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North Korea Opens .kp Sites On the Internet 175

Posted by timothy
from the best-place-for-them-really dept.
eldavojohn writes "What an auspicious day for the Democratic People's Republic of Korea! To commemorate the 65th anniversary of the founding of the ruling Workers' Party of Korea, North Korea will no longer depend on Chinese national internet service to reach the outside world — they have their own connection and are hosting sites like the state run media. The article mentions that about a thousand websites are coming online, including services like Skype and Twitter. From where I sit in the United States, I can't seem to get any .kp TLD sites to resolve, but the news is promising if in fact it will bring more information to the information-starved masses of North Korea."
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North Korea Opens .kp Sites On the Internet

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  • Yay! (Score:5, Funny)

    by WrongSizeGlass (838941) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:27PM (#33846844)
    I'm going to beat the land rush to register "NorthKoreaIsTheBestKorea.kp" before Kim Jong-Il gets there first!
    • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

      by instagib (879544)

      In North Korea, Internet registers YOU!

    • Re:Yay! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) <obsessivemathsfreak AT eircom DOT net> on Saturday October 09, 2010 @05:48PM (#33847712) Homepage Journal

      The Democratic People's Republic of Korea isn't the best Korea; it's the only Korea, you Capitalist Roadster.

      Completely Embrace the Forward Thinking Progress of the People's Informational Movement!! Let The Empowered Voices Of The People Be Audible Across The Web!!* Down With The Internet Imperialists!

      *Offer void where in opposition to the rule of the Kim family and the Korean People's Army.

      • The Leader is gratified that your prove his point that oppressed masses throughout the world laud the technological strides that makes the DPRK the leader in advancement and computer science (III) throughout the world. He offers you a place at his side in the coming revolution. [you are likely to be eaten by a grue]
  • by GrumblyStuff (870046) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:28PM (#33846852)

    I doubt they even have TVs or radios. I bet it's not even legal for them to either.

    • I recall reading somewhere that radios imported from China could be bought in North Korea, but you were legally obliged to have the radio modified so that it could receive only the government broadcasts. A similar law existed in much of the former Communist Bloc.
      • by Hooya (518216)

        I read somewhere that their radio was permanently tuned to the govt channel. and you couldn't turn it off. very 1984. i don't know if the author of that article was hyperbolizing the reality in north korea or if 'dear leader' had taken 1984 for a "totalitarian regime for dummies".

        • by CohibaVancouver (864662) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @04:21PM (#33847194)

          I read somewhere that their radio was permanently tuned to the govt channel. and you couldn't turn it off.

          Sorta correct. The radios are pre-tuned to the government station, and then sealed. If you're caught with a radio with its seals broken (i.e. someone opened it up) then you're arrested. This is to prevent people from trying to receive signals from South Korea and/or China. You can, however, turn the radios off.

          • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

            by ConaxConax (1886430)
            Not according this to BBC documentary:
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSrcLC6Zz54 [youtube.com]
            (Skip to ~1:40 to see them talking about a state radio in every kitchen that can't be turned off)
          • ...If you're caught with a radio with its seals broken (i.e. someone opened it up) then you're arrested...

            almost right.
            Technically, the penalty for listening to South Korean broadcasts is death, but a small bribe is usually enough to get off without punishment.

            • The real conundrum is deciding how much of a bribe to offer. To little, and it's a short trip behind the barn, or to the latrine, and you don't come back.
    • by bjoast (1310293) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:34PM (#33846894)
      They have TV, but tuning in to Chinese or South Korean broadcasts is illegal. Their television sets are even modified to avoid such actions.
      • by piemcfly (1232770)
        Radios are quite normal in North Korea. They are sealed to specific ranges and checked every, I think, 3 months, to prevent people from listening to foreign media.
        TV's are also prominent amongst the higher classes of the country. South Korean soap operas are apparently quite popular to watch illegally on imported DVD'
        • by Pharmboy (216950) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:55PM (#33847038) Journal

          South Korean soap operas are apparently quite popular to watch illegally on imported DVD'

          I would hate to go to jail just because I wanted to find out if Kim ever recovered from double amnesia to discover his wife was really his father's ex-lover...

