Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Google Sony Television Entertainment Technology

Sony HDTVs To Come With Google TV Interface 124

Posted by samzenpus
from the TV-team-up dept.
adeelarshad82 writes "Even though Google recently announced its own Google TV, seems like their partnership with Sony is going to make it obsolete. Google has partnered up with Sony to launch four HDTVs loaded with the Google TV interface, as well as a Google TV Blu-ray player. The company's Google TV products will be called Sony Internet TV. With the Google TV, Sony aims to provide a clean and easy way to browse the Web, watch TV, and run applications all on your HDTV. Google TV uses the true Chrome Web browser with Flash 10.1. Unfortunately though, at the moment it only has a handful of apps available but Sony said the OS will be updated in early 2011 to include the Android Market app with more options."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Sony HDTVs To Come With Google TV Interface

Comments Filter:
  • No one cares about the current and planned IPTV offerings.
    Cable/satellite companies will never let them mature into anything worthwhile.
    Sony.

    Reasons Slashdot will shit on this:
    Flash.

    • by Facegarden (967477) on Wednesday October 13, 2010 @04:58PM (#33887612)

      No one cares about the current and planned IPTV offerings.
      Cable/satellite companies will never let them mature into anything worthwhile.
      Sony.

      Reasons Slashdot will shit on this:
      Flash.

      Its not so much IPTV like AT&T U-Verse, that requires everyone to agree on how it works, its just web TV, like Hulu. I already use Hulu as my main source of TV, and don't have cable, just internet, with a media center hooked up to the TV.

      Plenty of people would do that too if it were built into to their TV already.

    • by DragonWriter (970822) on Wednesday October 13, 2010 @05:08PM (#33887718)

      No one cares about the current and planned IPTV offerings.

      This isn't an IPTV offering. Its simply a Web + TV offering. It does incorporate access to existing Web video sources, but primarily the TV (content) part comes from whatever normal TV signal source you have.

      Cable/satellite companies will never let them mature into anything worthwhile.

      Which is probably why GoogleTV is designed primarily (for now) to bring existing Web content to your TV screen and enhance rather than replace traditional cable/satellite (or, AFAIK, broadcast) TV.

      Sony.

      Sony hasn't really been all that bad at selling TVs and other media products, so as much as some people may be upset about some things Sony has done in the past, I don't think that's a reason that the product will fail.

  • by alen (225700) on Wednesday October 13, 2010 @04:51PM (#33887526)

    i predict google TV will be integrated into most TV's in the next 3-5 years which means every TV will soon ship with Flash

    no need to fire up the computer for the porn tube sites

    • Re: (Score:1, Offtopic)

      by c0lo (1497653)

      i predict google TV will be integrated into most TV's in the next 3-5 years which means every TV will soon ship with Flash

      no need to fire up the computer for the porn tube sites

      No worries. Jobs will follow with his release of iGoogleTV (err... ooops... I mean, iTV), without flash and with tight control over access to porn. By that time, the fanboys/girls will already have children of their own, be interested in protecting them (from exposure to Flash) and still look kool when having guests.

      • Jobs will follow with his release of iGoogleTV (err... ooops... I mean, iTV), without flash

        "Without Flash" has been used as a code word for "with technologies under the HTML5 banner", including the <video> element.

        and with tight control over access to porn.

        If iOS for Apple TV gets an update to add a Safari browser comparable to the one on iPod touch, iPhone, and iPad, and this Safari has H.264 streaming <video>, how do you expect Mr. Jobs to control what <video> users watch?

      • by dangitman (862676)

        No worries. Jobs will follow with his release of iGoogleTV (err... ooops... I mean, iTV), without flash and with tight control over access to porn. By that time, the fanboys/girls will already have children of their own, be interested in protecting them (from exposure to Flash) and still look kool when having guests.

        So, you support children being exposed to flashers? Pervert.

  • Terrible summary. (Score:5, Informative)

    by Facegarden (967477) on Wednesday October 13, 2010 @04:55PM (#33887576)

    Paraphrasing since copy-paste isn't working (did slashdot do that on purpose or is my computer on crack?)

    "Even though google annouced their own google tv... their partnership with sony will make it obsolete..."

    Anyway.. whaaaa? Did the person writing this even read about Google TV? Google didn't announce a TV... the announced a software platform called Google TV, which sony is using. So the partnership isn't going to make it obsolete... it's USING Google TV!

