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HP Continuing To Flee Windows Reservation With Android Tablet 124

Posted by samzenpus
from the we're-outta-here dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "Hewlett-Packard seems more determined than ever to flee the Windows reservation, unveiling a $170 Android tablet, the HP Slate 7. It runs Google Android 4.1, the first version of the 'Jelly Bean' build, which has been ever so slightly outdated by the recent release of Android 4.2. This isn't the first time in recent memory that HP's opted for a Google product over one offered by longtime partner Microsoft. As it helpfully pointed out in a press release, HP has produced a Chromebook running Google's Chrome OS, a largely cloud-dependent operating system for laptops and notebooks. Built around Google services such as Gmail, Chrome OS also offers access to the Chrome Web Store, an online storefront for apps. If HP and other manufacturers increasingly adopt Google's offerings over Windows, it could cause some consternation among Microsoft executives. Microsoft, of course, is pushing Windows 8, which is meant to run on tablets and traditional PCs with equal facility. If it wants the Windows division to continue as a cash cow, it needs manufacturers to adopt that operating system in massive numbers. Android and Chrome OS could make that strategy a lot more difficult."
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HP Continuing To Flee Windows Reservation With Android Tablet

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  • by rs1n (1867908) on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:11PM (#43009359)
    I cannot help but wonder if UEFI is now Microsoft's backup plan to force casual PC users into Windows 8. There seems to be some resistance (the degree of which is debatable) to Windows 8 adoption. Perhaps users will, in the end, still be forced into Windows 8 if they lack the know-how to use alternate OSes?
    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:19PM (#43009447)

      It would only work by bribing all the vendors... and that would likely cost more than even MS pockets can stand.

      Besides, MS has already insulted the Asian manufacturers, so why would they go out of their way to help MS?

      • by unrtst (777550)

        It would only work by bribing all the vendors...

        Or just enough of the big ones that production and support costs for the alternatives fail to meet similar economies of scale.

        and that would likely cost more than even MS pockets can stand.

        Wrong. It essentially costs them zero. They just need to offer a discount on the Windows OS licenses (and/or other software/hardware/etc). Even if said discount doesn't seem to matter, it does matter in relation to the competition. It's not like we don't have evidence that this has happened in the past, and there's even a better chance of it happening now since they're not as much of

        • by exomondo (1725132)

          That said, I think it WILL have an effect on the number of users running dual boot, and maybe even some that planned on running an alternate OS almost all the time.

          Why would it impact them in that case?

          • by unrtst (777550)

            That said, I think it WILL have an effect on the number of users running dual boot, and maybe even some that planned on running an alternate OS almost all the time.

            Why would it impact them in that case?

            Because they're the ones that aren't 100% committed to Linux or an alternate OS, and they are not only OK with running windows, but choose to do so often enough that they keep it available in dual boot. If restricted boot makes it more difficult to add linux in there as dual boot, it's very very likely to turn off at least some of those people. How many, I don't know.

            • by exomondo (1725132)

              Because they're the ones that aren't 100% committed to Linux or an alternate OS, and they are not only OK with running windows, but choose to do so often enough that they keep it available in dual boot.

              So? It doesn't matter that people aren't '100% committed to an alternative OS', in fact the best scenario is that they not be 100% committed to any OS.

              • by unrtst (777550)

                So? What point are you trying to make?

                My point was that Microsoft can "afford" (even if it isn't done with a cash transaction) to manipulate the market in favor of a restricted boot that favors their OS. Add to this that they have done similar things in the past. Add to this that restricted boot significantly increases the difficulty / technical expertise need to install an alternate OS (including an older release of windows, which was more-or-less the GGGGP's point).

                Going on the premise that:
                * a certain ac

                • by exomondo (1725132)

                  So? What point are you trying to make?

                  My point is it won't affect the number of users wanting to run dual boot, they'll either turn secureboot off or use a signed bootloader.

                  Add to this that restricted boot significantly increases the difficulty / technical expertise need to install an alternate OS (including an older release of windows, which was more-or-less the GGGGP's point).