          • by Achra (846023)

            I would hate to go to Yodok [wikipedia.org] just because I wanted to find out if Kim ever recovered from double amnesia to discover his wife was really his father's ex-lover...

            Fixed that for you.

          • The running theme in Korean dramas actually seem to be saint-like wives having to deal with a total monster of a mother-in-law (since traditionally the wife moves in with the husbands family). Problem persists because father-in-law is a total wuss who won't tell his wife to stop being a bitch, the new wife doesn't want to demand respect for whatever reason, and the husband can't do much against his own mother to be effective.

        • by camperslo (704715) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @06:23PM (#33847922)

          Perhaps someone can provide some citations to info on what frequencies they're using?
          A.M. and shortwave radio technology is not high tech. It wouldn't take much knowledge of electronics to make receivers or frequency converters from parts out of old VCRs or whatever.
          Clever hacks are possible too. If they're using the low cost Chinese CFL replacements for incandescent lamps, maybe some could be modified to work at a switching frequency that would allow them to act as an conversion oscillator to shift a desired signal to a vacant supported frequency.

          Beyond radio inspections, their government might be able to tell what frequency a standard radio is tuned to by detecting radiation from the oscillator. The oscillator normally is offset by a standard amount from the frequency of the selected signal. (typically + 455 kHz for AM, + 10.7 MHz for FM)

          To illustrate the principle, one can tune a typical FM radio to a quiet spot on the top half of the band, and hear the oscillator (silence instead of static) when a second nearby radio is tuned 10.7 MHz lower in frequency. I once read of a college station that went around tracking down listeners and surprised a few knocking on doors and giving them a prize. That's a pretty good gag, but hard to do in areas where the band is very congested. When one is tuned to the upper half of the band, the oscillator may fall on VHF aircraft frequencies. That is why many had those bans on using radios when flying.

          • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

            by Anonymous Coward

            I have a friend who is a ham radio operator who took his equipment on a cruise. The cruise ship was being repositioned, so they went around much of the Pacific (my friend is retired). Off the coast of North Korea, he could hear their hams talking. As soon as he tried to contact someone, the air went silent followed shortly by an extremely high power broadcast extolling the virtues of Kim Jong Il. My friend was using a Japanese call sign.

            My point is that the equipment and expertise to do some of the things y

          • by dbIII (701233)
            Talking to your grandparents about what things used to be like is also low tech and also highly illegal there.
    • by sakdoctor (1087155) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:38PM (#33846906) Homepage

      I doubt you'll actually bother looking up info on TV/radio ownership in North Korea. I bet your random guessing and stabbing in the dark will get +5 Insightful.

      On a tangential ramble, Kim Jong-Il's Comedy Club [bbc.co.uk] was a very interesting documentry, and a rare glimse inside the weider-than-fiction world of North Korea.

      • by westlake (615356) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @04:39PM (#33847286)

        In the early ninties, a country profile for the Library of Congress estimated that North Korean had about 250,000 television sets and 3.75 million radio sets, all fixed to receive only government broadcasts. Visitors cannot bring a radio into the country.

        Radio and TV sets in North Korea are pre-tuned to government stations that pump out a steady stream of propaganda. The state has been dubbed the world's worst violator of press freedom by the media rights body Reporters Without Borders (RSF).

        Press outlets and broadcasters - all of them under direct state control - serve up a menu of flattering reports about Kim Jong-il and his daily agenda. North Korea's economic hardships or famines are not reported.
        Ordinary North Koreans caught listening to foreign broadcasts risk harsh punishments, such as forced labour. The authorities attempt to jam foreign-based and dissident radio stations.
        The "only glimmer of hope", according to RSF, is the "communications black market" on the North Korean-Chinese border. Recordings of South Korean TV soaps and films are said to circulate.
        North Korea country profile [bbc.co.uk] [Oct 2, 2010]

        • The state has been dubbed the world's worst violator of press freedom by the media rights body Reporters Without Borders (RSF).