    Such a terrible summary its actually weird. Also, nice random semicolon.
    -Taylor

    • by Lunix Nutcase (1092239) on Wednesday October 13, 2010 @04:59PM (#33887630)

      Such a terrible summary its actually weird.

      One word: sampenzus.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      I can't paste into the text box on /. either. I am using chrome. Using IE it works fine.

    • by Trufagus (1803250)

      And a couple of days ago there was an article about how Apple had started allowing Bluetooth data communications. Not only was this totally wrong (nothing had changed) but anyone who knew anything about Bluetooth on phones or who researched the topic for 5 minutes would have known this.

      I think summaries like these are (and should be) very embarrassing for slashdot.

      Are the editors here paid or are they volunteer (I will cut them more slack if they are volunteers)?

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by onkelonkel (560274)
        The editors are undoubtedly volunteers. Or possibly they got their jobs through some sort of "hire the mentally challenged" program. If they were regular employees they would have all been fired 10 times by now.
    • by Osgeld (1900440)

      Also ...

      no one currently owns a TV and no one else aside from sony makes them

  • by cmiller173 (641510) on Wednesday October 13, 2010 @04:55PM (#33887580)
    Google did not announce it's own Google TV, Google announced Google TV products from partners Sony and Logitech. Which is what they were saying all along. May: http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/10/05/20/198242/Google-TV-Announced-With-Intel-Sony-and-Logitech [slashdot.org]
    • by lennier1 (264730)

      True

      In case of Android they needed something to push the fairly young platform and explore some possibilities. Therefore they contracted out the production of their own featured handset.
      But with their TV platform there's already the precedence of Android's market penetration and Google's video acquisitions. This made it easier to find strategic partners for the new product.

  • Good idea (Score:3, Interesting)

    by iONiUM (530420) on Wednesday October 13, 2010 @04:58PM (#33887618) Homepage Journal

    I think if all TVs had this it would be great. Built in surfing capabilities with WiFi? Who wouldn't want that, and what reason could you argue not to have it?

    If it becomes a standard feature, then you could just buy a TV (with it) and not even use it if you don't want it. The only downside is devices like AppleTV will become obsolete. Well, "down side".

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by twidarkling (1537077)

      I can come up easily with reasons not to have it.

      Best one? Cost. TVs are already expensive, and to stick a wireless nic in there would tack another $50+ on the price easily, for something I neither want nor need due to my set up far surpassing the need to hook my TV up to my network.

      How about stability? Make TVs more complicated, all of a sudden my TV might start crashing, and I won't be able to do anything about it, unless the manufacturer includes an update down the road.

      How about signal interference? Mak

      • by geekoid (135745)

        TV's are cheap, considering what you are getting, and a wi-fi seutp up might be an additional 2 dollars... maybe.

        Why a wi-fi set up would cause your tv to crash is beyond me, and I know how they design TVs.

        A TV is full of features most people won't use. I don't use all my HDMI. but it would be stupid of me to bitch they are to many of them.

      • by timeOday (582209)
        It's not like Wi-Fi in a TV is a new thing, most Sony TVs already have Wi-Fi [sonystyle.com] because they can play the Bravia Internet Video service which includes netflix, youtube, hulu plus (soon), and a bunch of other junky little video sources that appear half-baked.

        PS, Sony's page I linked already features the GoogleTV, so I guess they are serious.

        I can't speak for google TV, but playing from Netflix is great. It's very convenient, and the HD stream looks better than DVD. (I do still have a PVR connected as wel

        • by thijsh (910751)
          I already bought an Acer TV with Wifi [cnet.com.au] in 2006... It's only too bad Acer discontinued this line, it could have become really great... And yes, the built in PC with LAN and Wifi did run linux (but the default menu is pretty useless, and the software hasn't been updated since 2006 too).
          • by adolf (21054)

            Fast forward a few years. Imagine that it's 2014, and someone has a similar complaint:

            "I already bought a Sony TV with Wifi in 2010... It's only too bad Sony discontinued this line, it could have become really great... And yes, the built in PC with LAN and Wifi did run linux (but the default menu is pretty useless, and the software hasn't been updated since 2010 too)."

            • by thijsh (910751)
              Funny, but sadly probably true... That is the problem when it's locked down and the server software isn't open sourced... otherwise the community would have created a great front-end for the PC with transcoding and everything (I only got as far as getting a busybox shell running on the TV, but trying to reverse engineer their proprietary software is a bit more than one man can manage). Instead of dealing with the crappy propietary software I just went back to using my open source Kiss player (which was the
              • by adolf (21054)

                Maybe...

