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Majority of Enterprise Customers Finally 'Migrating Away From Windows XP' 246

Posted by Soulskill
from the except-those-who-can't-stand-to-give-up-IE6 dept.
New submitter TinTops writes "Speaking in a keynote at Intel's Developer Forum, Microsoft's vice president of marketing, Tami Reller, said the firm has 'now seen about three quarters of Windows enterprises moving to modern desktops' from Windows XP, with the last leg of Windows XP migrations being spurred by the imminent availability of Windows 8.1. However, Reller did not offer a breakdown of the enterprise uptake of Windows 8 compared to Windows 7, both of which are counted by Microsoft as modern desktops."
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Majority of Enterprise Customers Finally 'Migrating Away From Windows XP'

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  • Migration (Score:4, Funny)

    by puddingebola (2036796) on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:20PM (#44845165) Journal
    Maybe they are migrating to Canada. I hear that it is a nice country.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by ackthpt (218170)

      Maybe they are migrating to Canada. I hear that it is a nice country.

      Well, two from the Enterprise came to the US from Canada (Kirk & Scotty) The Ambassador Bridge goes two ways, eh!

      • by Darinbob (1142669)

        Kirk is from Iowa!

  • by rumpledoll (716472) <rumpledoll@covad . n et> on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:21PM (#44845175)
    I suspect well north of 90%. Anyone know a real number for this?
    • by RatBastard (949) on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:23PM (#44845181) Homepage

      My office is slowly migrating to 7. We have no plans to go with Windows 8 on the desktop.

    • by msobkow (48369) on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:24PM (#44845193) Homepage Journal

      A real number? On Slashdot?

      Let me guess: You actually read the article, too.

      But I've not run into a single Windows 8 desktop at any business site I've ever worked for or visited, so I suspect your number is lowballing it.

      • by Sir_Sri (199544)

        I've seen a few, mostly in the testing sense, or for anyone who makes consumer software as a business, and they need to know how to work with 8.

        But ya, I'm scrambling to get a bunch of windows 7 PC's in the next week or two for a LOT of small business customers in case 8.1 makes windows 7 unavailable. Unfortunately windows 8.1 is not actually a meaningful improvement on windows 8.

        • by rtb61 (674572)

          Notice how the lies continue to this day about Vista and now Windows 8. Balmer basically spending M$'s money to make himself not quite look like the Uncle Fester of software that he is. No mention that the substantive XP upgrade represents a jump over Vista and to windows 7, just to get it in before they are forced to use windows 8 by windows 7 being made unavailable. Now add to this no mention of servers, just talk about desktops. I wonder how many XP equivalent servers are becoming Linux servers and all

      • by ackthpt (218170)

        A real number? On Slashdot?

        Let me guess: You actually read the article, too.

        But I've not run into a single Windows 8 desktop at any business site I've ever worked for or visited, so I suspect your number is lowballing it.

        We buy Windows 8 machines, then image Windows 7 over top.

    • by fishnuts (414425) <fishnuts@arpa.org> on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:40PM (#44845285) Homepage

      As an IT manager who oversees deployment and maintenance of about 60 desktops and laptops, some of which are shared among multiple employees, consistency in OS availability for the end user is key. We upgrade one or two machines per month, and we started using Windows 7 three years ago, so about 15 systems still run XP. We're not touching 8.1 until there are no more XP systems on our network, AND people show interest in actually using 8.1, AND at least one service pack has been released to address outstanding issues since its public release, AND we discover a way to disable the "Tiles" start screen. Supporting systems with two different desktop interfaces is a serious pain in the ass, especially for non-technical users. So far, only two people have shown interest in using Windows 8 (techie geek types), and the vast majority of our employees are averse to changing their OS at all.

      I've had to customize Windows 7 a bit to make it "comfortable" for the lowest common denominator: Long-time XP/2000 users.