          Huh, you must be referencing an older report. Allow me to bring you up to date on 2010's assessment [rsf.org] of the illustrious Democratic People's Republic of Korea!

          Internet: Nothing but a vague rumor

          A very limited Intranet has developed, consisting of an email inbox, a few news sites relaying regime propaganda, and a browser providing access to the databank Web pages of the country’s three biggest libraries: the Grand People’s Study House and those of the Kim Il-Sung and Kim Chaek Universities. This Intranet is accessible only by academics, businessmen and high-ranking civil servants who have received special clearance.

          Here's to hoping that once that intranet is connected to our internet we see those academics online :)

          Oh, also, I like how one hour of internet usage in a cafe in North Korea will set you back $8.19 (high even by my cushy American standards) and yet the monthly wage in North Korea is a paltry $17.74. So yeah, go ahead and walk into an internet cafe and blow a month's salary in two hours. I almost feel guilty about bitching about Comcast's $40/month cable internet.

          Furthermore Eritrea beat them out in 2009 [rsf.org] leaving them at 174/175 on their worst violators ... there are nation states and there are sad states. I wish there was a non-detrimental way to help the people inside North Korea.

      • Given the replies that while there are TVs and radios they're inspected regularly and have to certified to pick up only specific frequencies, I'd say I was close. The information-starved will remain so. They might open the borders enough to pull a China and sell what amounts to slave labor but human rights certainly won't follow.

      • He may have been stabbing in the dark, but he was sort of right. TV ownership according to wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_of_North_Korea [wikipedia.org] ) is 55 in 1000 households, while radio is more widespread. However all TV and radio sets are pre-tuned to government channels and sealed so the tuning cannot be changed (which carries sever penalties if you did manage it). And in any case foreign radio stations that can be picked up in NK are jammed.
      • by jez9999 (618189)

        "Sorry, this programme is not available to watch again"

        Yay for the licence fee! Thank god we have such a cool broadcaster.

    • You are missing the point. They haven't got internet for their citizens to use, they have it to tell the world know how wonderful things are in North Korea. Its a shame they did not go with '.nk' though - there are far more interesting domain name possibilities for that domain...
  • by The Fanta Menace (607612) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:29PM (#33846858) Homepage

    ...that the average North Korean even has a computer to access the internet with.

    • by St.Creed (853824) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:34PM (#33846890)

      True... but this means we can send as much spam, 911-mails and virusbombs as we like to North Korea, without hurting innocent bystanders :)

      It's sort of like painting a big red target on any spot housing party officials, except only visible in the virtual world. And if they went with 3G or mobifi or something, it would be visible in the real world as well.

      • True... but this means we can send as much spam, 911-mails and virusbombs as we like to North Korea, without hurting innocent bystanders

        Close! But it's the other way around. What it really means is new targets for hackers and botnets, and news ip blocks from which to send SPAM. Looks like I'll be able to trade in my old BMW for a new Audi sooner than expected.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      It's part of the newest Five Years plan. North Korea is going to increase their MMORPG gold harvesting capacity.
    • by Blain (264390) <slashdot@bCOWlainn.com minus herbivore> on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:57PM (#33847046) Homepage Journal

      If you look at the satellite photo of the world at night (http://www.bertc.com/subfour/truth/night2.htm), it's quite easy to see North Korea -- it's the dark space just West of Japan, and north of the very bright lights of South Korea -- the DMZ is a visible line between light and darkness. Just one little spot of light in the whole country, and the rest is darkness.

      The average North Korean doesn't have power, and isn't sure they'll have enough food to eat today.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Threni (635302)

        > The average North Korean doesn't have power, and isn't sure they'll have enough food to eat today.

        Don't knock it, champ. Korean food is the dog's bollocks!