                  How exactly? Every mainstream distro will ship with a signed bootloader or instructions to turn off secureboot (one bios switch), that's hardly 'significantly more difficult', in fact that step is a whole lot more trivial than the existing process of creating a bootable USB disk and setting the PC to boot from that. Do you also complain about the 'significant difficulty' in

        • by symbolset (646467) *

          The playing one against the other thing used to work. The thing is that making Android devices turns profits for the OEMs lately and making Windows client devices hasn't for the last 10 years. The WPC market has been Dellified, raced to the bottom, and there it will stay. Microsoft is fine with their OEMs cutting each others' throats until they grow too few or one grows too strong, and then they nurture some contenders and hold calls on the dominant one so that the fight will stay fresh and even and reta

    • Casual PC users (Score:5, Insightful)

      by snadrus (930168) on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:44PM (#43009673) Homepage Journal

      That's an interesting term here. Guesses:
      - Light-duty (email, read-heavy web): Best served by Chromebook & tablets:
              They're cheaper & easier to maintain.

      - Upgraders wanting things like before: Likely to defect to the above group.

      - Businesses: Bound to their software, & likely can hold-out until next version
              May try moving to HTML5 cloud software for less administration, but gain OS choices.

    • by exomondo (1725132) on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:48PM (#43009713)

      I cannot help but wonder if UEFI is now Microsoft's backup plan to force casual PC users into Windows 8. There seems to be some resistance (the degree of which is debatable) to Windows 8 adoption. Perhaps users will, in the end, still be forced into Windows 8 if they lack the know-how to use alternate OSes?

      How is that be any different to the way things are now?

      • by RabidReindeer (2625839) on Monday February 25, 2013 @07:12PM (#43009945)

        I cannot help but wonder if UEFI is now Microsoft's backup plan to force casual PC users into Windows 8. There seems to be some resistance (the degree of which is debatable) to Windows 8 adoption. Perhaps users will, in the end, still be forced into Windows 8 if they lack the know-how to use alternate OSes?

        How is that be any different to the way things are now?

        More telling is the fact that to the casual observer (e.g. drooling idiot user), Windows 8 already is an "alternate OS". Which sort of leaves them between a rock and a hard place.

      • by symbolset (646467) *

        How is that be any different to the way things are now?

        Before UEFI and SecureBoot if a business wanted to load an alternative OS on their client PCs it was a simple matter. It has become more difficult. The increase in difficulty is a deliberate attempt to prevent migration. Just the fact that a software vendor is employing its market leverage to make migrating off of their software nigh impossible through technological means should blacklist them from consideration in the enterprise environment. Working with someone who does that is not in your best intere

        • by exomondo (1725132)

          Before UEFI and SecureBoot if a business wanted to load an alternative OS on their client PCs it was a simple matter.

          It still is a simple matter, even if you have a UEFI machine and it's windows 8 certified and it doesn't have any keys other than microsofts and you don't want to use a bootloader signed with microsoft's key and you don't want to sign it with your own key and install that then it is still trivial to turn secureboot off.

          • by symbolset (646467) *

            This dilemma is truly diabolical. The guy who designed it is due a bonus. UEFI puts us on a dilemma with two horns: We can accept it and the vendor lockin it demands, complete with its historical poor security record and the lack of other options. That's one horn. We can disable it and ever after be subject to the question why we disabled a credible cure for Advanced Persistent Threats. That's the other horn.

            The right answer is "migrate to mobile" where we don't have to have these issues and have consi

            • by exomondo (1725132)
              How is that position 'indefensible'? It's exactly the same position we are in now - and have been in for decades - with existing BIOS systems. And I'm not sure what vendor lockin you are talking about, as i said it's only even any kind of an issue if you have UEFI hardware and it's windows 8 certified and it doesn't have any keys other than microsoft's installed and you don't want to use a bootloader signed with microsoft's key and you don't want to sign it with your own key and you don't want to turn secur
    • Huh? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Junta (36770) on Monday February 25, 2013 @07:30PM (#43010103)

      UEFI can and has been booting Linux, Windows 7, Vista (with limitations), and OSX (significant limitations).
      If by 'UEFI', you mean 'SecureBoot', then on x86 platform, so far, I'm willing to believe that malware mitigation is at least part of it (though I question the efficacy), but I think it's giving them, mostly, the facility to lock out competitors on MS 'subsidized' devices like Surface.