      • by dnaumov (453672)

        As an IT manager who oversees deployment and maintenance of about 60 desktops and laptops, some of which are shared among multiple employees, consistency in OS availability for the end user is key. We upgrade one or two machines per month, and we started using Windows 7 three years ago, so about 15 systems still run XP. We're not touching 8.1 until there are no more XP systems on our network, AND people show interest in actually using 8.1, AND at least one service pack has been released to address outstanding issues since its public release, AND we discover a way to disable the "Tiles" start screen.

        You will be waiting a very long time then, considering 8.1 is essentially the service pack for 8. The concept of a "service pack" is dead, Microsoft has long planned moving to rolling releases a la MacOS X.

      • by vux984 (928602) on Friday September 13, 2013 @08:10PM (#44845767)

        AND at least one service pack has been released to address outstanding issues since its public release,

        Wouldn't you consider 8.1 as a service pack to 8.0 ?

        AND we discover a way to disable the "Tiles" start screen

        The 3rd party add-ons do that well enough today. If you haven't "discovered" them yet, you haven't been looking. But honestly, by the time your company is likely to move to consider moving past 7, maybe you'll want to reconsider that.

        2-3 years from now, I figure the new start screen will have largely been adopted as mainstream (at least if Microsoft doesn't abandon it in favor of a whole new UI next year...) and by then using it at work might be acceptable for the vast majority of employees, with minimal training.

        Sure you'll have a few luddites who still get angry if the desktop doesn't look like what they used in 1998 but they can either adapt or be replaced.

        Not that I'm suggesting rolling out the start screen now... I'm just saying make that decision a few years out. When XP launched everybody in business always set the classic theme to make it look more like Windows 2000. by 2005 that practice was long dead... people all had XP at home, and had acclimatized to the new start menu.

        I think we'll see that repeat again with the start screen, although it may take a bit longer. since its a lot more different and computers last longer now.

        And again... it all depends on what microsoft does... sitcks with it and further improves it... or if they throw it under the bus with Zune and Silverlight... :)

        • by tftp (111690) on Friday September 13, 2013 @09:27PM (#44846175) Homepage

          The 3rd party add-ons do that well enough today. If you haven't "discovered" them yet, you haven't been looking.

          Those 3rd party add-ons are not a good option for a business. Microsoft can break the functionality at any time - and they did it once already, with 8.1.

          If they do it again, what will you do when on some fine Wednesday 100 workers come to their computers, wiggle the mouse, and they see ... what will they see? They never saw it before. Would be probably a thousand tiles. They will call the IT. The telephones at IT melt down, and the IT director commits seppuku with a dull byte. There is no option to "wait a couple weeks until the Start8 people figure out what is broken *this time*." The option to roll back the updates is also not very easy (if you need it, you aren't set up for approved deployment of patches.)

          2-3 years from now, I figure the new start screen will have largely been adopted as mainstream

          It won't be because it is not an improvement, it's a regress to Windows 3.0. Full-screen, single window Program Manager.

          • by BUL2294 (1081735) on Saturday September 14, 2013 @12:02AM (#44846737)
            Wrong... Windows 3.0 Program Manager supported multiple, overlapping windows. Win8 is a regression to Windows 1.0x, which did not support overlapping windows--only maximized & tiled. We didn't go back to 1990-era capabilities (3.0), but back to 1985-era capabilities. Is there a hack that will allow me to run the tiles in 4-color CGA mode???

            Where Win8's crappy Metro tile desktop program loading thingy falls apart is when you have multiple shortcuts that have the same name. How does that happen? Simple: "Uninstall". Not "Uninstall (program"), but "Uninstall". With the Start Menu, "Uninstall" is under the folder of the program (or even in the Win3.x Program Manager Group). No such info on Win8's StartClusterfuck...
          • by vux984 (928602)

            Those 3rd party add-ons are not a good option for a business. Microsoft can break the functionality at any time - and they did it once already, with 8.1.