      • by Kenja (541830)
        Lil' Kim told me that they have abundant free electricity in the glorious peoples republic. But you have to BELIVE to see it.
      • How does a night shot proves that people in DPRK do not have power?
        • by Blain (264390)

          Prove? I'm not sure how one would prove such a thing, but it's pretty good evidence, at least. What would they be doing with their power if not use it to light up the darkness at night?

          • Maybe they prefer to sleep at night, or their night life sucks. Just because their cities do not look like Christmas trees at night hardly proves they do not have energy to watch TV during the day. This picture is whored every time there is an article on DPRK and while amusing on it's own it in no way points to supposed underdevelopment of the North.
            • by KenSeymour (81018)

              Why argue about about electric power? You can find North Korean famine graves on
              Google Earth.

              http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/north-korea-uncovered-palaces-labour-camps-and-mass-graves-1711573.html [independent.co.uk]

              That's some economy they've got going there. From what I have read, North Koreans
              that live in the north have access to the Chinese border. Some with savings cross the border,
              buy a large can of cooking oil, and resell small bags of oil for people to buy for special
              occasions. They wouldn't be able to

            • by Blain (264390)

              Huh? I wasn't aware that anyone outside the propaganda wing of the Kim Regime had any illusions about how sucky life is in the DPRK. Yes, it's possible that North Korea is uniquely dark at night for a populated country because everyone there turns out all their lights at night, unlike everyone else in the world who has ever had electricity. Perhaps they also, uniquely in the history of the world, grow abundant food, but choose not to eat it so they can starve to death in droves. But there would need to

    • I also seriously doubt that the people in charge of the .kp domain care much about the average North Korean. Every country on earth, no matter how poor, has its rich and powerful class, who these days are pretty much guaranteed to have a computer and the infrastructure for an internet connection.

      And historically, totalitarian governments have been obsessed with compiling, storing, and organizing information. The internet, you may have noticed, is very good for this.

      • by Pharmboy (216950)

        And historically, totalitarian governments have been obsessed with compiling, storing, and organizing information. The internet, you may have noticed, is very good for this.

        The internet is good for storing information? Since when? It is great for DISPLAYING information, and sharing it, and for finding videos of nut shots, but it doesn't actually "store" anything. When a site goes down permanantly, so does all the information unless archive.org has a copy, and if they go down, no one has a copy.

        The intern

    • by will_die (586523)
      Heard one recent comparision on NPR from an author doing a book on north korea. It went something like this:
      In the western world a person is middle class if they can afford multiple cars, a nice house, have no problems food or clothing and have the money to spend on other items. In North Korea you are considered middle class if you can afford to eat a single chicken egg by yourself once a week.
  • by OnePumpChump (1560417) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:40PM (#33846922)
    This is just going to be for more external propaganda. The very act of using this domain IS propaganda.

    Even if it does indicate more internal dissemination of information, more information isn't always good, if it's more of the same disinformation.
  • by el_tedward (1612093) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:43PM (#33846952)

    From the effin' article:

    "While Internet access is believed to be available to small group of elite members of the ruling party, the rest of the country is not permitted access to outside sources of news." :(

  • by Nidi62 (1525137) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:45PM (#33846966)
    The real reason for this is that Kim Jong Il's cognac distributor went electronic and he needed to provide a contact email. Kim Jong Il knew the only domain for a email address he could trust is one Norht Korea owned, so they had to make .kp.
  • ...just about every other national domain has been (ab)used by people thinking of ways to use the letters in "cute" ways, this will doubtless be used the same way. North Korea won't care - money is money. Though I just can't see Kim Possible fans being amongst the takers.

