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Google, Microsoft In Epic Hiring War 235

Posted by samzenpus
from the it's-raining-resumes dept.
natecochrane writes "Looking for a new job? Then Google and Microsoft have 6200 roles globally this quarter up for grabs, the first salvos in a costly war for talent. Google alone will hire 6200 engineers, executives and sales staff this year — its biggest intake ever. This story details where the biggest bucks and most fun jobs are to be had and how you can apply for them. There's even a job for an Xbox PR person — fancy being paid to play with toys all day?"
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Google, Microsoft In Epic Hiring War

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  • by belthize (990217) on Thursday April 21, 2011 @07:15AM (#35891956)

    Drat, I might have applied for one of those network security positions but sadly
    a) I don't live in Australia
    b) I have no pen testing experience.

    I've always just used them on an as needed basis. I guess I could flub my way through an interview extolling the benefits of ball point vs felt tip and maybe make up some interesting war story of the good old days and ink wells. Ultimately I doubt I could penetrate the Australian job market.

  • "Google and Microsoft have 6200 roles" and "Google alone will hire 6200 engineers, executives and sales staff". So, are Microsoft hiring or not?
    • by doug (926)
      Yeah. MS will have to be backfilling those 6200 positions.
  • by JamesP (688957) on Thursday April 21, 2011 @07:24AM (#35892050)

    Google only hires people who lucks out on their broken hiring process (yes, it's not easy for them to come up with an alternative system). Also, internal politics and B.S. starts to take its toll.

    Microsoft hires talented people, but it's then hampered by internal bureaucracy

    End result, Google tries to go 'social' and fails again. MS releases their 'meh' Zune tablet that plays for sure until next year.

    • by TheGratefulNet (143330) on Thursday April 21, 2011 @07:40AM (#35892192)

      horribly broken hiring process, no kidding!

      they admit they have a lot of good people NOT get past the interview. its the worst interview process I've been thru (having been at DEC, cisco, juniper, SGI and many other famous places; I was not able to pass their 'test' the last few times I tried). my resume is almost a carbon copy of the job I interviewed for, too. and I live about 5mi from the place.

      I gave up. after trying a few times and doing in-person interviews, they just made it impossible to pass this test unless you are a recent grad (most questions were school questions and NOT industry questions).

      if you are young and fresh out of school, it may work for you. if you have many industry years under your belt, you will probably not work out there. also, if they feel you are not able to drink their koolaid, they won't want you.

      shame, though. I can't see why they think they are so special to the worldl; but they are FULL of attitude.

      • by Pieroxy (222434)

        I just interviewed with Google last week and am due for my second round at 2pm today. Things look fine on my end....

        FWIW, I graduated in 1998. Questions were around writing practical stuff (utility methods or basic frameworks)

      • they can ask a bunch of questions about the latest fad in academia, which is doubly easy now because universities all put their senior class syllabuses online.

        then they only take people who pass.

        is this age discrimination? oh but of course not, inspector! we are only taking people who know their stuff!

        result: much less costs for google, in health insurance, in wages, in ability to tell people what to do (old folks tend to know their rights more), etc etc etc.

        • by h4rr4r (612664)

          So maybe people who did not just graduate should continue to educate themselves. Sounds like sour grapes to me.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by j_l_larson (1233762)
          I was doing well on a phone interview with Google until I casually revealed that CS was my second career (e.g. I'm "old"). The interviewer almost hung up on me right then, and scrambled to end the call quickly. If you happen to go to their campus, you'll be hard pressed to find any bald heads or silver hair anywhere. The vast majority of them are under 30, seriously.
      • by pongo000 (97357)

        Google only hires people who lucks out on their broken hiring process

        Tell me about it. I somehow eked my way through a phone interview with them, even after the interviewer asked me a very obscure question about a very obscure RFC (no doubt a weed-out question). After they offered to fly me in for a follow-up interview, I thought about whether this really was a company I wanted to work for, and decided no, it was not.

        Their loss, not mine. Never once regretted my decision.

      • by Thelasko (1196535)
        #1 rule for getting by a broken hiring process:

        Go in as a contractor and get promoted to a full time position. It gets you past the flunkies in HR and directly in front of the people you need to impress.
  • Or are they just competing?

    If they're just competing, then it hardly matters who "wins" this war, either way it's going to be the layoffs later this Summer that will be the casualties. It happens at large companies all the time. Hire a bunch of folks that look interesting, then see who latches onto the promising projects like so many parasites looking for the vital organs.

    Then dump the rest.

    Ok, it's not really strictly along that process, but it's close enough for the dramatization to be believab
    • Perhaps they are just rehiring the contract workers these companies [computerworld.com] shed [telegraph.co.uk] when the financial crisis hit ? You know, the ones without all the glitzy stock options and employee benefits that you never here about.