      • Re:Huh? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by exomondo (1725132) on Monday February 25, 2013 @07:40PM (#43010191)

        but I think it's giving them, mostly, the facility to lock out competitors on MS 'subsidized' devices like Surface.

        I suspect that if that were the case then they would have prevented SecureBoot from being turned off on the Surface Pro, but they didn't, you can turn it off and install Linux on it if you want.

        • Re:Huh? (Score:5, Insightful)

          by ozmanjusri (601766) <aussie_bob@hotmail.cOPENBSDom minus bsd> on Monday February 25, 2013 @08:42PM (#43010609) Journal

          but they didn't

          Yet.

          This is the extend phase.

          • by exomondo (1725132)

            but they didn't

            Yet.

            They can't retroactively do it either.

            • Not to existing devices.

              But once the frogs appear used to the warmth, the heat will be turned up and they'll be extinguished.

              • by exomondo (1725132)

                Not to existing devices.

                But once the frogs appear used to the warmth, the heat will be turned up and they'll be extinguished.

                What is it you think they are trying to Embrace, Extend and Extinguish? Your conspiracy theory makes no sense, they can't retroactively disable the ability to boot Linux on Surface PCs and if people are using Surface devices to run Linux and then Microsoft releases a Surface that cannot run Linux then people who want to run Linux will just buy another device.

    • by Sir_Sri (199544)

      If it's worth knowing people will know.

      And people know how to install windows 7 on UEFI enabled devices. All of the manufacturers saw windows 8 as a potential train wreck for the industry, and saw Surface as direct competition to themselves, and they want to hedge their bets. If windows 8 had been a huge hit with consumers they would have sucked it up and sold devices competing with MS that they weren't happy with. But Windows 8 is doing relatively poorly it seems like, so all of these back up plans are

    • by symbolset (646467) *
      That is the plan. It would have been a good plan six years ago. Now it just makes the flag logo a warning: this is stuff that doesn't play well with your other stuff. Sort of like the Sony logo, come to think of it.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:12PM (#43009363)

    Sensationalism at its best. Almost everyone makes android tablets. I am no MS fan but I am even less a fan of sensationalism just to get some people to read your bogus stories. Just read the title and felt I had to comment.

    • by Taco Cowboy (5327) on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:26PM (#43009513) Journal

      Sensationalism at its best. Almost everyone makes android tablets. I am no MS fan but I am even less a fan of sensationalism just to get some people to read your bogus stories

      As a long time visitor to /. I have to concur with what you have said

      What is the most unfortunate is that the editors seem to agree with this type of unhealthy yellow-journalism

      HP is merely making another attempt into producing Android tablets. It's only a business decision, that's all !

    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:43PM (#43009669)

      Sensationalism? And duplicate articles? [slashdot.org] In MY slashdot?

      It's more likely than you think!

    • by jedidiah (1196) on Monday February 25, 2013 @09:52PM (#43010957) Homepage

      > Sensationalism at its best. Almost everyone makes android tablets.

      So you're basically agreeing with the "sensationalist" headline.

      PC vendors are finally straying from Microsoft.

      It doesn't matter how you try to spin it. It still comes out the same. Microsoft's grip on consumers as computer users is waning. It took something that looks nothing like a PC, but it finally happened.

    • by Patch86 (1465427)

      The phrasing is sensationalist and overt the top, but the point does still stand. HP is one of the biggest Windows shops there is. Microsoft now has not one but three OSs for touchscreen devices (Windows 8, Windows RT and Windows Phone). Instead of opting for one of these for their new tablet, HP went for Google's product instead.

      That's hardly a vote of confidence in Windows 8/RT's ability to crack the tablet market. Like you say- "everyone" makes Android tablets- even the biggest Microsoft flag wavers.

  • Nice Google ad (Score:2, Informative)

    by PickyH3D (680158)

    The summary even went as far as breaking down what it means to be a Chrome OS-running device while attacking Microsoft at both the start and end of it.

