, that's what they deserve because they set it up so that either they steal from you, you steal from them, or you do without. Fuck them.

        You mean the computer I have that has a $5 HDMI cable running between my computer and monitor?

        Wait, how is HDMI irrelevant again?

    • by noidentity (188756) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:56PM (#33073858)
      My friend, $600 will buy you a lot, but a cable that works with the newest HDMI standards it will not. May I interest you in our $1200 version? It's twice the pri.. quality. And in case you want higher quality YouTube videos, we've got the amazing Denon AK-DL1 [denon.com] Ethernet cable. It will sharpen your web-browsing experience, and make it run faster.
    • by blair1q (305137) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @03:15PM (#33074168) Journal

      No. Using cables labeled "HDMI 1.3" instead of "Standard Speed" will result in rounded harmonics on the peak voicing pressures of cross-coupled sound space reproductions.

      The new cables are made with labelling technology that accesses the uppermost reaches of gullibility distortion, ensuring that your credulous experience is the highest quality known to science.

      The waiting list is open, and financing is available.

  • by Polo (30659) * on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:17PM (#33073092) Homepage

    Why not just name them HDMI 1 and HDMI 2?
    (or HDMI 3, etc)

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by maxwell demon (590494)

      Because people could actually understand it, and then buy just what they need.

      • by somersault (912633) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:46PM (#33073652) Homepage Journal

        You joke, but check this from TFA:

        The specifics are outlined in a 38 page document on the HDMI website. At the most basic level cables are split into 'Standard' and 'High Speed' versions. Standard cables are tested to support video up to 720p/1080i. High Speed cables on the other hand are tested to 1080p resolution. Within these categories come the inevitable subcategories. Standard is split three ways into Standard HDMI Cable, Standard HDMI Cable with Ethernet and Standard Automotive HDMI cable. High Speed Cables come in two versions - High Speed HDMI Cable and High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet.

        Oh noes, how are we possibly going to be able to tell which cable to buy? :0

        With the exception of "Standard Automotive HDMI cable" they all seem rather good, self explanatory names to me. Much better names than just "HDMI 1.4 cable" anyway. Besides, the packaging probably will still say HDMI 1.4 somewhere..?

        • With the exception of "Standard Automotive HDMI cable" they all seem rather good, self explanatory names to me. Much better names than just "HDMI 1.4 cable" anyway. Besides, the packaging probably will still say HDMI 1.4 somewhere..?

          I agree that the names are relatively self-explanatory... Even the automotive one seems pretty clear to me - if it isn't going in a car you probably don't want that cable.

          But it seems like there's some redundancy and un-necessary detail. If "high speed" cables are tested up to 1080p resolution, they ought to work for lower resolutions as well, right? So why not just make that the new standard? If you make an HDMI cable, test it to that standard, and you know it'll work with pretty much anything.

          The conf

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by SETIGuy (33768)

            If "high speed" cables are tested up to 1080p resolution, they ought to work for lower resolutions as well, right? So why not just make that the new standard?

            Five dollar unlabeled cables you find at the flea market work fine with 1080p, so you know it's not a very tough spec to hit. Has anyone ever seen an HDMI cable that couldn't?

            It's about what it's always been about: selling essentially identical products under tiered pricing. "You want to do 1080p? You'll need the $75 cable. See, on the purple package it says 1080p. On the blue package it says 1080i. So you'll need the purple package unless you also need digital audio. That's the $100 cable."

        • by mooingyak (720677) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @04:06PM (#33075106)

          Besides, the packaging probably will still say HDMI 1.4 somewhere..?

          From the article:

          In fact, come November 18 this year those selling cables won't be able to use HDMI 1.4 or HDMI 1.3 to delineate between different products.

          Which sounds to me like the HDMI license terms won't allow it to appear on the packaging.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by cptdondo (59460)

          Oh noes, how are we possibly going to be able to tell which cable to buy? :0

          With the exception of "Standard Automotive HDMI cable" they all seem rather good, self explanatory names to me. Much better names than just "HDMI 1.4 cable" anyway. Besides, the packaging probably will still say HDMI 1.4 somewhere..?

          Well, what happens at 1.5?

          We get "Full Speed" which is going to be higher than "High Speed". Can anyone really remember which USB speed is "Full" and "High"?

          It's all designed to sow confusion in the market, from which companies will profit.

          "Oh, you have a standard cable. You really need a high speed cable."