            True of all 3rd party software. All the time.

            Or can you really not think of a single microsoft patch or service pack that broke some line-of-business application, that needed a vendor supplied fix? Because its a pretty regular occurence.

            It won't be because it is not an improvement, it's a regress to Windows 3.0. Full-screen, single window Program Manager.

            N

            • by tftp (111690) on Saturday September 14, 2013 @12:44AM (#44846909) Homepage

              True of all 3rd party software. All the time.

              Breakage of a random application that dared to use a deprecated API call that suddenly suffered a regression (and wasn't tested, since it's deprecated) does occur. But it's unintentional, and MS may eventually fix the problem. They have no particular reason to protect a problem.

              However Metro was a problem that was intentionally created and maintained and protected. Working around that problem is "unwelcome." I don't know how open is the API that the software is using, but as I suspect it is neither very open nor very much designed for 3rd parties. If it's undocumented, here be dragons.

              In essence, software like Start8 is actively fighting Microsoft. And Microsoft fights back. What business would want to stand on that battlefield and risk being obliterated by one side or the other?

              No, its becoming a tiling window manager, something several linux users run on their own systems by choice and swear by it.

              Tiling window managers fit the workflow of precious few users. I don't use it myself (actively hate!) and I don't know anyone who would use one or want one. Many years ago I knew one geek; he was only using console I/O and vi. Perhaps it would work for him. But it's sheer insanity to throw a highly specialized piece of software at unsuspecting people who - for their whole life of computing - have never even seen a tiling WM. The nature of "general computing" suggests that we run different applications, and they have different needs. Tiling WM is OK if you and your software are very logical and very systematic. Most people are nothing of the sort. They just drag their windows around until they get what they want. They do not "program" their WM, they wing it.

              And I think most of microsofts defaults for the start screen are stupid on a desktop... but that's all stuff that easily fixable with group policy.

              Indeed, plenty of SO/HO users are ready to whip up a few GPOs and deploy them through their AD. That's what those poor souls live for - to fix Windows. Not to repair cars, and not to sell products, and not to bake pizza - but to code GPOs. Sure, this is not a problem at a large company. But it is a huge problem at a smaller company. Now you have to buy a new computer and call the support contractor right away because the computer is not usable "out of the box."

              • by vux984 (928602)

                Breakage of a random application

                Is called patch Tuesday? :)

                Meanwhile Click-to-run Outlook (which short of a VLA is the only way to get outlook) won't run Outlook Add ons without some serious arm twisting -- breaking a great many apps... from Google apps sync to CRM stuff.

                In essence, software like Start8 is actively fighting Microsoft.

                Microsoft has never been particularly safe for heavy shell modifications.

                If I were looking to deploy win8, and I wanted a start menu clone, I'd pick one that was merely a task

          • It won't be because it is not an improvement, it's a regress to Windows 3.0. Full-screen, single window Program Manager.

            People will adapt. Nothing stays forever in technology. It doesn't matter if it's an improvement or not - it's important to be able to change your workflow when necessary, otherwise you hang onto outdated methodologies.

            Being able to adapt to change is the most important thing in this industry. Standing still is not maintainable.

        • by LordLimecat (1103839) on Friday September 13, 2013 @11:38PM (#44846665)

          "Luddite" means someone opposed to progress because of lost jobs.

          People opposing the new tiles menu oppose regressions that impede work.

    • by ackthpt (218170)

      I suspect well north of 90%. Anyone know a real number for this?

      As the age of XP approaches infinity the percentage ever decreases, usually through attrition of old hardware replaced with new. That's simply going to happen no matter how closely bound some users are to their old XP machines. But as we are now well along with VMs and such, there's no real reason anyone who isn't absolutely determined can't continue to run it in an emulator or VM instance. The limiting factor, however, will be inability to run software, such as browsers, which become more resource hungr

      • by dbIII (701233)

        old hardware replaced with new

        I installed XP on new hardware last year. Some legacy software won't run on win7 and in some cases a VM is not a good option (eg. evil parallel port dongles - even USB dongle behaviour is flaky). As plotter drivers etc get updated there is less need for it but it's a very slow change.