  • Surprising? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by exomondo (1725132) on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:14PM (#43009397)
    This is hardly surprising, with Android smartphones, tablets and chromebooks as well as Google web apps if you've invested in that Google platform - and so many people have - then you probably don't *need* Windows. Not to mention creating a Windows RT tablet doesn't exactly do much in terms of integration for existing Windows customers (that is non-Metro UI users).
    • by Teresita (982888)
      Not so much a Microsoft reservation as a zoo with all the Windows wide open, but the animals stay right where they are because isn't that what they're supposed to do?
      • Also, why should I go hunt when all the food is coming to me anyway.

            Not everyone on Windows is a drooling idiot, some people just have other priorities.

    • This is hardly surprising, with Android smartphones, tablets and chromebooks as well as Google web apps if you've invested in that Google platform - and so many people have - then you probably don't *need* Windows. Not to mention creating a Windows RT tablet doesn't exactly do much in terms of integration for existing Windows customers (that is non-Metro UI users).

      Looks like some MS employees have modpoints - this is about as far from Troll as its possible to get.

    • by tehcyder (746570)

      This is hardly surprising, with Android smartphones, tablets and chromebooks as well as Google web apps if you've invested in that Google platform - and so many people have - then you probably don't *need* Windows.

      I have "invested" in Android (phone and tablet) but I most certainly need a proper OS to do real work on, whether it's Windows, Linux or OSX.

      • by exomondo (1725132)

        I have "invested" in Android (phone and tablet) but I most certainly need a proper OS to do real work on, whether it's Windows, Linux or OSX.

        Yeah that's my point, many of those who are invested in the google platform can be OS agnostic as far as their desktop is concerned.

  • by Trepidity (597) <delirium-slashdot@@@hackish...org> on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:20PM (#43009449)

    It doesn't lead with the "fleeing windows" angle, but here is yesterday's /. discussion on the tablet [slashdot.org], which I'm going to guess covers a lot of what we're about to discuss here...

  • by swschrad (312009) on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:26PM (#43009515) Homepage Journal

    fact is, you have seriously different needs and input technologies between desktop and mobile systems. Win 8 attempts to make them into one system. I can't reach over my desk to touch a screen that doesn't have touch capability anyway, and Live Tiles just clutter things up. Microsoft insists on directing the user to the MS vision, when we liked earlier versions of Windows because we could make the machine "ours". that vision gets in the way. which is why there are Android and IOS/MacOS alternatives gaining on the Redmondonians every hour.

  • by lophophore (4087) on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:27PM (#43009525) Homepage

    No offense to Google; I like their products.

    HP is going to need to do a lot more than market a Chromebook and an Android tablet to get out of the ditch.

    • by unixisc (2429386)
      Besides, why would anybody who remembers the TouchPad fiasco bother to buy a tablet from HP? Be it Windows 8 or Android? LG is a better bet w/ WebOS
  • Not surprised. (Score:5, Informative)

    by tom229 (1640685) on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:29PM (#43009539)
    My girlfriend recently decided to trade in her old boat anchor of a laptop for a new device. Her budget wasn't high (around $500). She came to me for advice and I had an extraordinarily difficult time finding an affordable, light, and fast x86 device. She also wanted a keyboard and trackpad so we ended up settling on an Asus Transformer TF300T. She couldn't be happier. It can do all the things she's interested in doing (facebook, email, pinterest, skype, etc), its fast, easy to use, and fits in her purse.

    I think this is going to be the story going forward for the casual home user. Why buy a bulky laptop or expensive ultrabook? A tablet transformer has a more convenient form factor at all times, and content consumption operating systems like Android are more friendly to the end user.

    I don't see high end gaming or content creation devices going this way any time soon, but the days of the casual home use desktop are coming to an end.
    • Re:Not surprised. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Bearhouse (1034238) on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:38PM (#43009621)

      Mod up. Now, if Libreoffice or, more probably Google, could get "good enough" compatibility with MS Office docs, (including Excel macros, weird PPT presentations and fonts) then this could really go somewhere...

      • by wvmarle (1070040)

        It could be a useful strategy for Google to help LibreOffice or one of its clones with that. And porting the whole thing to Android (which is probably much easier said than done).

        Plus adding a better touch interface for use on Android.

        Proper editing capabilities for Office documents is to me one of the only severe restrictions of Android at the moment. And is indeed what stopped me from considering non-x86 alternatives when getting a new netbook half year ago. The offerings were interesting, but the need of

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I bought a $500 laptop half a year ago, and had no such difficulties. $500 can easily get you a laptop with an i3 CPU, which is much faster than any tablet.

