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The Internet

ICANN Approves First Set of New gTLDs 106

Posted by timothy
from the land-office-business dept.
hypnosec writes "ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) has approved the first set of global Top Level Domains (gTLDs) and surprisingly all four are non-English words including . ("Web" in Arabic); . ("Game" in Chinese); . ("Online" in Russian); and . ("Web site" in Russian). Approval of four non-English words can be considered as a milestone and this approval marks "the first time that people will be able to access and type in a website address for generic Top-Level Domains in their native language.""
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ICANN Approves First Set of New gTLDs

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  • why no .microsoft? I think the company deserves to have it.
    • by ackthpt (218170)

      why no .microsoft? I think the company deserves to have it.

      They're plateauing. The decline is next. Based upon what I'm deluged with on Facebook these days, you're likely to see .lolcat before you see .microsoft.

      • We've established the Electronic Frontier Foundation at the edge of Cyberspace to reduce to dark ages after the fall of Microsoft from 30,000 years to a mere 1,000. Wait, wrong Foundation and wrong Empire.

      • by g0bshiTe (596213)
        "deluged with on Facebook" using FB and considering it getting deluged by it you must be new to the intarwebs.

        Be sure to check out 4chan, tubgirl and goatse.

        The last two will change your life!
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Who said no microsoft? They have applied for 11 gTLDs, 9 of which have passed, including .microsoft.

  • by jez9999 (618189) on Thursday July 18, 2013 @12:56PM (#44319095) Homepage Journal

    surprisingly all four are non-English words including . ("Web" in Arabic); . ("Game" in Chinese); . ("Online" in Russian); and . ("Web site" in Russian).

    That's an amazing co-incidence that all those languages use a mere full stop to mean different things!

    • by MightyYar (622222)

      Since Slashdot sees fit to block those languages, I think I'll take their cue and add Arabic, Russian, and Chinese language urls to my spam filter :)

      • I

        "Since Slashdot sees fit to block those languages, I think I'll take their cue and add Arabic, Russian, and Chinese language urls to my spam filter :)"

        It isn't just "those languages" that /. blocks. Their character support has changed over time... but I don't know of ANY time during which it wasn't fundamentally broken.

        • by markhb (11721)

          The more broken something is on Slashdot, the greater the probability that it's exercising code that was actually written by CmdrTaco.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Since Slashdot sees fit to block those languages, I think I'll take their cue and add Arabic, Russian, and Chinese language urls to my spam filter :)

        Won't adding "." to your URL filter block everything?

      • by Krojack (575051)

        Wait, you're just NOW considering adding Chinese and Russian languages to your spam filters?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 18, 2013 @01:18PM (#44319387)

      How deliciously appropriate. Slashcode's truly embarrassingly archaic handling of Unicode finally comes front and center on the front page.

      How hard is it to get Unicode support in this code? Seriously, it's freaking blogging software! It's not like you're doing byte-dependent low-level math requiring the exact codepoints of ASCII characters! You're just delivering text over HTTP! What is WRONG with you? Do you guys seriously want to show that as an example of "News for Nerds", or have you seriously finally killed off that byline once and for all because you can't understand something as simple as Unicode?

      • by Anonymous Coward

        I had a discussion with CmdrTaco about this, and his excuse is simply his own incompetence. According to him, it is "impossible" to prevent users from inputting characters that could mess up the layout.
        Of course, being an actual programmer, I know this is bullshit, and it's only him.

        Yes, Unicode has potentially bad characters like direction reversal and so on. But only in certain designated blocks. That's why you use a WHITE LIST, and only allow blocks that don't contain such characters. And for the very fi

        • And for the very first block you use the same rules as for Latin-1/ASCII too, which by the way ALSO has potentially really bad characters like all below 0x20!

          All of them? Including 0x0a?

      • by cayenne8 (626475)

        How hard is it to get Unicode support in this code?

        Well, what's the real impetus?

        I mean, this is a US centric site, with US centric post and is in English...not much of a need to go to the apparent trouble to change the existing system to Unicode.

        • by Chris Mattern (191822) on Thursday July 18, 2013 @03:00PM (#44320557)

          Well, what's the real impetus?

          Does having a front-page article shit all over itself because the non-ASCII characters that are the entire point of the article decide not to render count?

        • by richlv (778496)

          whenever somebody on slashdot posts about it being usa-centric site, i see an image of an overweight white guy in a trailerpark :)
          i know, i know, it's not true. but that's what we learn from your movies.

          (coincidentally, i'm in florida right now. not many trailerparks, but some drivers and cars in western everglades are interesting :) )

      • by RyoShin (610051) <tukaro.gmail@com> on Thursday July 18, 2013 @04:52PM (#44321685) Homepage Journal

        Slashdot will never fix their unicode issues. Or their lack of editors who edit. Or their sensationalist and, sometimes, completely wrong summaries. All of that costs time/money and, if they even still cared about value over money while owned by GeekNet, they certainly don't now that they're owned by Dice.