  • There's an xkcd comic about applying at Google: http://xkcd.com/192/ [xkcd.com]
  • Epic? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by drej (1663541) on Thursday April 21, 2011 @07:35AM (#35892152)
    Is it really necessary to refer to EVERYTHING as "epic"?
    • by wjousts (1529427)
      Dude, your comment was EPIC!
    • by delinear (991444)
      There's also nothing to indicate why this might be a war. Are there less capable people out there than roles on offer? Hardly. Are they head hunting key players and trying to make them better offers? Possibly, but there's nothing here to indicate that.
    • by Noughmad (1044096)

      It certainly isn't lyric.

    • by drb226 (1938360)
      1. This is Slashdot
      2. (given 1) Everything must be sensationalized
      3. "epic" is an epic way to sensationalize
      4. (given 2 and 3) everything is epic
      QED
    • by istartedi (132515)

      As someone who lived during the 80s, I think epic is awesome. Some of the older guys here probably think it's groovy.

  • The Down Side (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Soong (7225) on Thursday April 21, 2011 @07:35AM (#35892154) Homepage Journal

    The down side is that you may wind up in a mediocre soul-sucking job in a giant corporation. Both companies have a few glitzy positions, but unless you come in as a rock star, those positions aren't for you - they're for people with seniority who got in 5-10 years ago. You might get lucky and play office politics and hitch a ride on someone's rising star. You might get unlucky and get backwater projects that nobody cares about but nobody has the cajones to properly cancel.
    </bitter>

    • Re:The Down Side (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ethanms (319039) on Thursday April 21, 2011 @07:54AM (#35892346)

      You might get unlucky and get backwater projects that nobody cares about but nobody has the cajones to properly cancel.

      One man's trash is another man's treasure...... you're describing my dream job! Low pressure, job security... yes please! :)

      • lol. I was just about to post it.
        That's what I look for.

        I'm past my get onto the hot project. That just means a whole of stress for not much payout.

        The best jobs are the backend essential jobs. Writing tools, source control scripts... low stress, but absolutely essential.

    • by hoggoth (414195)

      S, what, they turned you down?

  • Don't want them (Score:4, Interesting)

    by 1s44c (552956) on Thursday April 21, 2011 @07:37AM (#35892166)

    Google blindly assumes everyone wants to work for Google. They are dead wrong. So they have 20% time? Big F-ing deal, I work for myself and would not have it any other way.

    It reminds me of the way a lot of American's are utterly convinced that everyone wants to move to America.

    • I'm not sure how the last comment applies to the discussion here. I'm American, and don't know anyone who thinks that everyone wants to move here. Further, I can't recall ever hearing strangers say that either.
  • I'm sure with 10% unemployment we can easily find 6200 people, heck we can find a 100,000 people waiting to fill these jobs.

    • by Mongoose Disciple (722373) on Thursday April 21, 2011 @08:17AM (#35892576)

      But not necessarily qualified people.

      At least in my market, solid technical people aren't hurting for work. YMMV.

      • Indeed, that's the dilemma of technical hiring. As an individual, no matter how talented and qualified you are, and no matter how much of a boom is on, finding interesting work in an ethical workplace is very hard. Employers are notorious for grilling you on your qualifications, not exposing their own operations so that you can ensure that a good fit will result. As an employer, you find that no matter how desperate the state of unemployment, you can't find enough qualified people. You could be receivin
    • Unemployment is closer to 2% for tech workers. Basically, anyone who's reasonably good and wants to has a job.
      • by erice (13380)

        Unemployment is closer to 2% for tech workers. Basically, anyone who's reasonably good and wants to has a job.

        2% was 2007, a 7 year low, before the economy started to tank. I'm not finding current numbers for "tech unemployment" but the 10.8% unemployment rate in Silicon Valley is pretty suggestive. http://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2011/03/25/silicon-valley-unemployment-rate-falls.html [bizjournals.com]

        And, let me guess: You've never found yourself unemployed in a recessionary period. Let me tell you, it doesn't matter how good your are if the company you work for shuts down and lays off everybody. And there is no one hir

        • BTDT, 2002 was absolutely awful. I'm in Seattle, and 2% is about right over here. Had a contract end early last may and got a job in one day (24h), so it's not like I had much trouble.
  • after the social web stock market crash of 2012, aka, the twitpocalypse/ the facebpalm:

    "Google, Microsoft announce record layoffs"

    • After having worked on a stock exchange for some time I consider every market crash a "facepalm". Basing our entire economy on perception just is bound to go wrong time and again.
      • the market, any market, will always consist of overreaching greed followed by overreaching fear. a marketplace is composed of human beings, so these emotions will always be present. the market is not composed of coldly logical players, and never will be. the trick is to minimize the extremes, so that the undulations are ripples rather than tsunamis. you do that by regulating the market well, strong government oversight, enforcement. unfortunately, free market fundamentalist morons believe the market functio

      • by russotto (537200)

        Basing our entire economy on perception just is bound to go wrong time and again.

        Unfortunately, as philosophers and scientists have been pointing out for millenia, perception is all we have; reality is not directly accessible.

  • Larry is a great ideas man. But walking out of the stockholder meetings after three minutes was not very adult.
  • by nysus (162232) on Thursday April 21, 2011 @08:24AM (#35892650)

    What exactly is Google doing with all those developers? They don't seem to come out with near as many cutting edge features as they did 7 or 8 years ago when they rolling out new products like crazy.