    • I finally get upgraded at work to Windows 7 next Friday! Along with IE 8! Joy! I'm not kidding
  • by ScottCooperDotNet (929575) on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:28PM (#44845213)

    I don't know why any sane company would be "spurred by the imminent availability of Windows 8.1" to drop XP. It's much more about XP's end of support on April 8, 2014. We can't have soon-to-be-unpatched boxes and laptops on our network, although I'm sure some will be in hiding past that date (VMs, second systems, etc).

    • by plover (150551) on Friday September 13, 2013 @07:56PM (#44845707) Homepage Journal

      It's only about XP's end of support on April 8, 2014.

      FTFY.

      There are zero positive valid business benefits to upgrading to Windows 8+, some non-issues that are used for sales pitches by OS vendors, and several negatives.

      In the non-issue column, there are:

      • We have no need for any application changes that take "advantage" of any of the new features of the new OS.
      • We have no need for any GUI changes that take "advantage" of any of the new features of the new GUI.

      In the negative column, we have the following:

      • Vendor support. End-of-life is used only for extortion by the vendor. We'd be perfectly content if they continued to support XP. It's not as if those bits rotted away through age.
      • GUI changes that disturb people who have no need to learn a new GUI. In particular, I don't want to pay someone extra to waste their time learning a new GUI.
      • OS storage requirements that increase the footprint of the OS. I don't want to have to buy new hardware, disks, CPUs, RAM, or motherboards.
      • Increasingly complex management and distribution requirements. We solved all those problems already. Now I have to re-solve them for the new OS.
      • Their originally poor security model was made more complex without making it better. Again, my training and costs rise, with no ROI.
      • Cost. Not only do the new licenses cost, but the ever increasing doom of moving to a Microsoft-based SaaSTCRMFYOAAB (Software as a Service That Collects Rent Money From You On An Annual Basis.) I don't need to pay their cloud fees to do my work.

      Microsoft thrives on confusing people into to forgetting that an OS is nothing more than the kernel, and the rest of the crap is GUI and application stuff that should not belong in the hands of the OS vendor. Apple has mastered fostering that misunderstanding as well. It's obviously profitable for them, which means it costs us plenty.

      The worst part is that I've had our infrastructure people tell us the cost of deploying Linux is too high, for several of those same negative reasons above. Well, we would have had to do it exactly ONE time, and then we'd have been done. But no, here we are, staring down another Windows end-of-life deadline, getting ready to write them another check. Too bad we can't sue those people for malfeasance.

  • by jayhawk88 (160512) <jayhawk88@gmail.com> on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:31PM (#44845227)

    Windows 8.1. *eyeroll* They're going to 7 you morons, and they're going to stay there for another 15 years. Doesn't matter what you do to the Start Menu.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 13, 2013 @07:09PM (#44845455)

      XP being end of life next April was the spur where I work and I expect many other places too. And yeah we're going to 7, not even thinking about 8 except for some tablets.

    • by BitwiseX (300405) on Friday September 13, 2013 @07:20PM (#44845513)

      Windows 8.1. *eyeroll* They're going to 7 you morons, and they're going to stay there for another 15 years. Doesn't matter what you do to the Start Menu.

      Yeah, I read that, and thought BS as well. They're looking the wrong direction I think. Looking backwards at the curmudgeon that was Vista, that was (at least in my enterprise environment) completely skipped over. It was really a matter of earning back some trust.
      I understand that 8.1 is to 8 what SP2 was to XP (in theory) but I just can't see any advantage to using 8 in an enterprise environment.

      Not to mention, enterprise adoption is a SLOW process in a lot of cases. It's the same reason certain cars sell better on the used market than others. PROVEN reliability.