  • let the mass hacking of .kp domains start.
  • by bkmoore (1910118) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:56PM (#33847044)
    North Korea, or the "Democratic Peoples' Republic of Korea" as they like to call themselves is a criminal state that murders its own citizens while denying them even the most basic human rights such as freedom of movement. The only North Koreans who will be blogging or communicating on these web sites will be ones from the Propaganda and Agitation ministries. North Korea has lost a lot of face over abducting Japanese and South Korean citizens, shooting down a Korean airliner, sinking a Korean destroyer, and the mass starvation after the collapse of the Soviet Union. North Korea wouldn't even exist if it weren't for external support from the Soviet Union, and later on China and South Korea. The only legitimate government on the Korean peninsula is the Republic of Korea. The regime in North Korea are a bunch of criminals and they maintain the largest prison in the world. Hopefully one day it will all end peacefully the same way that East Germany dissolved as soon as the Soviets refused to crush the crowds of demonstrators with their tanks.
    • by SmallFurryCreature (593017) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @04:33PM (#33847256) Journal

      The above is accurate ALTHOUGH the accusations COULD be put on different countries. The USSR shot down a korean plane that came into its airspace and the US has shot down a Iranian airliner claiming it was an wave of fighter aircraft (despite being far slower climbing constansly and only firing ONE missle at SEVERAL incoming aircraft (real naval action would have been to throw everything at incoming fighters including the kitchen sink after the experience at the falklands)) and as for mas starvation, how many indians died of that again after forced relocation to inhostipable regions of the US to make way for white settlers?

      Ancient history? Yeah, that is convenient BUT this ancient history IS being remembered by people around the globe who use it to excuse their own injustices. It is a very powerful excuse. China does not want north korea but it wants the vassal state of south korea even less. That would mean US forces right at its borders. North Korea abducting Japanse citizens? Gosh, somehow I don't see China caring. That would be like Israel caring about germans getting killed. Japan is not wel liked in the region. Something about being a nation riddled with war crimes and never making attonement for it might have something to do with it.

      And so North Korea continues to happen. As a buffer against the US as a way of saying "No, rampant captalism will NOT overrun the entire world" as a way of not having to answer just why this was allowed to go on.

      And lets face it, IF NK is going to collapse, who is going to pay for it? The reunification of germany cost western germany dearly and is still not going smoothly. The collapse of the USSR has made the world less safe and make life in those regions far less free. One dictartorship fell, countless replaced it.

      The world ain't a nice place. NK is one of most not nice places around but it happens because the rest of the world isn't nice enough to stop it. And that includes people like BKMOORE, the parent, who claim SK is only legitimate government... yah. That government never did any wrong. Nope...

      AND that is what fuels division and allows NK to exist. If you want to change the world, you got to start with yourself. SK is puppet government that has become legit because it has made economic success so people forgot about the past. If you want to convince the NK that it must change its way, claiming money makes right is not going to do it.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 09, 2010 @06:30PM (#33847954)

        Japan is not wel liked in the region. Something about being a nation riddled with war crimes and never making attonement for it might have something to do with it.

        Japan has both apologized and pay reparations numerous times. What more do you want them to do? Resurrect the dead?

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_war_apology_statements_issued_by_Japan

        • Not that simple. (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Estanislao Martínez (203477) on Sunday October 10, 2010 @03:03AM (#33850414) Homepage

          Japan has both apologized and pay reparations numerous times. What more do you want them to do? Resurrect the dead?

          The story is much more complicated than that; you're being selective with the facts here. There are a few issues about Japan's attitudes towards its past that still bother the heck out of a lot of people:

          1. In a lot of people's minds, Japan hasn't apologized and paid repairs for everything that they ought to. One of the most famous cases is the WWII comfort women [wikipedia.org].
          2. The apologies you cite were made by the government of Japan, but there are significant segments of the Japanese public who are much less apologetic about their country's deeds in the first half of the 20th century. There's a lot of folk who would rather pretend Japan's misdeeds never happened, and worse, significant revisionist trends about them. In recent years, these have surfaced as controversial revisions of school history textbooks [wikipedia.org] (yeah, kinda like recently in Texas).
          3. There's the controversial visits by Japanese politicians to Yasukuni Shrine [wikipedia.org], a Shinto shrine dedicated to fallen soldiers, which many feel it goes to lengths to glorify Japan's war criminals. The shrine is run privately, and the folks who run it are noticeably right-wing and revisionist about Japan's role in WWII.