        IMHO, Slashdot is dead as a proper "nerd news" site, and has been for some time. Unfortunately, I've yet to find a site (nerd or otherwise) that has the same comment moderation system (which is still the best one, in my opinion, though not without its flaws) and a large, informative/funny/insightful community. Slashdot still enjoys popularity thanks to its community, which is always more worthwhile than the summaries, which almost seems like a catch-22 setup. At least, it's the only reason I'm still here.

        Perhaps it would be worthwhile for the comments for this story to be hijacked and used to suggest good alternatives to /.?

        • by Archon-X (264195)

          Best I have found is news.ycombinator.com [ycombinator.com]. It's like slashdot was 10 years ago. It's got a slight hipster/startup twist to it, but it sure beats wading through reddit.

      • by tlhIngan (30335)

        How deliciously appropriate. Slashcode's truly embarrassingly archaic handling of Unicode finally comes front and center on the front page.

        How hard is it to get Unicode support in this code? Seriously, it's freaking blogging software! It's not like you're doing byte-dependent low-level math requiring the exact codepoints of ASCII characters! You're just delivering text over HTTP! What is WRONG with you? Do you guys seriously want to show that as an example of "News for Nerds", or have you seriously finally

        • by Dahan (130247)
          How is it a "huge problem"? ASCII has a number of control characters too. A whitelist is a great idea, but why is the whitelist so restrictive? Just grab a copy of the current Unicode Data [unicode.org] file and whitelist all current non-control characters. And if you're concerned that Zalgo [stackoverflow.com] might come, I suppose you could omit any non-spacing chars from the whitelist without people complaining too much (though perhaps it'd be good to include the ones that are actual letters in various Indic scripts).
          • by tlhIngan (30335)

            How is it a "huge problem"? ASCII has a number of control characters too. A whitelist is a great idea, but why is the whitelist so restrictive? Just grab a copy of the current Unicode Data file and whitelist all current non-control characters. And if you're concerned that Zalgo might come, I suppose you could omit any non-spacing chars from the whitelist without people complaining too much (though perhaps it'd be good to include the ones that are actual letters in various Indic scripts).

            Actually, Zalgo did

    • As we cannot post unicode versions, here are the punycode [wikipedia.org] versions:

      .xn--ngbc5azd = International Domain Registry Pty. Ltd.'s Arabic for "Web or Network"
      .xn--80asehdb = Core Association's Russian for "Online"
      .xn--80aswg = Core Association's Russian for "Web site"
      .xn--unup4y = Spring Fields, LLC Chinese for "Game"

  • by SirGarlon (845873) on Thursday July 18, 2013 @01:07PM (#44319247)
    What's surprising about the fact that when ICANN started approving top-level domains that allow Unicode characters, that the first four were from languages that don't use the Latin alphabet? The only surprise to me is that two are Russian and one is Chinese, instead of the other way around.
    • Re:"Surprising?" (Score:5, Interesting)

      by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Thursday July 18, 2013 @01:12PM (#44319315) Journal

      The honest fellows at the Russian Business Network will need all the TLDs they can get to stay ahead of the blacklists...

      • How long before just having Cyrillic in your domain name is enough to get you blacklisted?

        • Given the nontrivial overlap(in many reasonably common fonts) between Cyrillic and Latin glyphs, and the accompanying opportunities for wacky domain spoofing, Not. Soon. Enough.

          All-Cyrillic domains(with the exception of the ones that you could construct purely from characters with serious overlap issues) aren't nearly as threatening; but, given that sprinkling in a few Cyrillic characters will let you construct visually identical(but completely different) URLs for a substantial number of Latin-character dom

    • by Yomers (863527)
      I'll be surprised if those Russian domains will ever be widely used - about 3 years ago Russia got .RF (but in cyrillic letters, so I can not properly write it here, it's xn--p1ai ), and yet I've seen only one legitimate website advertised on this tld, and it was advertisement of demolision works service crudely painted in an elevator.
  • by Sparticus789 (2625955) on Thursday July 18, 2013 @01:12PM (#44319311) Journal

    If the world wanted to have control over the internet naming schemes, they should have spent the time, money, and effort to INVENT the internet.

    'Murica!

  • by Anonymous Coward

    ... "the first time that people will be able to access and type in a website address for generic Top-Level Domains in their native language."

    I happen to be able to type in website addresses for generic Top-Level Domains in my native language and I do so every day, you insensitive clod!

  • Every domain under NSA surveillance should be required by law to register under the .nsa domain.

    • That's too obvious, so they opted for a "." behind ".com", ".org", ".ca", etc. and it's also hidden from view. Just try it, type www.google.ca. with the . at the end and it will resolve fine if it's monitored by the NSA.

      http://newgtlds.icann.org./en/announcements-and-media/announcement-15jul13-en

      See that . between org and /en ? Yep. Monitored.

      :--)

      • Some day it'll be remembered that DARPA was involved in the creation of the internet and people will talk about it like Sauron handing out rings.
        • 3 letter TLD's for the Tolkien fans under the sky.
          XXX for the porn lords in their halls of gold.

          Just had to do it.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Please ICANN, please. You are ruining what a TLD was supposed to be.
    Worse, these are top-level TLDs, stop polluting the global space with shitty word-grab TLDs.