      I guess it depends on your definition of light, though. For me, light is anything that I can throw into a backpack easily.

      • by tehcyder (746570)

        I guess it depends on your definition of light, though. For me, light is anything that I can throw into a backpack easily.

        It sounds like the Apple marketing department's definition of light/thin, i.e. something fractionally lighter/thinner than the competition whose lightness/thinness will totally transform your life from dull, plodding computer user into a breathtakingly attractive artist/musician/poet.

    • by narcc (412956)

      Her budget wasn't high (around $500). She came to me for advice and I had an extraordinarily difficult time finding an affordable, light, and fast x86 device.

      Wow, you must suck at buying computers.

      $500 is more than enough for a great laptop for the "casual home user". Just an example, I picked up an Acer Aspire One 722 to replace my wife' work computer (She just needs internet, email, word, excel) 4GB of RAM, AMD C60 Deul-Core processor, 500GB hard drive -- for $230 dollars. (On Amazon, no less!) That's WAY more machine than the transformer -- and it's actually usable. For $500, I could have picked up an even better computer.

      By buying the transformer, you p

      • by tom229 (1640685)
        The aspire one 722 is the same bulky-ulgy-going-to-be-virus-ridden-and-god-awful-slow type of device she was trying to get away from. I don't know where you got a new one for $230 as they are on amazon [amazon.com] for around $420 (the same price we paid for the transformer). Also, I don't typically like to purchase things blind so it would have to be available through a local retailer so I could try it out.
        A quick look at the specs show that it's twice as heavy as the TF300T, nearly 3 times the cubic volume, and doesn'
        • by narcc (412956)

          I don't know what to tell you, that's what I paid for it last December. Maybe you need to learn how to shop around?

          the same bulky-ulgy-going-to-be-virus-ridden-and-god-awful-slow type of device

          It's neither bulky (it's smaller than most laptops) nor slow, nor virus ridden.

          The tablet, on the other hand, is slower, has less RAM, can't run common software, and requires an expensive keyboard add-on. In short, it has FAR less utility AND is more expensive!

          The point remains, however, that $500 is more than enou

          • by tom229 (1640685)

            A quick look at the specs show that it's twice as heavy as the TF300T, nearly 3 times the cubic volume, and doesn't transform into a convenient tablet form for things like couch browsing.

            Simply re-stating your point in different ways while ignoring mine is not a good way to have an argument. This will be my last response.

            • by narcc (412956)

              What was your point? That buying an overpriced and under-powered computer is better than buying a more powerful computer at a lower pirce?

              Sounds stupid to me. I'm really sorry that that woman had only you to turn to for advice.

              Oh, I didn't ignore your post. Did you mean to respond to someone else?

    • I agree, for the majority of home use, a tablet will replace laptops and desktops.

      A tablet is less expensive, more portable, and has a relatively lightweight OS. The smaller size combined with a camera that can be used as a simple scanner allows for a lot of added flexibility even for some business uses.

      The biggest downfall is the lack of a physical keyboard. While this only has a minimal impact on people that are browsing content, it is a severe limitation on people that need to type a lot. (especially peo

      • I also brought a Transformer to replace my old laptop. Guess what, the TF-300 has a full size USB, and thus, can support a real mouse and keyboard. It also has an HDMI output for your real monitor.

        The form-factor is excellent, the keyboard is well designed and feel right (it's easier to use than my old 14" laptop, and doesn't even supports my language - for english speakers it should be a breeze), it's way lighter than a normal laptop, and the battery lasts for an entire day. A desktop is better, but most l

  • by bloodhawk (813939) on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:35PM (#43009597)
    HP's problem is not the OS (though that might not be helping), it is there damn ugly designs, crapware and bloatware that every device comes configured with making even the most expensive items feel like you are using a device from 10 years ago. It won't matter what direction they pick till they fix there core problem of not making machines for usability and performance.
    • According to virtually all reviewers, the Slate 7 actually addresses the issue of "ugly designs". It is, in my opinion, a good looking tablet.

  • Hewlett-Packard seems more determined than ever to flee the Windows reservation ...

    Maybe so, but they don't want to get too far away.