                I see it as just the same thing as built-in VCRs, and later DVD players, which were somewhat common especially toward the end of the CRT age. Neat, tidy, works (for various definitions of "works"), cannot be changed for something that works better, and is eventually broken or is deprecated for a new format. All it does is give the user a little temporary freedom from having an external player, usually at substantial cost.

                And once it breaks/becomes deprecated, the extra componentry which was added

                • by thijsh (910751)
                  That's exactly what I realized, and I waited for years until a platform came around that was affordable (looked into Pentium-M for desktop before but the price was really high) and could play decent video while keeping the power usage low... So I recently bought an ION PC [asrock.com] (power use generally under 20watt), works like a charm (downloads my torrents better than my previous big-ass media-box which consumed closer to 200watt, I figured I'll have the investment back in 2 years based on power alone).

                  My next 'T
      • Re:Good idea (Score:4, Interesting)

        by adolf (21054) <flodadolf@gmail.com> on Wednesday October 13, 2010 @11:13PM (#33890070) Journal

        Good news!

        Luckily enough, the announcement of Sony using Google TV in some of their newest HDTVs did not also include an announcement of the discontinuation of other models which do not include Google TV!

        That's right: You'll still be able to buy a TV without all of this gee-wizardry, and it will cost less than than the newfangled kit described in TFA!

        If you want to keep things this way, then just keep voting with your wallet and companies will keep making simple TVs that folks like you (and I) like. It's easy, it's fun, and it saves money!

        (My own 52" Samsung LCD is nearly as brain-dead as can be. It simply displays video, and occasionally does a little bit of video switching. It doesn't handle audio, it doesn't view Netflix, it doesn't have a built-in Blu-Ray player, and it certainly doesn't fucking run Google TV. And nor will its replacement. It does, however, do a fine job of displaying video. I have other toys for those those other sorts of roles, and want as little co-dependence between them as possible. And I'll keep buying things in such a fashion as to support the ongoing manufacture of stuff that allows doing stuff in this way.)

    • Re:Good idea (Score:4, Insightful)

      by OldeTimeGeek (725417) on Wednesday October 13, 2010 @05:12PM (#33887742)
      Who wouldn't want that, and what reason could you argue not to have it?

      Because the components will become outdated long before the TV portion does and the only way to update will be to replace the entire thing. Or do you actually think it will be based on an open architecture that will allow replacement of components and still remain in warranty? Sorry, not for me.

      • by geekoid (135745)

        I am using the same wi-fi device I was using 8 years ago.

        Seriously, your argument is pretty thin.

        • And I have had three TVs over the past thirty years. In that time, I have had to fix or replace VCRs, LaserDisc players, TiVos and just about everything else that I've plugged into them because of a failure of one sort or another. The cost of all of them together was cheaper than a new TV. The fewer additional components, the less chance I'll have problems.
        • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Your wifi device/router has horrifically slow data rates, is limited to 11-13 channels, operates in a frequency subject to massive interference, is borderline unusable in many populated areas, probably craps out while torrenting, doesn't support modern open firmware (small flash), and can only stream compressed video between ~15Mb-30Mb/s.

          The hardware powering this TV's browser/Google TV stack will probably appear ancient in 2-3 years.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by demonbug (309515)

        Who wouldn't want that, and what reason could you argue not to have it?

        Because the components will become outdated long before the TV portion does and the only way to update will be to replace the entire thing. Or do you actually think it will be based on an open architecture that will allow replacement of components and still remain in warranty? Sorry, not for me.

        I agree. I hate that it has become nearly impossible to find a TV that is just a TV. Hell, in most cases even a TV tuner is unnecessary. It would be nice if some manufacturer put out a line of large-size monitors that skip out on all this BS. Just give me a ~55" LCD w/ as many LED backlights as you can, a few HDMI inputs, a couple s-video, component, and composite inputs, maybe a DVI input, and that's it. No speakers, no network interface, definitely no integrated online "experience". Probably don't even ne

  • by DragonWriter (970822) on Wednesday October 13, 2010 @05:02PM (#33887654)

    Even though Google recently announced its own Google TV, seems like their partnership with Sony is going to make it obsolete

    Wrong.

    What Google announced was the GoogleTV platform. In the Google announcement, they announced a series of hardware manufacturer partners that would be developing devices incorporating the platform on TVs, Blu-Ray players, and standalone settop boxes. Sony was one of those.