          $50 later,

          "Did you say you have a high speed cable? Did you get the one with the integrated audio?"

          $50 later,

          "Did you say you have a high speed cable with integrated audio? You really need the standar

    • HDMI.001
      HDMI.002 ...
      HDMI.999

      There, you're good for 999 versions and the names easily sort.

      Back to the topic, just buy whatever cable, cut the bag open and if it doesn't work ... RETURN IT TO THE STORE FOR A REFUND.

      The store will try to re-sell it ... but which of the regular customers are going to buy a cable when it is obviously rejected by someone else.

      So, eventually, the store will try to return them to the manufacture for a refund.

      That's when the manufacturers can put pressure to get the label restricti

      • by Dogers (446369)

        Back to the topic, just buy whatever cable, cut the bag open and if it doesn't work ... RETURN IT TO THE STORE FOR A REFUND.

        Which they probably won't accept as it's not in re-saleable condition! :o

      • by lennier1 (264730)

        999 model numbers aren't a bad start.

        But don't forget to take a page out of the book of CPU manufacturers where a higher model number doesn't necessarily have to mean that it's better. Wouldn't want customers to make sense of what model they have to buy unless they've memorized the list of current versions and their background.

      • Depends what you mean by "work" -- for example, I want my HDMI cables to support 1080p, even if I only use it for a 1080i signal right now. I don't want to have to take it back years later, when I try to plug it into a different source.

    • by AndrewNeo (979708)

      Probably because the connectors haven't changed, only the functionality (and the internals of the cables)

  • Why are all the old jokes about IBM marketing flooding into my mind?
    • by gstoddart (321705)

      Why are all the old jokes about IBM marketing flooding into my mind?

      Well, I don't know about IBM, but this reminds me why I've been treating all forms of HD as "in a constant state of change" since about 1999.

      The fact of the matter is, it seems like every two years something comes along which becomes incompatible with all previous incarnations of HD.

      Hell, as far as I recall, HDMI was the one that locked down everything with DRM and would no longer work with older devices.

      The technologies are changing so fas

      • Re:Wow... (Score:5, Informative)

        by SanityInAnarchy (655584) <ninja@slaphack.com> on Thursday July 29, 2010 @03:18PM (#33074204) Journal

        Hell, as far as I recall, HDMI was the one that locked down everything with DRM and would no longer work with older devices.

        Please, please stop spreading this bullshit, and start correcting people when they repeat it.

        How hard is it to tell the difference between HDMI and HDCP?

        HDMI -- DVI plus audio, maybe plus ethernet, in a neater form factor.
        HDCP -- encrypted video signal, which works over DVI just as well as over HDMI.

        If you're currently using DVI instead of HDMI because you're afraid of the DRM, you're a moron. Again: It's just DVI which is easier to plug in. It doesn't do DRM unless your video card, OS, and monitor all agree to do so.

        I'm sorry if I'm overreacting, but EVERY FUCKING SLASHDOT ARTICLE that mentions HDMI, there's at least two people who confuse it with HDCP. That's like refusing to buy a DVD burner for backup because you're afraid of DRM on DVDs.

  • Remember kids (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Pojut (1027544) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:18PM (#33073118) Homepage

    Unless you are doing a permanent wall installation, if you spend more than $10-$15 on an HDMI cable, you got Effed in the A!

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      monoprice.com, the saver of dollars.

    • by boneclinkz (1284458) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:26PM (#33073266)
      I once feigned ignorance (not much of a feat for me, in most things) and asked a Best Buy employee what was better about the $100 HDMI cables. He said two things that I thought were amazing*.

      1) My Playstation3 was not going to look as good on the $20 cable, because all the colors could not go through the cheaper cable fast enough.

      2) The more expensive cable uses a better conductor metal for "better frequency".

      *I don't really fault an employee that's making $8 an hour with no commission for talking out his ass, I just thought this was funny.
      • by AndrewNeo (979708)

        I would have asked him how a passive cable knows which bits in the stream are the colors.

      • Re:Remember kids (Score:4, Insightful)

        by gstoddart (321705) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:47PM (#33073664) Homepage

        I don't really fault an employee that's making $8 an hour with no commission for talking out his ass, I just thought this was funny.

        I don't fault him, but as soon as one of them lies to me out of either ignorance or greed, that is when I tell them to leave me alone.