      (oh shit, did I just make a car anology... I really need to get off this site)

    • by jbolden (176878)

      The end of Windows 7 extended support is January 14, 2020. Microsoft is not going to make the same mistake of indefinitely extending this date by continuing sales indefinitely.

      • by girlintraining (1395911) on Friday September 13, 2013 @07:57PM (#44845713)

        The end of Windows 7 extended support is January 14, 2020. Microsoft is not going to make the same mistake of indefinitely extending this date by continuing sales indefinitely.

        They tried to kill XP. Repeatedly. They extended the deadline many times. They're going to do it again with Windows 7, because 8 is a steaming three coiled turd. Nobody asks when corporations are upgrading to Vista... because nobody is. How many corporations are looking at Windows 8? Next to none. Go ahead... find a job for a "Windows 7 to Windows 8 migration expert" on a job site for a Fortune 500 company. We'd all love to see the three positions in the entire world that are available for that job. -_-

        Please. Microsoft can try shoving stuff down their customer's throats... but all they'll do is get another XBone out of the deal. How's that working out for you, by the way, Ballmer? Polishing up the old resume I hear.

        • by yuhong (1378501)

          Fact: MS guarantees at least two years of mainstream support for the previous version after a new version of release.

        • Actually Windows 8 on the desktop is faster and more responsive than Windows 7.

          It's the Windows 8 UI that is the steaming turd.
          And the overall kernel improvements won't make much difference over 7 on our overpowered hardware anyway.

        • They tried to kill XP. Repeatedly. They extended the deadline many times. They're going to do it again with Windows 7, because 8 is a steaming three coiled turd. Nobody asks when corporations are upgrading to Vista... because nobody is. How many corporations are looking at Windows 8? Next to none.

          Some day, the anthropologists will look back at Microsoft's OS release strategy and at least credit them with their cunning. They've been using the "Facebook Model" of making changes for longer than Facebook's been around: Make a bunch of changes that you know everyone will hate, then apologize and back off a bit to something more acceptable, at least you get to keep a lot of the changes you made.

          Politicians have been doing this for hundreds of years too. Windows 8 is the current pinnacle of this two

        • by UnknownSoldier (67820) on Saturday September 14, 2013 @09:15AM (#44848477)

          I work for a fortune 50, yes 50, company.

          You are spot on with XP, Vista, and Win 7. There are quite a few legacy systems stuck on IE6 because of stupid SAP crap. We only recently upgraded those to IE7 !!! (Classic short-sightedness of selling your soul to MS and we are literally paying the devil his due for not having the wisdom to use open standard but I digress.)

          I'll be visiting HQ next week. I'll ask some of the admins what our Win8.1 plans (if any) are.

          On the back end some flavor of *nix is obviously used. Allways kind of surprised (and glad) to hear OpenBD pop-up when I least expect it. Rest of *nix boxes are usually Solaris with some sort of Blades.

          OSX is become more visible. We even have a few satellite offices running OSX exclusively. I've been converting a few developers to *augment* their Win 7 & 8 boxes over to OSX. With the clusterfuck of Win8 it has been an easy "sell". Most people don't realize just how inconsistent and schizophrensic MS's UI is until they try something different. Everyone agrees OSX isn't perfect but compared to the garbage MS is going OSX looks like a saint. Apple couldn't "pay" for better marketing -- all they have to do is let MS suicide itself: Microsoft has never understood good UI. It took them how many years until they had the start of something decent in 95?! LOL

          Win8 is an interesting ball of wax. We already in the progress of migration to it -- mostly new Dell laptops. It is universally hated by everyone I talk to. People hate it for two reasons:

          a) sake of change for the sake of change when there was nothing "wrong" with the old UI
          b) Eveyone agrees Metro makes perfect sense on a tablet but screwing over the desktop users pisses off a lot of people because you are forcing them to waste their time and IT's time to relearn how to do the same thing as before. It is a hindrance from us doing our job and we are already overloaded as it is.