          The trend is pretty clear: there is a significant conservative segment of the Japanese population whose attitudes just piss off the rest of the region, and there are many politicians who pander to them.

    • by gmuslera (3436)
      To be criminal mean i.e. to go against the laws of your country. If you define the laws, and go according to them, then you aren't a criminal, whatever the laws of another countries say. In fact, under the laws of another country, you or your government could be criminals (think how far from that was Bush last period). Not so much defending North Korea, just attacking that way of reasoning.
      • To be criminal mean i.e. to go against the laws of your country. If you define the laws, and go according to them, then you aren't a criminal, whatever the laws of another countries say. In fact, under the laws of another country, you or your government could be criminals (think how far from that was Bush last period). Not so much defending North Korea, just attacking that way of reasoning.

        There are also international treaties, such as the one that created the United Nations. Any signatory to the U.N. chart

        • Regardless of whether North Korea is a signatory or not its leaders can still be tried and convicted as criminals in the International Criminal Court. The court statute allows it to try cases even when the accused is not a national of a country that accepts the court's jurisdiction, if the case is referred to it by the UN Security Council. Not that this would even happen in case of North Korea.
      • by hey! (33014)

        Well, you put your finger on the essential issue. Who gets to define what is lawful?

        Appealing to "International Law" does not really get you anywhere, especially with a country that isn't a signatory to international conventions.

        For example, the standard in maritime law that was pretty much universally observed was that a state enjoyed sovereignty over waters ou to three miles from its coast. Then the US and a bunch of other nations got together and extended sovereignty to 12 miles plus a 200 mile "Exclus

        • by gmuslera (3436)
          Lets give a twist to that. If in the (recent) past US government captured a lot of "suspects" of terrorism, imprisioned and tortured them without even proving that were guilty, even some of them were minors, and maybe some died in the process, how different would be from North Korea, regarding an hypotetical international law? And who will inflict punishment for that if is in fact a superpower the one doing it?

          Is no reason to "misbehave" because others do, but still don't complain about someone else when yo
    • by copponex (13876)

      North Korea is another result of the Cold War that has yet to be resolved. External influences and pressures created the State, and are unlikely to correct it without causing serious damage.

      Facilitating the deterioration of North Korea would likely lead to an extremely dangerous situation involving millions of refugees, Russia, China, Japan, and the United States. And frankly, that's the reason Kim Jong Il and the necrocracy there still rules. Being next door to China and Russia, the United States doesn't w

    • The only legitimate government on the Korean peninsula is the Republic of Korea.

      Legitimate? The only legitimate government is the one that can maintain power. It has always been so, throughout history.

  • by TomHandy (578620) <tomhandy@@@gmail...com> on Saturday October 09, 2010 @03:59PM (#33847060)
    mud.kp.
  • Hooray! (Score:4, Informative)

    by frank_adrian314159 (469671) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @04:03PM (#33847084) Homepage

    Now maybe we'll get Voice of Korea (was Radio Pyongyang) streamed on the internets! That's some good agitprop: "Today, Glorious Leader stated that he is pleased at the 3000% increase in rice production announced by the Ministry of Agriculture. The running dog capitalist Western press had no comment on our great achievement." Really! They still broadcast stuff like this. It really doesn't get any better, comedy-wise.

    • Re:Hooray! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by hedwards (940851) on Saturday October 09, 2010 @04:15PM (#33847162)
      Well, considering how many people in the US still think we're the best at absolutely everything, it's not that hard to believe. It's just with the better access to information they have to keep it somewhat within the realm of possibility.
      • nationalism is not a trait unique to the usa, nor north korea, not brazil, china, india, switzerland, norway, etc...

      • Well, considering how many people in the US still think we're the best at absolutely everything, it's not that hard to believe.

        It's a lot easier to believe reports that your country is doing well when you own a house, have a decent car and a good job, and already have eaten one meal this morning with the almost certainty of having two more later in the day.