    "The new HP ENVY x2 PC gives you the power of two devices in one. A Windows 8 notebook with a bright, vivid HD Touch display. And a tablet that slides off for those times when you want to carry even less."
    http://www8.hp.com/us/en/ad/envy-x2/overview.html?jumpid=hpr_r1002_usen_link1 [hp.com]

  • by steveha (103154) on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:47PM (#43009695) Homepage

    SemiAccurate reported that HP was very annoyed by the Microsoft Surface, was dropping any plans for "WART" devices ("Windows on ARM"), and would embrace Android.

    http://semiaccurate.com/2012/06/29/hp-said-to-dump-microsoft-over-surface/ [semiaccurate.com]

  • by erroneus (253617) on Monday February 25, 2013 @06:55PM (#43009773) Homepage

    People want to keep using their computers, at the very least, in the way they have grown accustomed. Microsoft has a winner in the present day Windows 7. (Hilarious that I would even say that, but I did.) The last thing Microsoft should do right now is attempt to take that away from its customers and yet that's clearly Microsoft's aim.

    People don't want change. They don't want it forced on them and yet if they want a new computer, guess what is most likely to come on it? And most of those people don't have the skill to put Windows 7 on it so they are pretty much stuck with whatever comes with it. So increasingly, they are resisting the need to even buy new computers. This doesn't sit well with computer sellers.

    ASUS has shown the buying public is interested in tablets but they don't "need" Windows. The Google Nexus 7 has proven itself well. HP, a starving PC maker just wants a piece of that action. How long before Dell does the same? I know Dell has played in that field already... they inexplicably [my opinion] pulled out. Every attempt at supporting Linux was half-hearted enough to make me believe they did it to "prove" that Linux is not a viable alternative to Windows. Just a theory...

    But Microsoft stopped caring long ago about what people want and what they don't want. They have demonstrated their contempt for the public numerous times. People have somewhere else to go now... and we are seeing them go.

    • by jader3rd (2222716)

      People don't want change.

      Exactly. Which is my most people will never touch cell phones, let along smart phone, and will keep happily using their landlines. They also hate change so much that they know that a computer will certainly never replace their typewriter. And ARM based tablets are so much change from everything they previously knew they, that not a single person would ever want one.

      • by clemdoc (624639)
        Cell phone vs. landline is a comparison of completely different things (ever tried carrying around your landline phone to the supermarket and calling home to ask if there was anything else you should buy but might have forgotten to put on the shopping list?) whereas a new computer is just that: A new version of something you already have.
        And I think that indeed most (non-technical) people just want to keep using their computer the way they did without having to learn new stuff.
    • by SEE (7681) on Monday February 25, 2013 @08:21PM (#43010493) Homepage

      It's not that people reject change. It's that Windows 8 on phones/tablets/netbooks is the equivalent of cramming a lobotomized MVS onto the original 8088-based IBM PC, while Windows 8 on PCs is like making a port of COMMAND.COM the shell on MVS.

    • by wvmarle (1070040)

      Well, as other repliers pointed out to you, people are not totally reluctant to change - if it adds something to the experience, if it is something totally different, allowing to do things they could not do before.

      And another thing that should be added: change is OK if the new thing works at least as easy as the previous version. Example: people happily switch from WinXP to Win7, but not Win8. They also happily pick up a smart phone, as both Android and iOS operate very easily and mostly quite intuitively.

      O

      • by erroneus (253617)

        My point stands.

        If people are FORCED into change, they are likely to seek out alternatives to the offerings of the party which is forcing the change. In this case, Windows 8 is such a significant change, coupled with the general dissatisfaction of Windows users, they are not prepared to continue on with the [new] status quo when other alternatives appear to be viable.

        Prior to Android, there were no serious contenders and so Microsoft got away with adding, changing and deleting things which annoyed and upse

    • by jurco (2851147)

      ...if they want a new computer, guess what is most likely to come on it?

      My roommate Phill.

  • Well, MS bought into Dell, presumably to secure them as the biggest MS platform. Who's next, HP, Lenovo? Hope Balmer has enough cash...

  • "This isn't the first time in recent memory that HP's opted for a Google product over one offered by longtime partner Microsoft." - so it's not really news then is it?
    In other front-page news, I drove to work today. Yesterday I also drove to work then drove home.