          I know that we're definitely going to be staying on Win 7 as long as possible. Hell, we're already running XP in VMs such as VMWare, Parallels and VirtualBox. A few of the OSX users are using Bootcamp - both Win7 and Win8.

          I haven't heard of one soul asking to use Win 8 (or 8.1) but when you have 100,000 people it probably takes a little but if time for THAT news to travel. :)

  • by JoeyRox (2711699) on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:32PM (#44845233)
    It's a really bad sign when you have to obfuscate product uptake percentages with amorphous terms like "modern desktops" to cover up the fact that your latest flagship software release was an unmitigated disaster. Maybe instead of blaming Microsoft's horrible missteps on Balmer we can blame them on the "Modern Microsoft execute".
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by click2005 (921437) *

      I bet "modern desktops" includes Linux & OSX but MS wont talk about that.

      • Not really. I know this won't go over well here but both Linux and OSX have been failures in the marketplace. Microsoft's biggest OS competition comes from something it release more than a decade ago and desperately wants to kill. I'm sure there are version of Linux and OSX which would be considered "modern" but very few people care. Heck, Win 8 hasn't even been out a year. It's been hated on up and down and it is already ahead of OSX and Linux.

  • by UnknowingFool (672806) on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:33PM (#44845241)

    Reller said the firm has "now seen about three quarters of Windows enterprises moving to modern desktops" from Windows XP, with the last leg of Windows XP migrations being spurred by the imminent availability of Windows 8.1.

    Um, no. Even though firms are buying Win 8, it doesn't mean that they are installing Win 8. Many of them are using a Win 8 license to install Win 7. If MS believes enterprises and consumers want Win 8 by choice, they are deluded.

  • Windows 7... (Score:5, Informative)

    by PhantomHarlock (189617) on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:38PM (#44845275)

    ...is actually nice desktop OS for functional productivity. It's like having XP but upgraded under the hood for modern hardware. Mine is tastefully retrograded to the XP UI theme, plus some deeper settings to get rid of some of the annoying defaults regarding the task bar.

    Had no issues with it for a number of years now and plan to continue using it for the time being.

    • by ColdWetDog (752185) on Friday September 13, 2013 @07:19PM (#44845507) Homepage

      Mine is tastefully retrograded to the XP UI theme,

      "Tasteful" and "XP UI" have, heretofore, never been seen as linked concepts. Typically, the comments are more along the line of 'my eyes bleed' and 'Turn it off!!!".

      I do not want to see what your room looks like.

    • you should try the win7 task bar.. I thought pinning things would be inferior to quick launch, but after upgrading I find I much prefer the pinning option, because they also added hotkeys for the items in the task bar.

      windows + number will switch to the first ten items (or cycle through its group, if several instances are running and grouped), and it will open a new one if there isn't already one running. shift + windows + number will start a new one if there IS one already running.

      I haven't been using 7

    • by MtViewGuy (197597)

      Most corporations have pretty much migrated to Windows 7, not only because of the end of life support issue but also Windows 7 can handle large amounts of RAM, which makes it very useful running multiple corporate custom apps.

      In my opinion, Windows 7 is probably the best version of Windows ever released: stable, fast, and most importantly, the user interface is familiar enough that anyone who's used Windows 95 or later can master Windows 7 fairly quickly.

    • So you disabled instant search, aero snap, and aero peak?

      Then why leave XP? Without these win 7 is XP but with 300% more bloat?!

  • by chuckugly (2030942) on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:41PM (#44845295)
    In fairness, everything Windows PC since XP is NT 6.x, so moving from 5.x to 6.x isn't a completely silly thing to track.
  • Win XP (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:50PM (#44845337)

    Windows XP is a great OS. I'm still using it here and boy, my system is very stable and fast.