        If you know it's a lie, get away from me. If you don't know it's a lie, you're not qualified to help me shop for it.

        If you insist I buy the cables that give you the extra commission, I'll cancel the whole damned sale.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by saider (177166)

          Don't forget the all important "playing games" category where retailers try to come up with the most outlandish explanations for the premium widgets and compare stories in the breakroom. I understand it stems from the unending boredom of the job.

          I'm surprised more of these are not on YouTube.

          • by alanebro (1808492) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @03:46PM (#33074754)
            I worked at Best Buy in highschool. We had an ongoing competition of: -Whenever someone was interested in a ps2, try to get them to buy an XBox. -Whenever someone was interested in an XBox, try to get them to buy a ps2. Good times.
          • Re:Remember kids (Score:5, Insightful)

            by tophermeyer (1573841) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @04:55PM (#33075902)

            Don't forget the all important "playing games" category where retailers try to come up with the most outlandish explanations for the premium widgets and compare stories in the breakroom. I understand it stems from the unending boredom of the job.

            Ha! I used to work part time at the electronics section of a big box retailer during college. Obviously we weren't individually commissioned, but our store manager would reward us with food and free crap if the department posted good sales numbers. We used to really enjoy pulling off outlandish justifications for fun and profit. We would even refer distrusting customers to our "cabling specialist" for more information. At the time, we felt like we needed to have fun with it to stay sane.

            Now grown up me wants the chance to meet up with the smart-ass 19 year old me and punch me right in the face for trying to sell me junk.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by blair1q (305137)

        I don't expect that many of them are talking out their ass. I expect that many of them are regurgitating the meta-rectal disgorgements of others.

        And I don't let them continue behaving that way. I should probably bill Best Buy for training their lamers. Fry's droids I don't even ask questions; they know more about carpet samples than computers.

  • by girlintraining (1395911) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:19PM (#33073128)

    Confuse customers so the only guidance they have is the price. "Well, it's more expensive so it has to be better!" Once you get consumers thinking that, they're easy pickings. Oops. I should have sugar-coated that with some intellectual discourse to obscure that simple truth... Oh well.

    • Only if they get to the shop in the first place. Otherwise apathy will ensure this generation of connectors gets skipped.

    • by somersault (912633) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:54PM (#33073808) Homepage Journal

      Once again a Slashdot summary designed to rage or amuse, yet the names are... wait for it....

      Standard HDMI Cable
      Standard HDMI Cable with Ethernet
      Standard Automotive HDMI cable
      High Speed HDMI Cable
      High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet

      Standard cables are tested to support video up to 720p/1080i.

      High Speed are tested to 1080p resolution.

      How can anyone complain about that? It isn't any more complicated than Standard vs HD, though admittedly some people won't know what ethernet means. I don't know what the difference with the automotive cable is either, but I assume that the High Speed with Ethernet would work for all needs.

  • How hard was it (Score:3, Informative)

    by future assassin (639396) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:19PM (#33073138) Homepage

    > By unifying video and audio into a single cable manufacturers have been able to make their products easier to set up than ever before.

    Seriously how hard was it to hook up the $2 three color coded RCA jacks?

    • Re:How hard was it (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Pojut (1027544) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:21PM (#33073174) Homepage

      That depends. If you're asking the "average" consumer, the answer would be "very!"

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      The purpose of capitalism is to make you think you wanted something you never wanted, then to sell it to you.

    • by Culture20 (968837)

      Seriously how hard was it to hook up the $2 three color coded RCA jacks?

      My dog never got it quite right.

    • When talking about just 1, maybe 2 things connecting to your tv or receiver composite video plus audio wasn't a big deal, once you had several it gets messy. With component video it gets even messier. Granted, they weren't difficult to work with, just ugly and messy.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by fyngyrz (762201)
        • They're behind the gear
        • You only fool with them at install time
        • It's *really* not a problem
        • HDCP, on the other hand, is REALLY a problem
    • Re:How hard was it (Score:4, Insightful)

      by EvanED (569694) <evaned@ g m a i l.com> on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:32PM (#33073374)

      Depends. Do you have a nice setup, or are you reaching your arm in back of your A/V equipment trying to do things by feel? Avoiding the need to pull out the components to actually look at them (since you can't do color by feel, obviously), is a reasonably nice benefit.

      • by cynyr (703126)

        how easy is it to feel the direction of a HDMI connection? now try it with sata....

