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ICANN's Trademark Clearinghouse Launching Today 49

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the no-domain-for-you dept.
itwbennett writes "If you want to protect your brand before ICANN rolls out the new gTLDs (generic top-level domains), here's your chance. The clearinghouse will allow trademark owners to register their marks for an annual fee of between $95 and $150. The clearinghouse 'doesn't necessarily prevent trademark infringement or cybersquatting, but it does help trademark owners and brand owners somewhat in mitigating the damage that might occur,' said Keith Kupferschmid, general counsel and vice president of IP policy and enforcement for the Software and Information Industry Association (SIIA). 'We've been telling brand owners it's not that expensive to protect themselves and they ought to do it.'" All of the new TLD registrars will be required to check the trademark clearinghouse before issuing domains, preemptively squashing trademark disputes.
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ICANN's Trademark Clearinghouse Launching Today

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  • by zedrdave (1978512) on Tuesday March 26, 2013 @04:15AM (#43279359)
    For an extra $100, ICANN will send you your TLD VIP package that includes instructions on how to get on the faster VIP internets and make your domain load up spontaneously on people's browser when they utter your brand's name.
  • Money (Score:5, Insightful)

    by PGC (880972) on Tuesday March 26, 2013 @04:16AM (#43279363)
    Give us your moneys to put your name on a list. Not that we will actually do something with it, but it will give you a nice and fuzzy feeling.
    • by jittles (1613415)
      See I read the quote from the guy as "Giving Guido $100 might keep your business safe. Bad things can happen in this neighborhood. $100 isn't that much money."
  • by girlinatrainingbra (2738457) on Tuesday March 26, 2013 @04:37AM (#43279393)
    re : before ICANN roles out the new gTLDs (generic top-level domains), [emphasis mine]
    .
    You could say:
    before ICANN rolls out the new gTLDs

    or, you could say:

    before ICANN doles out the new gTLDs

    but srsly, you cannot say:

    before ICANN roles out the new gTLDs

    "Rolls out" and "doles out" have different implications, but they would at least make some sense. Hello, /., we need an editor on aisle 5, please send an editor to aisle 5 now, we've got a grammar spill. Bring the sawdust... ;>)

  • You wouldn't want it to be infringed upon would you?
  • Who gets .apple? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by magic maverick (2615475) on Tuesday March 26, 2013 @04:43AM (#43279409) Homepage Journal

    Who gets .mcdonalds? Who gets .burgerking ("The burgers are better at Hungry Jack's")

    And I could repeat trademarks that apply in different geographical areas, and in different business areas. I sell computer services under the name Coca Cola, does that mean I can prevent a global beverage company from squatting on .cocacola?

    In other words, as previously mentioned, this whole this is a scam.

  • scam (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Tom (822) on Tuesday March 26, 2013 @05:05AM (#43279469) Homepage Journal

    Seriously? This is so close to various scams that you need a microscope to spot the difference.

    Not to mention that it borders on a protection racket. "Nice trademark you have there. Would be a shame if anything happened to it..."

    ICANN needs to be replaced.

  • In other words, ICANN is still just looking for more of your money. That is all they have cared about for many years now. They haven't cared for some time what impact their decisions have on people who use the internet, provided it brings more money to them.
  • I pay the USPTO for trademark registration, and that covers everything.
  • by carou (88501) on Tuesday March 26, 2013 @06:38AM (#43279683) Homepage Journal

    The only use I can see for new TLD is to distinguish between different possible uses of the same name. e.g. consider how many web sites now have $(thing)-movie.com or $(thing)-band.com : if .movie and .band were TLDs, that's actually providing some benefit. But these are generic words, not trademarks. They're only useful if a registrar sells subdomains at a reasonable price, and the TLD will live or die depending on whether it can get a foothold in the market. This is a good thing.

    I just don't see a case for corporations buying their own TLD. Is there a substantial usability or branding difference between www.disney and disney.com? Everybody will just type "disney" into the address bar anyway, it will find the right site even if it has to go via google...

    • by swillden (191260)

      I just don't see a case for corporations buying their own TLD. Is there a substantial usability or branding difference between www.disney and disney.com? Everybody will just type "disney" into the address bar anyway, it will find the right site even if it has to go via google...

      Sure it will, after multiple DNS queries, then a query to Google, then a user click. If the TLD resolves directly to the company's web site, users will get there faster. Sites that load pretty slowly anyway won't benefit much, but those that care about page load times can see significant benefits.

      There are other reasons, I'm sure, but there's one, anyway. I'm guessing Google's registration of the "google" TLD is to accomplish exactly that (note: I work for Google but don't know anything about why Google h

  • So owners or registered trademarks have to register them again? To a company that says "It won't protect the marks from being used, just help when you sue". Isn't that why you registered the trademark with the government to begin with?

  • by Turminder Xuss (2726733) on Tuesday March 26, 2013 @07:02AM (#43279769)
    All those complaining about the cost of pre-emptive action that could prevent an infringement suit are welcome to compare it to the first billable hour of lawyers engaged in emptive action.
  • In other words ICANN is creating a whole host of phishing/identity problems with a money making TLD scheme which help nobody except phishers and their bottom line...

    (...drumroll...)

    Now they seriously have the nerve to seek mitigation against blatently predictable abuse of TLD insanity of their own making by soliciting even more money in extortion payments to safeguard their trademarks. WTF

    I wish operators in the root zone list would grow a fucking spine and revolt against these loosers. ICANN needs to be

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