Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Google

More Details On Google Glass 93

Posted by timothy
from the for-all-your-skydiving-conversation-needs dept.
Earlier today we discussed Google's I/O conference keynote presentation, which gave updates on Android 4.1, Google+, the Nexus 7 tablet, and the Nexus Q streaming device. We also got a rather dramatic demonstration of Google Glass, complete with skydiving, bike flips, and rappelling. They followed up with a press conference solely dedicated to Glass, and Timothy was there to cover it. Read on for details about Glass.
As we mentioned earlier, the developers at I/O have the option to buy the 'Explorer Edition' of Google Glass for $1,500. In addition to the (functional, but unfinished) device itself, they also get access to Google's engineers and to keep up with the devices development. Worry not: when the consumer version of the device is finalized, it will be cheaper, but of course they aren't ready to talk about actual prices yet. As for availability: "Less than a year after we get these Explorer Editions out."

Google wants to encourage creative hacking, even if they don't want the developers to immediately put the results in front of users. Sergey said, "Having used a lot of GoPros, what I really want to do is have 5 GoPros along with me — but also Glass, so you can easily capture the data hands-free, that you can see what you're capturing as you do it."

How do you click a web page? Sergey stumbles a bit -- "maybe you should switch to phone or try another device."

For tying into other Google services, and storing all that data, there is instant upload for pictures. Videos are larger, and they haven't finished how that interaction is going to work. The Google Map improvements with 3D views are perfect for viewing with the glasses.

Sergey also talked briefly about safety. Google has a lot of experience with this, particularly from the self-driving car. Speaking to actual experience: compared to driving, where you have distant view, plus dashboard instruments, etc., "This feels much safer." To objections that (say) even heads-up displays on cars are very limited, Sergey counters by pointing out that they only want to present a limited amount of data.

He went on to speak about the design of the glasses. There were two paths they had to choose from. Their initial instinct was to make these as much like glasses as possible; essentially a device disguised as glasses. Sergey said, "When we went through design options, decided, lets be bold .. a lot of people go through a fair amount of effort not to wear glasses; they wear contacts and things like that." So, they discarded glasses and made it an asymmetrical thing, very non-glasses like. He basically sidestepped a question about whether they've worked or are working with makers like Bausch & Lomb on products.

After fielding a few annoying questions about Larry's health, he went on to say Google Glass fits well with the charter of Google Apps, "to take bold risks and push the edges of technology. ... I think we're definitely pushing the limits." It's not all perfect, though. "There've definitely been situations where I felt that we got the software wrong. When you have something buggy and crashing there," he said, gesturing to the camera above his eye, "that's a real problem."

They're currently demonstrating the glasses. We'll have some video of that for you later.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

More Details On Google Glass

Comments Filter:
  • Re:Fears of this (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @05:18PM (#40472779)

    >If I'm involved in an automobile accident, for example, I don't want to be arrested for obstruction of justice if I decide to delete the video.

    This is ridiculous. This has nothing to do with Glass. You're ALREADY guilty of destruction of evidence if you did something like this with a conventional "dash-mounted" camera or something. Why should there be special laws for Google Glass?

  • Re:Seriously dumb (Score:5, Insightful)

    by bhagwad (1426855) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @05:27PM (#40472885) Homepage
    So basically...you can't see any value in this kind of product at all? Let's get the technology going first. We're geeks after all. I'll bother about the other considerations after I finish being excited over the technological aspect.
  • Tracking (Score:4, Insightful)

    by DragonWriter (970822) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @05:47PM (#40473101)

    Honestly what sort of person wants to push their whole life into google's data centres in such detail?

    Most don't, just like most people don't want to give their money or personal information to the companies selling other products or providing other services that rely on access to personal information. Most people would prefer to keep their money and information.

    What people do want is the the benefits they get from using the devices and services. The cost -- in money or information that has to be handed over to get those benefits -- is something that people may be willing to accept as a cost, not something that they "want".

    Between this and the sort of tracking that appears to be happening on their new tablet, for your "convenience" leaves me wondering how much further Google wants to pry into our lives and perhaps something should be done about it.

    Assuming you are referring to the "Google now" feature, that doesn't seem to do any more tracking than Google already has been for a long time, it just leverages the ability to data mine the data Google has stored for the user's direct benefit more.

    Which may make more obvious how much tracking was already going on, and what people can learn by data mining, but it doesn't actually seem to be more tracking.

  • by PeanutButterBreath (1224570) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @05:48PM (#40473109)

    He went on to speak about the design of the glasses. There were two paths they had to choose from. Their initial instinct was to make these as much like glasses as possible; essentially a device disguised as glasses. Sergey said, "When we went through design options, decided, lets be bold .. a lot of people go through a fair amount of effort not to wear glasses; they wear contacts and things like that." So, they discarded glasses and made it an asymmetrical thing, very non-glasses like.

    Yet, many trendy people willing to spend $$$-$$$$ on functionally useless accessories wear frames with non-prescription clear lenses. But I guess such a person is probably not the target market for a pricey, vanity-centric device like Google Glass. . .

    Then there is the fact that eyeglasses are the culmination of generations of research on how to mount something over the human eye in a way that is comfortable during everyday activity. But hey, why not reinvent that wheel?

  • Re:Fears of this (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Zerth (26112) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @08:43PM (#40474435)

    Guess what, you don't get a choice. The other driver and many of the drivers around you will be using it, get subpoenaed and you'll still be pwned.

    Lots of people now have dashcams because they believe that they are more likely to be hit than to cause an accident.

  • Re:Fears of this (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ShanghaiBill (739463) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @10:19PM (#40475025)

    ...Thus proving my point. I'd rather simply not have this, than have it knowing that it can be used against me.

    So don't record video while you're driving.

    Even better: don't drive. If your driving is so bad that you think a recording is more likely to convict you than exonerate you, then you probably shouldn't be on the road in the first place.

Know Thy User.

Working...