    • by Abstrackt (609015)

      > By unifying video and audio into a single cable manufacturers have been able to make their products easier to set up than ever before.

      Seriously how hard was it to hook up the $2 three color coded RCA jacks?

      It's not hard to hook up three cables but wouldn't you agree it's easier to hook up a single cable instead?

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by kent_eh (543303)
      It's very difficult... to make a big profit from.
      And, really, that's the most important thing isn't it?
  • by RichMan (8097) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:20PM (#33073154)

    Welcome to marketing ploy 101.

    There are a myrad of confusing options. The only real solution is the really high end that does everything costs the most. Anything else is "it might work". It can also be sold with the "you are going to get the 4K TV someday arn't you?" approach.

    There is only one solution and it will cost the consumer. It was planed that way.
    Are we surprised ?

    • by Iron Condor (964856) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @05:22PM (#33076318)

      Every tool has three price points (hammers, cameras, AV equipment...)

      The lowest is for the layman. The layman doesn't know the differences between the various hammers, ti the layman all hammers look the same. So why spend $20 or $100 if you can buy one for $5?

      The highest is for the amateurs: the amateur understands that there are differences in quality and how they manifest and the amateur understands that the cheapest device doesn't exactly tend to be the best quality. That's why amateurs buy $100 hammers and $2000 cameras and $500 AV cables.

      The middle price point is for the professional. The pro understands that he doesn't want the cheap crappy hammer that'll ruin his carpals in a day of framing, but he also understands that the laser guide and designer handle on the $100 hammer are just crap to bilk the amateur DYIer. So he buys the $20 hammer that does the job, is well balanced and skips on the frills. Because he's a pro and confident in his ability to pick a *good* $20 hammer.

      • by dangitman (862676) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @09:40PM (#33078782)

        The middle price point is for the professional. The pro understands that he doesn't want the cheap crappy hammer that'll ruin his carpals in a day of framing, but he also understands that the laser guide and designer handle on the $100 hammer are just crap to bilk the amateur DYIer. So he buys the $20 hammer that does the job, is well balanced and skips on the frills. Because he's a pro and confident in his ability to pick a *good* $20 hammer.

        That's pretty much wrong for all your examples, except perhaps for hammers. The amateur photographer buys the mid-priced camera, $1,000 to $2,000. The professional buys the $2,000 to $20,000 camera. The amateur in AV systems might buy a 2,000 to 10,000 home theater system. The professional buys a $100,000 to $500,000 Digital Cinema system.

        It probably even applies to hammers. An amateur buys an expensive hammer, the professional buys an industrial-strength nail-gun system. (Disclaimer: I don't know that much about construction tools, so my example might be way off, but I know that professional builders use some pretty specialized equipment beyond the budget of non-professionals).

  • The audiophool industry will have the exact cables you need ..... for $1800 per 3 foot cable.
  • ... and ignore the rest.

    Negative word-of-mouth (and painful difficulties) will separate the wheat from the chaff. The solutions that work well will survive. So has it been, so shall it be. The invisible hand may not always work as we wish, but it can still slap down the business models that suck.

    • by jimicus (737525)

      ... and ignore the rest.

      Negative word-of-mouth (and painful difficulties) will separate the wheat from the chaff. The solutions that work well will survive. So has it been, so shall it be. The invisible hand may not always work as we wish, but it can still slap down the business models that suck.

      Really? So how come there's so many people on /. making a tidy living out of tidying up after software which should never have been conceived, let alone sold - and have been doing so for years?

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by John Hasler (414242)

      > The invisible hand may not always work as we wish, but it can still slap
      > down the business models that suck.

      Unfortunately it is often handcuffed by government (with patents, in this case).

  • by Petersko (564140) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:23PM (#33073228)
    ...just jizzed all over his monitor.
  • by elrous0 (869638) * on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:28PM (#33073302)
    I used to have an old cheap HDMI cable I bought off of newegg that I used for my old TV and it worked fine. When I upgraded to a new Samsung TV, it worked for picture, but not for audio. At first I thought the TV was defective. So I tried another cable of the same type (I had bought them both at the same time) and got the same results--picture was fine but no audio. But when I tried out a newer, more expensive cable it suddenly worked fine. So, while I don't advocate spending big $ on ridiculously overpriced Monster cables, there apparently is a difference between some HDMI cables, at least for some TV's (maybe Samsungs are especially finicky).
  • HDBaseT (Score:3, Informative)