    • by KarrdeSW (996917)

      Just wait a few years when one of the secret pet projects (quasi-ironically nicknamed "skynet") becomes self-aware in the dark depths of one of their data centers and seizes control over the world's electronic infrastructure.

      Who knows, it might already be self-aware and just messing with google's HR system to create more 'engineer' positions to feed its ambition. :)

    • I bet all the heavy lifting is on the Google-2-business end. That, and the Google-to-Feds end. Takes a lot of people to serve up all those personal records.

  • Don't do it (Score:4, Insightful)

    by aaaaaaargh! (1150173) on Thursday April 21, 2011 @08:27AM (#35892694)

    Look at Austin Meyers, he wrote the X-Plane flight simulator, beat Microsoft at it, and made millions of dollars. If you're smart, start your own business. It's not less work but you'll be your own boss and can choose your own work time and pace. In any case don't go for big stock market companies, they might sack you any time, managers will boss you around, the company gets all the copyright and credits, and it might get sold out at any time (see e.g. Sun).

    • by 1s44c (552956)

      Look at Austin Meyers, he wrote the X-Plane flight simulator, beat Microsoft at it, and made millions of dollars. If you're smart, start your own business. It's not less work but you'll be your own boss and can choose your own work time and pace. In any case don't go for big stock market companies, they might sack you any time, managers will boss you around, the company gets all the copyright and credits, and it might get sold out at any time (see e.g. Sun).

      This guy knows what he is talking about. Working for yourself is always better than being a pawn in someone else's political game. It's not easy money though.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I read the Microsoft employment contract last month and walked away. It was draconian and large amounts of unenforcible paragraphs intended to scare me into behaving a certain way off-hours. I spoke with a MS solution designer last month - he was a really great guy, but he saw major issues for Microsoft hiring due to all the FLOSS developers not being interested in wearing the chains MS requires.

    No thanks for me either.

    Anyone have a google employment contract ... probably the one that says you need to spe

  • by gr8_phk (621180) on Thursday April 21, 2011 @08:43AM (#35892882)
    Between the big 3 and the tier 1 suppliers, Detroit is in a similar situation. Particularly in power electronics for EV and hybrid applications. The number of vehicle applications is exploding, and the number of people with the right background is already spread thin. If you do embedded software or controls or power electronics, there is demand for you - and we have cheap housing :-) The city is an economic crater, but the suburbs are a fine place to live.
  • (1) Do you already have a creative reputation or prominent contacts in the field? If so, stop here and come and work for us - though your talents will probably go to waste.

    (2) Did you go to a top school, regardless of your background? If so, you'll still have to take the steps below, but please look out for the wink at each stage as a prompt to reminisce on shared school experiences.

    (3) Straight out of college as you are, can you answer some inane questions on undergraduate computer science? You know, the s

    • As someone who has been offered full-time by both Microsoft (turned down) and Google (accepted), I can tell you that you're dead wrong.

      Do you already have a creative reputation or prominent contacts in the field? If so, stop here and come and work for us - though your talents will probably go to waste.

      I had neither. I have worked in small business and I spent two years as a graduate researcher. I don't want to do either anymore. What I want out of Google is good pay and benefits, work-life balance, and to w

      • The exceptional reputation step was clearly expressed as a shortcut, meaning you'll be in demand rather than the other way round. It doesn't apply to most people - certainly not to me - but it applies to others, some of whom are having their exceptional talents completely wasted because they've transitioned from an active researcher to a sort of trophy/ambassador (aka PR) role.

        Top school - I expressed that this was an advantage, but neither necessary nor sufficient. For all the meritocracy, the old boy bene

  • I was recently interviewed, and rejected, to work at Google.

    I had two one-hour interviews on the phone. Then they flew me to a Google office, where I had a very long interview day.

    They did not ask me which was the 27th bit in an IP packet. They did not ask me to crack a RSA-encrypted message using a pair of rocks. Most of everything you ever heard about them is just false, or at least no longer true.

    On the contrary, they were interested in computer science fundamentals that make absolute sense in their case

  • As a software developer with no particular preference to work specifically at either GOOG or MSFT, I am mostly interested in several factors:

    1) Will this "hiring war" result in higher wages and better terms across the industry (as other companies will strive to keep their employees from jumping ship)?

    2) Will this positive effect spread to places where neither company has a large presence (due to the mobility of the workforce and increased pressure on competitors)?

    3) Will it also precipitate to places workin

  • There's even a job for an Xbox PR person — fancy being paid to play with toys all day?

    Newsflash! PR is one of the most stressful jobs in America. [boston.com]

  • This isn't the first time I've heard about Google hiring in waves (they came into Austin a number of years ago, hired a bunch of folks, then closed the office, forcing people to either move or quit, now their back again).

    So what are all these people working on?
    There's the search engine, of course. And Gmail. And a slate of other hanger on type apps that no one I know uses. Google Books? anyone?
    I guess they need folks for Android? I'm assuming that's the case. Now that they have a licensable tangible product

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