  • by QuasiSteve (2042606) on Friday September 13, 2013 @06:52PM (#44845355)

    We're finally getting around to having a bunch of XP boxes replaced with new ones, simply because they're old and a hardware failure in one of them triggered the decision to do pretty much all.

    We looked at getting Win7 machines - or at least getting Win7 installed onto the machines as part of an agreement - but in the end, it just wasn't worth it. More than half our staff already has Win8 at home and are perfectly comfortable with it, and once you get past the start screen, Win8 is, for our purposes, practically the same as Win7.
    I do say 'once you get past the start screen', but we're actually seeing uptake in using it. We tried a few 3rd party start menu offerings (most of them are crap, from not letting you modify it through not even listing all of the installed software that you would see listed if it were a proper start menu), eventually settling on one.. only to realize that most of the staff felt perfectly comfortable with either A. going to the pinned items on the task bar, or B. typing the name of the program from the start screen (we haven't bothered with tiles for most things, and removed almost all of the defaults... if they want to know the weather, they can listen to the forecast every half an hour on the radio, or hunt down the app in 'all apps').

    While the future direction of Win8 may be something to worry about (more and more store-centric, marginalizing the desktop, etc.), the future of Win7 isn't all roses either. Given that Win8 at least will enjoy support far past Win7, well, the choice was a lot easier than we anticipated.

    Our biggest struggle has actually been with outdated software. 16bit software just won't run on Win8 (64bit - can be enabled on 32bit, but that's just another wall waiting to be hit), and while our admin would be comfortable with installing a VM to keep these going, we're just biting the bullet and converting legacy files to formats used by more modern software, finding alternatives for those applications that we do still actively use, and keeping two machines around for everything else; one running with a VNC, and the other in storage 'just in case'.

    • by roc97007 (608802) on Friday September 13, 2013 @07:45PM (#44845649) Journal

      > We looked at getting Win7 machines - or at least getting Win7 installed onto the machines as part of an agreement - but in the end, it just wasn't worth it. More than half our staff already has Win8 at home and are perfectly comfortable with it, and once you get past the start screen, Win8 is, for our purposes, practically the same as Win7.

      Um, no, it really isn't. It must be a relatively small company. We have well over 10,000 users, the great majority of whom are not computer geeks, and there's no way in hell a large company would make a jump like that, unless they were in the business of developing for Windows 8.

      What OS incoming hardware has pre-installed makes absolutely no difference. It is always re-imaged with the company's copy of the OS the company has standardized upon, with the company's blessed settings and applications. No company in their right mind buys PCs and runs whatever is already on them. Among other issues, that's a serious security vector.

      And so, for years we bought PCs loaded with Vista and reimaged them with our copy of XP. Now we're taking PCs and laptops loaded with whatever (Win8, say) and reloading them with our blessed copy of Win7. That's the way any large company does it who doesn't want to experience a widespread IT nightmare.

      So no, unless you're a relatively small company populated with mostly computer geeks, I'm not buying it.

      • by BitZtream (692029)

        ... One of our customers has over 50k desktops, a business in the hospitality industry ... going straight to Windows 8 next year, in both corp offices and individual locations around the globe.

        Contrary to what you think, the world doesn't revolve around you or your narrow view of the world.

        Jumping to 7 rather than 8 just shows you're afraid of change. When 99% of your employees spend all day in a 1 or 2 apps that are full screen, and you treat a machine like a utility rather than your lover, the change do

        • by roc97007 (608802)

          > ... One of our customers has over 50k desktops, a business in the hospitality industry ... going straight to Windows 8 next year, in both corp offices and individual locations around the globe.

          That's corporate suicide, and you know it.

    • big enterprise sites are loaded with in house tools and all kinds of other stuff that makes changing OS hard

    • by Darinbob (1142669)

      How do you manage to install Metro apps? The store requires a Microsoft ID even for free apps. Does the company assign Microsoft IDs to everyone?