    by ekimd (968058) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:28PM (#33073306)
    Looks like we'll just have to adopt the HDBaseT [wikipedia.org] spec instead.
    • by CastrTroy (595695)
      The problem, is that HDMI requires 10 Gb/s, which is only barely do-able on Cat6. But I like where this is going. Basically, all we should really need is a network cable with extra shielding, so that we can have the high transfer rates. That way, we can make our own cables, and we can also use a standard connector that in the future can accommodate even higher transfer rates.
  • It's almost as if they're deliberately trying to confuse customers, to get them to buy the wrong cable twice and then pay Geek Squad $130 an hour to explain to them which cable to use and how to set it up probably.

    But that would be crazy.
  • Why not just buy the cheapest one you can, see if it works, and move up only if necessary? Marketing fog will always try to wring more money out of you (in ANY consumer product area), but it only will if you let it. HDMI is no different; if the plug fits then it will almost always work, if not there is probably a special case, and a Google search will resolve your problem in less than 5 minutes.

  • by Andy Dodd (701) <atd7@@@cornell...edu> on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:42PM (#33073580) Homepage

    The five grades listed make sense. Standard Speed and High Speed with and without Ethernet (total of 4 combos of those two) and the Automotive cable.

    However the other stuff is poorly executed, like the "4K" rule. And do they have any rules on putting arbitrary meaningless bandwidth numbers on their cables like the example in the article and Monster? Any number that exceeds the bandwidth actually used by HDMI is meaningless, but manufacturers still stick crazy numbers on their cables anyway.

    Manufacturers should be permitted:
    To state which version of the HDMI spec they are compliant to, or very clearly defined capabilities (such as High Speed-No Ethernet)
    To give specific physical properties of their cable's construction such as wire gauge and connector plating materials

    They should NOT be permitted:
    To advertise any electrical performance numbers that exceed the requirements of the defined HDMI specification, as these numbers are irrelevant to all users.

  • by awtbfb (586638) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:43PM (#33073594)
    I can live with confusing names if they get around to supporting closed captioning data like they are supposed to. They misinterpreted the legal requirements for closed captioning as it being something which is handled by set-top boxes rather than TVs and elected to not transmit the data. HDMI's own FAQ makes this position clear [hdmi.org]. However, the law is quite clear that the TVs are required to render captions. Unfortunately, people use devices other than set-top boxes to push content to the TV. If you need captioning, you can't use HDMI with Blu-ray disc players or other devices.
  • In a few years presumably some even higher bandwidth specification will come along - no problem if they used version-numbers, but once you have labelled the first generation "standard" and the current generation "High Speed" what're you going to be left with to use next and not end up looking stupid?

    "new higher speed", "max speed", "ultimate speed", "super more ultimate than ultimate speed", "I Can't believe its not high speed... speed"?

    • by Nkwe (604125) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:49PM (#33073720)

      In a few years presumably some even higher bandwidth specification will come along - no problem if they used version-numbers, but once you have labelled the first generation "standard" and the current generation "High Speed" what're you going to be left with to use next and not end up looking stupid?

      "new higher speed", "max speed", "ultimate speed", "super more ultimate than ultimate speed", "I Can't believe its not high speed... speed"?

      Ludicrous Speed

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by cynyr (703126)

      hmm that sounds familiar... USB anyone?

  • by EMR (13768) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:51PM (#33073766)

    It's a good idea to learn from the mistakes of others who like adding confusing naming.

  • Revolutionized? (Score:3, Informative)

    by xav_jones (612754) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @02:55PM (#33073836)
    Only for Americans. Obviously HDMI is digital but SCART has been a European standard for around three decades, including three channel video. Welcome to 1980!
  • Calling the currently higher-speed standard "High speed" is going to turn out to have been a mistake when a higher-speed standard appears in the future.

    And, as the link referred to in TFA [pcauthority.com.au] points out, "high speed" and "standard speed" don't even come close to suggesting the true applicability space of the cables. Consumers would be far better off if the labelling was required to carry the standard name (HDMI 1.3 or HDMI 1.4 with whatever add-on) and a URI pointing to the standards documentation.

    Why do stand

  • by 21mhz (443080) on Thursday July 29, 2010 @05:02PM (#33076046) Journal

    Bulshytt [wikia.com]

Make headway at work. Continue to let things deteriorate at home.

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