  • North Korea to outside world web connection severed by the North Korean government in 3....2....
  • I'm betting their computers are like their tv's.. a cardboard box with the glorious leader's picture on it.

  • "dig kp. SOA" - nothing so far. Is this article a hoax?

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Googling for site:.kp shows two different domains (kcce.kp and friend.com.kp) but nothing resolves here.

  • So, to go with Gijeong-dong [wikipedia.org] we're going to have websites that show North Korea as being lovely and wonderful and maybe you should come across the border and join the glorious revolution.
  • ...to look for (and remove) certificates for North Korean Certificate Authorities. Oh this is going to go sooooo well.....
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 09, 2010 @05:11PM (#33847480)

    I have some scripts which periodically scan DPRK ips, and found a few things recently.

    There is a news site at http://175.45.179.68

    There are a couple http/https servers with self-signed certs for domains which dont yet exist:
    176.45.176.6/7

    And there are cisco routers at 175.45.176.131, 175.45.177.193,194,197,198,201

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I'll add stuff as I find it...

      smtp:
          175.45.176.10
          175.45.176.11
      ftp:
          175.45.176.12

      J

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        250 spinef1.star.net.kp
        MAIL FROM:kimjongil@spinef1.star.net.kp
        250 sender ok
        RCPT TO:kimjongil@spinef1.star.net.kp
        550 #5.1.0 Address rejected.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      telnet 175.45.179.67 110
      Trying 175.45.179.67...
      Connected to 175.45.179.67.
      Escape character is '^]'.
      +OK Microsoft Exchange 2000 POP3 server version 6.0.4417.0 (email.kp.col.cn) ready.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by chazchaz101 (871891)
      Why on earth is all the text on that news site in Arial except the names Kim Jong Il and Kim Il Sung, which are always in Tahoma?
      • by coryking (104614)

        Branding. Gotta be his signature font. Probably nobody else gets to use times new roman.

        Or an artifact of translation? Who knows!

  • More information (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Arancaytar (966377) <arancaytar.ilyaran@gmail.com> on Saturday October 09, 2010 @05:17PM (#33847498) Homepage

    it will bring more information to the information-starved masses of North Korea

    I tried to read that aloud with a straight face but failed miserably.

  • I see a site: www.faxesofevil.kp...it appears to be a free internet fax service.

  • When will the first North Korean porn site open?

    And how long after that will it be taken down?

    And how long after that will its proprietors be executed?

  • 175.45.179.68 [175.45.179.68]

    They appear to like RHEL:
    175.45.176.6 [175.45.176.6]
    175.45.176.7 [175.45.176.7]

  • "....but the news is promising if in fact it will bring more information to the information-starved masses of North Korea." ....You're trying to be funny, right?

  • "...but the news is promising if in fact it will bring more information to the information-starved masses of North Korea".

    I don't see why the existence of ".kp" domains will bring more information to the folks in North Korea, any more than the words
    "Democratic People's Republic" in the country's official name would make it owned by the people, democratic, or a republic.

    Labels have power, sure, but not always the way one hopes.

  • by Guppy (12314) on Sunday October 10, 2010 @02:21AM (#33850266)

    Anyone remember Kremvax [jargon.net]? Started out as a hoax, but eventually becamse something real.

    In an even more ironic historical footnote, kremvax became an electronic center of the anti-communist resistance during the bungled hard-line coup of August 1991. During those three days the Soviet UUCP network centered on kremvax became the only trustworthy news source for many places within the USSR. Though the sysops were concentrating on internal communications, cross-border postings included immediate transliterations of Boris Yeltsin's decrees condemning the coup and eyewitness reports of the demonstrations in Moscow's streets

    Who knows, perhaps someday the nascent net in Korea will lead to something greater?

  • nuts.kp [kpnuts.com]

  • I registered bit.kp for use as a URL shortener, in honor of Kim Jong-il's adorable short stature. What could possibly go wrong?

    Oh, crap. They just repossessed it. I better go blog about this!

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