  • Microsoft is very slow to adjust to market pressures which may become it's undoing. The world is networked now. An OS has become largely irrelevant while the browser has become the new OS.

    People no longer buy an eternal license of Windows anymore. Besides that model never made sense due to continuous Windows updates. Also new PC's tend to be sold with an OEM license and only savvy PC users know how to get a box without the Microsoft tax.

    Adobe got it right with their rental of their latest software suite. Pr

    • Windows presents MS with a conundrum.

      In the case of Adobe, their market was, mostly saturated. Switching to a rental model doesn't do much to erode future revenue opportunity since the unwilling parties probably were already not buying new copies, and Adobe really doesn't have that much of a vested interest beyond the explicit revenue on the offering.

      MS does have a wider vested interest in Windows though. They want to monetize facilitating and curating an application ecosystem and services like skydrive.

  • This is an 'all of the above' strategy. Assuming HP's entries into the market are respectable in the respective fields (which at least the Slate 7 does not seem to be), then no matter the 'winner' HP is equipped to support it.

    • From here
      http://h20435.www2.hp.com/t5/The-Next-Bench-Blog/HP-Slate-This-is-the-Droid-You-Were-Looking-For/ba-p/80911 [hp.com]

      As a result, HPâ(TM)s plan includes a three-tiered approach for the tablet market. Torres adds, âoeWeâ(TM)re looking at mobility in the enterprise commercial tier, where the ElitePad 900 is already getting traction in the marketplace. The Slate is coming from the consumer line, which is really about delivering a great entertainment experience. We also want to create a third tier for premium consumer products â" a Bring-Your-Own solution for the SMB crowd. Think of a device built with a âwork hard, play hardâ(TM) attitude.âoe

      The ElitePad 900 is a $649 Windows 8 tablet with 1280 x 800 screen (same resolution as my much cheaper android tablet actually). The inbetween tablet doesn't exist yet. However now there is some context it becomes a little clearer why the slate 7 is a bit so so.

      In my opinion HP are trying to bait and switch. The Android tablet is supposed to be the poor mans option, your not a poor man are yo

  • People have been fleeing HP for years.
  • HP, Dell, and other OEMs need to realize that they haven't failed necessarily because of Windows, but because they make subpar hardware and continue to make subpar hardware on the consumer level. This might be fine in the enterprise field where companies want things to be cheap and to just work, but the consumer market has changed, people want quality. Apple has been very good at that, and it took them years to build this image of quality...HP can't just crap our some piece of plastic with Windows and Andro
    • by polyp2000 (444682)

      I have two HP Laptops an old core 2 duo c700 and a couple years old i3 G62 . Both are still going strong - both great Linux machines. The c700 amazes me how it can still hold its own against my newer machine its a bit battered through plenty of usage. The G62 i have upgraded with additional memory and second SSD drive (in the optical bay) - its my main work machine and goes with me everywhere. While both these laptops were at the budget end of the spectrum when i bought them I feel that for the money i pai

  • M$ don't give a shit. Android tax. They still make a dollar off of it.
  • whats next, calling HP "fleeing the Microsoft Plantation for the underground railroad of Android" ?

  • When MS put out Vista and no one wanted it, we all clung on to XP then jumped on Win 7 soon as it came out. Now we have a 3rd party (Tablets) to turn to, by the time Win 9 comes out and things are put back right no one will care. Because of Win 8, the post PC era got a strong kick start from the very people who helped create it.
  • Businesses have boat-loads of lagacy, proprietary software that will keep them tied to Winblows for the forseeable future. Consumers have no such hang-ups, and are starting to realize that iPad, Kindle Fire or the innumerable Android-based alternatives can meet their web surfing, Facebook, email, media consumption, gaming, etc. needs, at a lower cost and with much greater portability. We're a couple of software updates away from a tablet that is a true, viable replacement for a Windows PC. This is the futur
  • This is hardly surprising, Microsoft really pissed off the OEMs by producing their own hardware (which they usually do very poorly, i.e. Kin) in this space. Sure a re-branded keyboard or mouse here or there is no big deal but when they go out and try replacing the entire ecosystem, they HAD to know there was going to be backlash.

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