    Now Sony has announced some of the specific initial products that it will be making that incorporate the GoogleTV platform.

    Unfortunately though, at the moment it only has a handful of apps available but Sony said the OS will be updated in early 2011 to include the Android Market app with more options.

    Which is exactly what Google said when they announced GoogleTV.

  • All I want to know is if my new Sony TV will come with a free root kit pre-installed at the factory?

  • I wonder if there'll be some lawsuit about unfairly bundling the service with the TV, which caused the cable/satellite TV industry to shrivel at long last?
    • by westlake (615356)

      I wonder if there'll be some lawsuit about unfairly bundling the service with the TV, which caused the cable/satellite TV industry to shrivel at long last?

      You mean like Netflix has been bundled with virtually every piece of home theater hardware sold with an Ethernet connection?

  • ...on a TV? Four?

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Animaether (411575)

      Mouse and/or keyboard for those things that just don't work so well with the fancy remote, external HDD to play back content from (instead of a media center thing that plays back over HDMI and needing an HDMI switch), camera/card reader (presuming it doesn't have a built-in card reader)... yeah, those 4 could end up being used simultaneously just fine.

      • Mouse and/or keyboard for those things that just don't work so well with the fancy remote, external HDD to play back content from (instead of a media center thing that plays back over HDMI and needing an HDMI switch), camera/card reader (presuming it doesn't have a built-in card reader)... yeah, those 4 could end up being used simultaneously just fine.

        What about a USB blender to mix me some hard drinks every time a Reality TV show comes on?

    • by geekoid (135745)

      Now I can use it as a docking station for my devices I set next to the TV. Nice. Plus if you are going to put one in, you might as well put four.. All the circuitry will be there.

  • by 0123456 (636235)

    Now even my TV can get infected with malware.

  • by bhcompy (1877290)
    So much for XMB. Unless, of course, this is part of a plan of pushing out PSP phones running on Android.
    • by c0lo (1497653)
      I wonder how long until Sony will start to feel the cannibalistic effects (on PSP) of having Android able to support games... One can only hope for a revival of "entertainment value over 3D effects", Indie producers and so on. How fast would be Valve reacting? I'd be worried about Sony arresting their incarnation of Android... like keeping a very strong control of the App market their TV can access for a while, at least... (until enough competition will emerge... Samsung for instance won't be that fussy).
      • by dangitman (862676)

        I wonder how long until Sony will start to feel the cannibalistic effects (on PSP) of having Android able to support games...

        I'm guessing an extremely long fucking time.

  • by Themer (994454)
    Is this going to include the new patent that allows me the consumer to PAY to skip commercials? Will Sony figure out a way to keep DVR's from skipping commercials so the GOOG gets its cut? If so this should be tagged DoNotWant!
    • by bhcompy (1877290)
      We'll need AdBlock Plus and NoScript for our TVs
      • by bobjr94 (1120555)
        First thing I thought too. Google will be tracking your viewing and inserting its own ads and pop-ups over your shows. Ill save the 400$ extra it costs and get a laptop that I can take out of the front room.
  • by wowbagger (69688) on Wednesday October 13, 2010 @05:44PM (#33888114) Homepage Journal

    And how long will it be until Sony decides to start removing features from this TV, because of alleged concerns about piracy, hacking, moping with intent to creep, or whatever other excuse they come up with?

    "Sorry, we have removed the web browser's ability to visit any site with a vowel in the URL, because some people were visiting sites about how to use their TV to view unapproved content."

    Sorry Sony, you burned me on my PS3, you shall not do so again.

    • by chappel (1069900)

      The PS3? The last straw for me was in 2000 (2001?) when I bought a wildly overpriced network walkman NW-MS9 "MP3" player that wouldn't play MP3s - http://reviews.cnet.com/mp3-players/sony-nw-ms9-network/1707-6490_7-6148779.html [cnet.com]

      Awesome hardware completely crippled for the sake of ensuring no possible way to share a song with it.

      Sony: just say no.

      ch

      • by dangitman (862676)

        The last straw for me was in 2000 (2001?) when I bought a wildly overpriced network walkman NW-MS9 "MP3" player that wouldn't play MP3s

        Why would you do that? Everybody knew those things were shitty. The PS3, on the other hand, is a decent product. With your track record, you probably shouldn't be giving product advice, or even trusting your own instincts.

        Sony makes some great products and some incredibly shitty ones. Making blanket judgements based on brand alone, rather than the merits of individual products, is pretty unintelligent.