    • by willy_me (212994)

      Our biggest struggle has actually been with outdated software. 16bit software just won't run on Win8 (64bit - can be enabled on 32bit, but that's just another wall waiting to be hit), and while our admin would be comfortable with installing a VM to keep these going, we're just biting the bullet and converting legacy files to formats used by more modern software, finding alternatives for those applications that we do still actively use, and keeping two machines around for everything else; one running with a VNC, and the other in storage 'just in case'.

      Run VirtualBox on a machine and setup the appropriate guest OS to run your software. Enable remote display in VirtualBox for your newly created guest OS. Now anyone can connect using RDP or VPN - whichever you decide to host. I recommend RDP because the Windows clients will already have client software installed.

      This is easier than setting up VM software on every computer. It also removes any restrictions governing which computer you can use to host the VM. And finally, it makes creating backups of

  • by roc97007 (608802) on Friday September 13, 2013 @07:37PM (#44845599) Journal

    Yeah. The company I worked for started migrating to Windows 7 earlier this year. We're maybe 30% there. We're going to skip 8.whatever and see what's available when 7 nears end of life.

    Corporations that are not themselves in the computer business tend to be a bit conservative about OS upgrades.

  • by Fantasio (800086) on Friday September 13, 2013 @07:40PM (#44845617)
    I would not be surprised if for Microsoft, "Modern Desktop" means "with NSA compliant backdoors". I have been obliged to switch from XP to 7 and frankly I gained nothing in terms of functionalities or ease of access.
  • by EmagGeek (574360) <gterich@@@aol...com> on Friday September 13, 2013 @08:40PM (#44845925) Journal

    To Linux. We have been 100% Linux since then - not a single Microsoft machine in the entire operation. And yes, we do get threatening letters from the BSA every year...

  • ... it's more to do with the fact that Windows XP extended support (for security updates) ends in April. Which is just over 6 months away.

    Contrary to what some believe, the enterprise is not stupid. If XP performs the functions required (and for many, it does) and is supported for security fixes (it currently is) and there is no compelling financial reason to encourage migration to another platform, guess what? The platform stays.

  • I know of no business-- not even a single one-- hankering & chomping at the bit to move to W8. Indeed, most of them are satisfied with XP and will have to be dragged kicking and screaming away from it come May 2014. The smart ones have already moved to W7, and they're perfectly happy with it. People point to Vista and Millenium Edition as being failures, but I don't think M$ has ever laid such a turd as W8/8.1.
  • is what we're doing, we've jumped to windows 7 on our desks but are still running lagacy items using XP in virtual machines. The hardware is good enough to get decent performance with XP in those VMs.
  • I find it very interesting to read so many people here defending XP in light of its security weaknesses. We're talking about an OS that has a horrible security model out of the box and encourages applications to be designed to run with full admin privileges. If you are a developer stuck on XP and you haven't updated your software to work properly with the newer security model introduced in Vista, well shame on you. You've had way more than enough time... 7 years to be exact.

    XP is the "odd one out" now, with

  • by gestalt_n_pepper (991155) on Saturday September 14, 2013 @08:53AM (#44848323)

    are going to be very disappointed.

  • by gestalt_n_pepper (991155) on Saturday September 14, 2013 @09:01AM (#44848395)

    I've had the distinct lack of pleasure working with the Windows 8.1 RTM for the past two days. Virtually none of our apps installed correctly the first time, including Visual studio 2010. At one point, a large "help" dialog appeared telling me to swipe in from the left hand side. I couldn't get rid of this thing for love or money. Did I mention it covers about 1/4 of the screen and that you basically have to reboot to get rid of it?

    To state the blindingly obvious, interface changes without any significant feature changes are not a value add, they're a value subtract. It doesn't matter if it's the Windows GUI, ASP.net or Powershell.

    Got Microsoft stock? Sell.

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