    If people want TLDs for their crap in their country, force them to use the country identifiers that were all made standard 50 gigayears ago.
    http://ru.crappy-word-grab-TLDs.whatever-crap-site.subdomains/crap-directories-with-nothing-in-them-because-you-paid-a-fortune-for-a-site-nobody-will-know-exists/thanks-obama.html
    Oh, also, flip the damn DNS alre

  • the first time that people will be able to access and type in a website address for generic Top-Level Domains in their native language.

    And the first time many people won't be able to access and type in a website address just because it's written in a language their OS's input methods can't reasonably handle.

    (yeah, yeah, I know all those companies will get a .com next to their localized gTLD name that everybody will use instead; this is just a moneygrab after all).

  • by ArcadeMan (2766669) on Thursday July 18, 2013 @01:38PM (#44319579)

    We should have ditched the com, net and org and just force everyone to use TLDs according to their countries. Sites like www.ebay.com would be www.ebay.us, etc.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      And who would enforce it? The registrars who make millions with the same domainname in very f***** country + all gTLD's? And on what basis? "Any Company shall only register in their home-country"? Sure, then we gonna get SONY US Corp, SONY UK Corp, SONY Deutschland AG, etc.... The Domain system was broken long before most slashdotters where born, this is not gonna be fixed, there's simply too much money to be made...

    • We should have ditched the com, net and org and just force everyone to use TLDs according to their countries. Sites like www.ebay.com would be www.ebay.us, etc.

      Corporations are people, remember? And the important ones that buy and sell legislatures like bars of soap are all multinational corporations. They don't have countries.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Except, of course, that many bodies are multi-/inter-/trans-national. Is it reasonable to require SpecialtyManufacturer.uk which ships to the U.S. and Canada to register SpecialtyManufacturer.us and SpecialtyManufacturer.cn just to have a better standing with search engines and "look" more American-/Canadian-friendly? Where would you move UN.org?

      But then again, why partition based on nationality? Why not on something more relevant, like language? We could then just have one SpecialtyManufacturer.en. That ge

    • We should have ditched the com, net and org and just force everyone to use TLDs according to their countries. Sites like www.ebay.com would be www.ebay.us, etc.

      How is that any different? Companies and people are becoming increasingly more international these days. Something more useful would be function, e.g. .store, .blog, .person, etc. The only reason we have the country codes is that each country wanted to control its own primary, for whatever reason. It's time to get national borders out of the internet.

    • What's so great about countries?

  • by water-and-sewer (612923) on Thursday July 18, 2013 @01:39PM (#44319589) Homepage

    So, if unicode characters are now a legitimate part of website names, I'd like to register a new domain:

    http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/1f4a9/index.htm [fileformat.info]

    Imagine all the fun I could have with it: microsoft.pile-of-poo, oracle.pile-of-poo, mostgovernmentrepresentatives.pile-of-poo and so on. It would make blogging so much more satisfying. Who wants to be a dot-com anymore? So 90s. Be poop instead!

    • I actually think that would be pretty awesome.
    • That deserves to be a meme.

      Though perhaps only a meme on /b/...

    • The biggest hindrance to adoption is that major browsers, along with JavaScript itself, handle strings in UCS-2 and tend to mishandle codepoints above 0xFFFF. Hopefully this will push browser makers and web designers to handle UTF-16 surrogate pairs properly.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      I'm afraid you can't have it: http://unicode.org/cldr/utility/character.jsp?a=1F4A9 shows the character as "idna2008 disallowed", which is to say it is not accepted for use in domain names.

  • 1. Reserve the .isanasshole TLD
    2. Hollywood actors pay huge amounts so nobody can register "myname.isanasshole"
    3. Profits!

    • by nullchar (446050)

      These are all uncontested applications (except for .sucks) and will all be new gTLDs within the next year or so:

      .gripe
      .fail
      .sucks
      .wtf

      (Listed in order of application prioritization by ICANN.)

  • by iCEBaLM (34905) <icebalm@NOsPam.icebalm.com> on Thursday July 18, 2013 @01:49PM (#44319689)

    "the first time that people will be able to access and type in a website address for generic Top-Level Domains in their native language."

    My native language is english, I've been able to do this for a long time.

  • seriously, why limit them at all? surely it'd make tons of money and likely not add to much more effort to maintain.
  • Anyone sending emails from these new TLD's get a nasty surprise due to years and years of email regexes bouncing their email as coming from a bad address.

  • by J'raxis (248192) on Thursday July 18, 2013 @04:39PM (#44321561) Homepage

    Nice article summary. Still don't support that 1998 technology called "UTF-8," do ya, Slashdot?

  • ... as we increasingly see the nationalistic silos being re-erected. Don't go '.com', go '.ca' to show your patriotism to Canada. Only a matter of time before we get '.pq' for Province of Quebec (with only websites in French allowed and the word 'pasta' forbidden).

"Card readers? We don't need no stinking card readers." -- Peter da Silva (at the National Academy of Sciencies, 1965, in a particularly vivid fantasy)

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