      • You know, if you had done any research on the thing before buying it, you would have discovered that it played MP3's by having SonicStage convert them to ATRAC.

        • by chappel (1069900)

          Wow, guess I struck a nerve with the Sony Fanboys. Sure, I could research and find out if a particular Sony product does something underhanded and unexpected, and should have researched the walkman, but I had been really happy with my previous sony products, and had no reason to suspect that if the box SAID it was an MP3 player that they'd be lying. After the ensuing years of proprietary hardware, root-kits, and support for the RIAA, I don't care if they DO happen to puke out a decent product, I know part o

    • Did you even have Linux on your PS3? If even 1/10th of the people who complain about SCEfoo removing Linux support had actually used it, the YDL forums would have been far far more busy. Besides, if you want to keep Linux, you can, you're just shut out of PSN.

      • by wowbagger (69688) on Thursday October 14, 2010 @08:03AM (#33891938) Homepage Journal

        Actually, yes, I did have Linux on my PS3. I had it to experiment with the CBE as a signal processing engine, since that's what I do for a living.

        And not only am I shut out of PSN, I am shut out of any recent games, any new hardware such as Move, potentially out of new Blu-Ray disks, etc. - which I do because all work and no fun makes Wowbagger a dull boy.

        So yes, I DID lose (sorry, loose - I don't want to make you feel uncomfortable) something when Sony took away a feature that they had advertised, that was a part of our sales contract, and that was a part of why I did business with them.

        • I had it to experiment with the CBE as a signal processing engine, since that's what I do for a living.

          Sounds interesting, I'm guessing the SPE's were pretty good at it.

          I had Linux on mine as well, though I'm not a programmer. And yes, I miss having Linux on it, it added more functionality to what was already a device with a lot of functionality. And it let the household get away with only 1 "traditional" x86 PC, since I didn't need to use the PC to do things like read my e-mail or read Slashdot. I was an

        • by IrquiM (471313)
          Meh... I just bought another one, so now I have one which I can run Linux on in my bedroom, and one up to date in my living room...
  • Between Sony's adopted mantra of "Do all evil possible" and Google's of "Do no evil", when they get together that must become "Do nothing".
  • I get the impression from the synopsis that the author doesn't know that Google TV and Sony Ineternet TV are the same thing? I'm not sure how Google TV is going to make Google TV obsolete, but it's sure a head scratcher.

    that being said, this is a horrid idea that has been tried time and time again. Nobody wants an expensive all-in-one device when individual components are typically less expensive and give better results over time. This Sony TV will be fine, until the first Google TV software update th
  • Awesome, yet another device that unsuspecting consumers can get infected with viruses and make our botnet problem even worse. How long before you can buy your favorite flavor of AV product for your telly?
  • Anybody else starting to be a little freaked out about how ubiquitous Google is becoming? I thought phones were cool, but this is starting to scare me. Especially considering the amount of data they collect on us.
  • I'm just waiting for a TV to come with a fully functional, unrestricted and networkable PC built in that uses standard parts and interfaces and is linked to one of the TV inputs.

    • by amorsen (7485)

      You want to replace your TV every 3 years?

      At least this Google TV will use little enough power that you won't feel completely stupid for having it turned on in 3 years, and it doesn't cost double what a comparable TV without Android would cost. In fact, the additional cost seems to be very close to 0.

      What you have proposed has been done several times, typically with Windows Media Center. They didn't sell, for obvious reasons.

  • Nothing to see here (Score:2, Interesting)

    by JoltinJoe77 (1199263)

    All of the apps on any TVs I have personally used have been sluggish and slow to respond. Hooking a computer/media center/game console up to the TV and using apps hosted on those devices has always resulted in a much more pleasant experience for me and my friends. I doubt the introduction to Google apps on TVs will make an impact on anything.

  • Will they be releasing a version for the PS3? Anything would be an improvement over the PS3s craptacular browser.

  • apps for your phone...

    apps for your mp3 player...

    apps for your tablet...

    apps for your ereader...

    apps for your video game console...

    now apps for your friggin' tv...

    i'm sick of apps.

  • A million years ago, my friend and I both received stereo systems from our parents. Each system was from the same store and both made by the same company; his was an integrated system while mine was comprised of separate components. His single box of parts started failing within two years. My receiver lasted thirty years. The takeaway: the display should be just and only that; add functionality with stand-alone (second-generation) components.

Do not simplify the design of a program if a way can be found to make it complex and wonderful.

Working...